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US Formally Blames Russia For Hacking: Why Engaging In A Cyberwar Is Not A Good Idea

ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA - SEPTEMBER 05:  In this handout image provided by Host Photo Agency, Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) greets U.S. President Barack Obama at the G20 summit on September 5, 2013 in St. Petersburg, Russia. The G20 summit is expected to be dominated by the issue of military action in Syria while issues surrounding the global economy, including tax avoidance by multinationals, will also be discussed during the two-day summit.  (Photo by Ramil Sitdikov/Host Photo Agency via Getty Images)

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

US Formally Blames Russia For Hacking: Why Engaging In A Cyberwar Is Not A Good Idea

The United States has formally accused the Russian government of masterminding a slew of cyberattacks on its political organizations and citizens with the objective of interfering with the election process in the United States.
Close on the heels of the

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Cyberwar, De-Extinction, and Precision Agriculture

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I’m wrapping up another book titled The Industries of the Future. Author Alec Ross explains the advances and stumbling blocks that emerge in the next ten years, and describes a way to navigate them. He is one of America’s leading experts on innovation, serving four years as Senior Advisor for Innovation to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Mr. Ross is currently a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. His book identified three future scenarios that I have added to the visual below. These scenarios are Cyberwar, Precision Agriculture, and De-Extinction.
Cyberwar

Cyberwar is defined as actions that penetrate a nation’s computers or networks for the purposes of causing damage or disruption. A cyberwar is just as likely to be fought between a country and a company as it is between two countries. How long before a group of engineers recognizes and prevents a cyber-attack and instead of calling law enforcement, launches a counterattack against the aggressor?

The barriers to entry for cyberwar are much lower than any other domain – just another example of digital collapsing barriers to entry. As Mr. Ross suggests, any country, rogue group, or individual can develop cyber capabilities – as opposed to the years of work, billions of dollars, and scarce scientific talent and materials required to develop nuclear arms. Less than ten countries in the world have nuclear arms – but theoretically, every single country can have cyber arms. This is a 21st-century phenomenon, and the laws, norms and treaties that were developed in prior centuries do not apply – another example of the breadth of structural and institutional change that we face in this emerging future. Mr. Ross terms this “the weaponization of code” and calls it the most significant development in warfare since the development of nuclear weapons. Some nations are assessing the creation of rules for the global community, but vast distances between stakeholders give little hope for agreement.

The cybersecurity market grew from $3.5 billion in 2004, to $64 billion in 2011 and $78 billion in 2015. Mr. Ross expects the total market size to increase to $175 billion by the end of 2017. Finnish cybersecurity expert Mikko Hypponen believes we will see as big a shift in defense industry and military, as the technological shift seen after the Second World War. We will witness the development of cyber-ops over the next fifty to sixty years, consisting completely of virtual arms with nothing to touch.

Precision Agriculture

As the global population grows, hunger grows with it. Some have placed our best hope of feeding the hungry on the combination of big data and agriculture. Precision agriculture promises to gather and evaluate real-time data on weather, water levels, nitrogen levels, air quality, and disease. In this case, precision is not just specific to a farm or an acre, but to each square inch. Sensors from the field feed data to the cloud, where it is combined with data from GPS and weather models. Algorithms then generate a precise set of instructions, guiding farm equipment by remote control based on instructions from software. The equipment is constantly processing information from satellites and soil, evolving towards the capability to sense the needs of each square inch, applying customized fertilizer based on those needs. This ability to customize offers the promise of a major reduction in pollution. Mr. Ross describes how nitrogen from fertilizer creates dead zones in waterways, and produces nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that rivals carbon dioxide and methane in terms of adverse impact on the climate.

Precision agriculture is a future scenario with the potential for great impact. For example, Mr. Ross describes how no other country has suffered more from a lack of farm modernization than India. High costs, scarce water, and other factors make farming very difficult. Twenty-five percent of the world’s hungry, an estimated 190 million people, live in India, and hunger is the country’s number one cause of death. As the population continues to grow rapidly, this future scenario may be the best hope for India, providing a leapfrog opportunity that helps its subsistence-level farmers achieve a high level of performance. Precision agriculture will take farming from the industrial age to a digital age.

De-Extinction

Radical life extension – a scenario on our curve – describes research into prolonging life indefinitely. As grandiose as that seems, Mr. Ross describes a new branch of research that seeks to defy the impossible – not by merely prolonging life but by bringing the extinct back to life. De-Extinction uses genomic technology to take the DNA of dead extinct animals and create embryos that are implanted in the most genetically similar animal. The ethics discussion factors in here, as advances in science and technology put humans in a godlike role. Mr. Ross compares the human behavior that has changed the earth’s climate, with advances in genomics that could alter the world’s ecology. As he describes, species often become extinct for a reason. Reintroducing them potentially changes food chains and introduces viruses and bacteria that nature has not adapted to contain. He states that as our ability to manipulate life grows stronger, it needs to be governed by our human judgment – something that I believe we need to be discussing more.

