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Greenville teacher ‘inappropriately touched’ student, warrant says

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ An Upstate middle school teacher is facing a charge of third-degree assault and battery, according to district officials. When the district learned about the charge, Means was placed on administrative leave, …

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Mobile is slow, but cyber-security business will help company grow, says Singtel CEO

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Mobile is slow, but cyber-security business will help company grow, says Singtel CEO

Cyber security is a key growth segment for Southeast Asia’s largest telco Singtel, as price competition in data and voice intensifies globally, its chief executive told CNBC. “Our core carriage business that is your traditional voice, data businesses, those face significant price competition … The growth that we have seen in our ICT (information and communication technology) businesses has certainly …

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DocuSign says hackers accessed customer email database

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

DocuSign says hackers accessed customer email database

Electronic signature service DocuSign said on Tuesday hackers had temporarily gained access to a database containing customer emails following a surge in phishing emails sent to its users. The company, which has about 200 million users, said the emails imitated the DocuSign brand to trick recipients into opening a Microsoft Word document containing malicious software. The breach comes amid heightened …

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Microsoft says ransomware hack a ‘wake-up call’ for world governments

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Microsoft says ransomware hack a ‘wake-up call’ for world governments

Global governments should treat a massive international cyber attack that struck last week as a wake-up call and should feel a “renewed determination for more urgent collective action,” the chief legal officer of Microsoft has said. Writing in a blog post, Brad Smith said that the multinational technology company had been working around the clock since Friday to help customers …

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Russian charged with breaching U.S. firms says FBI attempted to coerce confession over Clinton hack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Russian charged with breaching U.S. firms says FBI attempted to coerce confession over Clinton hack

A Russian man wanted by the Justice Department on charges connected to hacking U.S. companies now claims the FBI offered him immunity in exchange for accepting responsibility for cyberattacks targeting former Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Yevgeny Nikulin, the alleged hacker, laid the claim to Russian media Thursday in a letter sent from a Czech Republic prison cell amid an international …

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When the Govt Says Cybersecurity, Get Your Head Down, Cos the Koreans Are Coming

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

When the Govt Says Cybersecurity, Get Your Head Down, Cos the Koreans Are Coming

Hey folks. Just spent the past week investigating potential sites for my post-nuclear apocalypse survival camp and, uh, “recruiting” nubile young cult… I mean commune members. East Africa is a touch too close to the Korean Peninsula for my liking, in light of the little palaver that’s going on between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un. I hope that you …

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Severe cybersecurity incidents cost shareholders billions, says CGI

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Severe cybersecurity incidents cost shareholders billions, says CGI

Digitalisation comes with benefits, and pitfalls, for businesses. A new report highlights the cost of severe cybersecurity breaches on the share price of companies in the long-term, which average a reduction of 1.8%. The research too finds that the long-term negative effect on share price is increasing, creating additional incentives for business owners and the executive to act to prevent breaches where possible.

The digitalisation of business process creates a number of benefits to business operations, from lower costs to additional revenue streams. Digitalisation is not without issue however, as cybersecurity costs mount, transformation programmes fail and regulatory frameworks are imposed to haul in and forestall potentially abusive practices.

One area that is increasingly on the agenda at the boardroom level is cybersecurity. Businesses are increasingly finding themselves open to security incidents, with costs for business as a whole running in the order of $280 billion according to a recent report from Grant Thornton.

In a new report from CGI, titled ‘The Cyber-Value Connection’, the consulting firm explores the effect of cybersecurity breaches on the share price of companies affected. The research involved independent economic modelling from Oxford Economics, whose analytical methodology examines share price movements in companies that had experienced cyber breaches.

The research shows that there is a link between the share price of a company and cybersecurity breaches. Across the 65 companies in the sample, affected by a severe cybersecurity incident, the average long-term effect on share price was found to be 1.8%.

The performance of companies prior to the breach was found to have a correlation with the effect of the breach on share price. Poorly performing companies were found to be harder hit, their share price falling by an average of 2.3%, while companies outperforming their peers were found to average 1.1% reductions in share price in the long-term. The low sample size, the research notes, prohibits predictions in terms of the usual statistical levels of significance.

When averaging over the value of the average FTSE 100 company, a 1.8% average reduction in share price would see a £120 million loss of market capitalisation. Multiplying the average across the 65 companies whose severe breaches were considered as part of the research, the total costs hit £42 billion for the respective shareholders.

The research in addition to identifying the average cost to companies affected from a severe breach, also found that catastrophic breaches resulted in significant depreciations in the long-term value of companies. One UK media and communications company, that had a catastrophic breach in 2015, has seen its share price fall by 15% in the long-term, while a retail company, also in the UK, has suffered a loss of 12.9% of its share price value from a breach in 2014.

