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Grocery Industry’s Cybersecurity Challenges: Harbinger Of Threats To Corporate America

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Grocery Industry’s Cybersecurity Challenges: Harbinger Of Threats To Corporate America

Button up your overcoat; it’s about to rain cyberthreats   Few businesspeople have as much on the line every moment of every day as grocers. When disquieting events happen at a grocery store, customers can be more than just inconvenienced. In extreme circumstances, grocery products can be the cause of…

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Security Startup Grabs $22M To Safeguard Corporate Email

email_envelopeThe Business Email Compromise is now a top concern for the enterprise and security providers alike, especially since regulators have released warnings against the crime. One startup wants to safeguard corporate email and has just received new venture capital to move forward with its efforts. Agari announced on Tuesday (May 24) that it completed a […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Match Parent Company Announces New Corporate Structure And Ticker

FOREXTV – Jan 21 – IAC will begin trading under: IAC. The five segments will include Match Group Inc., HomeAdvisor, video, publishing, and apps. Read More….

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How Corporate America keeps huge hacks secret

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

How Corporate America keeps huge hacks secret

But the biggest cyberattacks, the ones that can blow up chemical tanks and burst dams, are kept secret by a law that shields U.S. corporations. They’re kept in the dark forever. You could live near — or work at — a major facility that has been hacked repeatedly andINVESTIGATED by the federal government. But you’d never know. What’s more, that secrecy could hurt efforts to defend against future attacks. The murky information that is publicly available confirms that there is plenty to worry about. Unnamed energy utilities and suppliers often make simple mistakes — easily exposing the power grid to terrorist hackers and foreign spies. A CNNMoneyINVESTIGATIONhas reviewed public documents issued by regulators that reveal widespread flaws. There was thePOWER COMPANY that didn’t bother to turn off communication channels on its gear at mini-stations along the electrical grid, leaving access points completely open to hackers. It was fined $425,000 by its regulator in August. Another power company forgot to patch software on 66% of its devices, thus exposing them to known flaws exploited by hackers. It got a $70,000 fine in February. There are plenty of other examples, and all “posed a serious or substantial risk” to portions of the […]

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Who should take the fall after a corporate hack? It may soon be the CEO

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Data breaches can cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars, erode shareholder value, and indelibly tarnish corporate reputations. Yet, chief executives and other top brass at organizations that suffer such incidents have remained largely immune from the fallout. That may be changing. A new survey of 200 directors of public companies conducted by security firm Veracode and the New York Stock Exchange Governance Services shows that corporate boards have become much more serious about data breaches and are willing to hold top executives accountable for them. More than four in 10 of the directors in the survey felt that a company’s chief executive officer should take the rap for a data breach. When asked to prioritize who should be held accountable for such incidents, corporate boards ranked the chief executive officer first, followed by the chief information officer, and then the entire executive team. Chief information security officers, often the fall guys in a data breach situation, ranked fourth in the list – suggesting that directors get it that security executives can do only as well as the support and the resources they get from top management. Security has also become a growing priority for boards. In fact, 81 percent of […]

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New Study Exposes Visual Hacking as Under-Addressed Corporate Risk

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

 Powered by Max Banner Ads ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–While most security professionals focus on thwarting data breaches from high-tech cyber attacks, a new study exposes visual hacking, a low-tech method used to capture sensitive, confidential and private information for unauthorized use, as an under-addressed corporate risk. The 3M Visual Hacking Experiment, conducted by Ponemon Institute on behalf of the Visual Privacy Advisory Council and 3M Company, a leading manufacturer of privacy filters, found that in nearly nine out of ten attempts (88 percent), a white hat hacker was able to visually hack sensitive company information, such as employee access and login credentials, that could potentially put a company at risk for a much larger data breach. “In today’s world of spear phishing, it is important for data security professionals not to ignore low-tech threats, such as visual hacking,” says Larry Ponemon, chairman and founder of Ponemon Institute. “A hacker often only needs one piece of valuable information to unlock a large-scale data breach. This study exposes both how simple it is for a hacker to obtain sensitive data using only visual means, as well as employee carelessness with company information and lack of awareness to data security threats.” During the study, […]

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Dating apps pose US corporate security risk, says IBM

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The millions of people using dating apps on company smartphones could be exposing themselves and their employers to hacking, spying and theft, according to a study by International Business Machines. IBM security researchers said 26 of 41 dating apps they analyzed on Google’s Android mobile platform had medium or high severity vulnerabilities, in a report published on Wednesday.IBM did not name the vulnerable apps but said it had alerted the app publishers to problems. Apps such as Tinder, OkCupid and Match have become hugely popular in the past few years due to their instant messaging, photo and geolocation services. About 31 million Americans have used a dating site or app, according to a 2013 Pew Research Center study. IBM found employees used vulnerable dating apps in nearly 50 percent of the companies sampled for its research. Using the same phone for work and play, a phenomenon known as “bring your own device,” or BYOD, means users and their employers are both open to potential cyberattacks. “The trouble with BYOD is that, if not managed properly, the organizations might be leaking sensitive corporate data via employee-owned devices,” said the IBM report. IBM said the problem is that people on dating apps […]

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Sony Hacked: PS4 Maker Reports Cyber Attack on Corporate Network Systems National Cyber Security

nationalcybersecurity.com – Sony has told employees to avoid connecting to corporate networks or access their email accounts after the media conglomerate said it was hit Monday by a malicious hacker attack, where someone thre…

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Sony Hacked: PS4 Maker Reports Cyber Attack on Corporate Network Systems

Sony Hacked: PS4 Maker Reports Cyber Attack on Corporate Network Systems

Sony has told employees to avoid connecting to corporate networks or access their email accounts after the media conglomerate said it was hit Monday by a malicious hacker attack, where someone threatened to disclose “secrets” about the company. According to […]

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Ex-NSA hackers and their corporate clients are stretching legal boundaries and shaping the future of cyberwar.

Ex-NSA hackers and their corporate clients are stretching legal boundaries and shaping the future of cyberwar.

Bright twenty- and thirtysomethings clad in polo shirts and jeans perch on red Herman Miller chairs in front of silver Apple laptops and sleek, flat-screen monitors. They might be munching on catered lunch—brought in once a week—or scrounging the fully […]

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