The most compelling argument supporting the massive change that lies ahead is the sheer number of emerging paradigm shifts. This underscores a key message embedded in the curve visual above: each scenario represents a paradigm shift unto its own, and their intersections amplify the impact. Comments like: we will see as big a shift as – will be said about each of them. This multiplicative affect makes this coming period very different than past eras. So to our future scenarios curve we add three more scenarios. Later this month, I will expand the science and technology curve.
Source:https://frankdiana.net/2016/04/11/cyberwar-de-extinction-and-precision-agriculture/

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Does cyberwar make sense?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Does cyberwar make sense?

Absolutely nothing, said several experts MC polled on the wisdom of hitting back at China over its alleged hacking of U.S. computer networks. Chris Christie and John Kasich became the latest GOP contenders this week to call for the United States to launch its own cyberattacks on countries believed to be targeting American secrets. “It sounds like they don’t know what they’re talking about,” said James Lewis of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “First, China isn’t waging cyberwar on us. They’re engaging in espionage. We’re doing espionage back.” Going on offense against China would probably only make things worse. “A Chinese PLA officer once said to me the problem is, both countries live in glass houses and both have stones.” Still, Chris Christie’s threat to steal and release Chinese information is an option, Lewis said — but one that should be used only if China violates the cyber deal President Xi Jinping struck with President Barack Obama in September. As for John Kasich’s suggestion to attack the hackers themselves, Lewis said most intel people would prefer to be inside an opponent’s networks observing rather than enjoy the short-term benefit of destroying systems that can eventually be replaced. Justin […]

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As Hackers Increasingly Target The Cloud, Rackspace Turns To Military Vet With Cyberwar Experience

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

LONDON — In the dead of night, two Navy SEALs and a former military officer glide toward a U.S. military facility, water lapping quietly against the side of their canoe. Suddenly two navy boats gun their motors as they pass the trio, but they fail to spot the group attempting to break into the secure facility. This is the kind of operation the former officer, Brian Kelly, handled for a few years as a special ops consultant for the U.S. government, to identify gaps in security. (In fact, no one spotted him that night in 2014, and he was able to penetrate the facility, resulting in the firing of a soldier found asleep on the job.) The skill set landed him just a few months later at cloud computing company Rackspace as its chief security officer, using his stealth and smarts to protect the data of the firm’s 300,000 customers. Now he’s facing unprecedented attacks on an entirely new battlefront: the cloud. A recent report says 87 percent of organizations are making use of cloud infrastructure while research firm IDC is predicting cloud infrastructure spending will rise to more than $33 billion in 2015, accounting for a third of all information technology spending. As evidenced by the Dell-EMC megamerger this week, the future of computing is in the cloud, […]

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Ex-NSA hackers and their corporate clients are stretching legal boundaries and shaping the future of cyberwar.

Ex-NSA hackers and their corporate clients are stretching legal boundaries and shaping the future of cyberwar.

Bright twenty- and thirtysomethings clad in polo shirts and jeans perch on red Herman Miller chairs in front of silver Apple laptops and sleek, flat-screen monitors. They might be munching on catered lunch—brought in once a week—or scrounging the fully […]

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Hacker Attacks on American Banks Look More Like Fraud Than Russian Cyberwar – National Cyber Security | National Cyber Security

nationalcybersecurity.com – Only a couple of incidents played into these expectations. The Ukrainian security service claimed in early March that Crimea was being used as a base for cyberattacks on Ukrainian cell-phone networ…

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Hacker Attacks on American Banks Look More Like Fraud Than Russian Cyberwar

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hacker Attacks on American Banks Look More Like Fraud Than Russian Cyberwar

The theft of data from JPMorgan Chase does not fit the established pattern of Russia’s political cyberattacks against rival nations Subtlety has never been the strong suit of Russia’s hacker-patriots. In 2008, during the Russian invasion of Georgia, they managed […]

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CANADIAN GOVERNMENT IN CYBERWAR

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT IN CYBERWAR

After Chinese hackers spent the last month infiltrating Canada’s National Research Council (NRC), an organization presiding over some of the countries most cherished scientific research and development, Canadians have been looking for assurances it won’t happen again.   But in […]

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Anonymous’ Cyberwar Against the Israeli Government

The shadowy hacker collective known as Anonymous has announced it will launch a round of cyber-attacks this Friday against the Israeli government, in retaliation for Israel’s ongoing military intervention in Gaza. This onslaught would add to a wave of cyber assaults […]

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