Company share prices across a range of sectors have been negatively affected by catastrophic breaches, with the top 10 largest breaches covered by the research ranging between a fall of 15% and 4.8%.

The value of a major UK supermarket, following a cyber security breach, saw almost immediate reprisal from investors, as the share price fell by more than 7 percentage points during the week following the incident. The fallout from the event saw a further 1 percentage point drop as the full consequences of the event became clear to an irate public.

The research also found that the effects of cyber security incidents, measure on the Friday following the event, are becoming more severe with time. The average percentage point decrease to a firm’s share price stood at 0.2% in 2013, by 2014 this stood at a decrease of 1.5% of their share price, while for the period 2015/16 the effect of share price almost doubled to a decrease of 2.7%.

The research also found that different sectors are affected differently in terms of loss to their respective share prices. The retail, hospitality and travel industry, for instance, saw a negative impact of 0.4% on their share price measured on the Friday following the incident, heathcare saw a drop of 0.7%, while technology saw a decrease of 2.1%. Communications and financial firms were the hardest hit however, with decreases of 2.6% and 2.7% respectively.

Remarking on the research, a spokesperson from CGI states, “Clearly, the CEO has responsibility for increasing company value. With the link between cyber breach and company value established in this report, it is clear the CEO’s responsibility must also include direction and governance of cybersecurity.”

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Iran-linked hackers used Microsoft Word flaw against Israeli targets, security firm says

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Iran-linked hackers used Microsoft Word flaw against Israeli targets, security firm says

Hackers allegedly linked to the Iranian government launched a digital espionage operation this month against more than 250 different Israel-based targets by using a recently disclosed and widely exploited Microsoft Word vulnerability, cybersecurity experts tell CyberScoop.

The hacking group, dubbed OilRig by security researchers and believed to be tied to Iranian intelligence services, utilized a software flaw in Word officially known as CVE-2017-0199 that allows attackers to execute a remote computer intrusion to take full control of a target device while leaving little or no trace, said Michael Gorelik, vice president of Israeli security firm Morphisec.

Over the last month, Morphisec has investigated the incident on behalf of multiple victims. Clients showed forensic evidence on their respective networks that could be linked back to OilRig. After its disclosure in March, CVE-2017-0199 was quickly exploited by nation-states and cybercriminals alike.

John Hultquist, ‎Director of Cyber Espionage Analysis at iSIGHT Partners, confirmed Morphisec’s findings.

“We have recently seen these actors and [other] cyber espionage actors targeting Asia adopt CVE-2017-0199. The vulnerability was a proliferation issue before it was patched, and remains one now,” said Hultquist.

OilRig has been around since at least 2015, according to numerous security industry experts who have watched the group target Israeli networks repeatedly and with varying tactics.

To exploit the Microsoft Word vulnerability, a target must open or preview an infected Microsoft Office or WordPad file, which OilRig sent out in large numbers to hundreds of Israeli-based targets, including government agencies and officials. When opened, the attachment designed by OilRig would download the Hanictor trojan, a variant of fileless malware capable of bypassing most security and anti-virus protections.

CVE-2017-0199 was patched earlier this month by Microsoft after an extraordinary nine-month delay from when it was initially communicated to the company privately. Getting the vast ecosystem of Microsoft users to patch machines is a slow and unreliable process, however, so many often remain vulnerable after a patch is published.

Point of initial contact

“The OilRig campaign is a multi-stage kill chain meant to burrow into Israeli critical defense infrastructure,” said Tom Kellermann, CEO of D.C.-based venture capital firm Strategic Cyber Ventures. Kellerman is a major investor in TrapX, another cybersecurity firm that also detected and helped clients defend against the Iranian cyberattack.

The beginnings of the Iranian operation are believed to have started with a series of phishing emails sent to Ben Gurion University employees although it quickly expanded to include various Israeli technology and medical companies. Ben Gurion University is home to Israel’s Cyber Security Research Center, a scientific institute that develops sophisticated cyber capabilities.

Gorelik said an investigation is ongoing to better understand the full scope of damage caused by the hackers. His firm, Morphisec, posted technical analysis of the attack on Thursday morning.

Investigators were able to identify a series of command and control servers activated by the hackers on April 16, which were subsequently used to launch the offensive cyber operation, according to a notification published Wednesday by Israel’s Computer Emergency Response Team. The first round of phishing emails were sent on April 19 and the last came on April 24. The malware-laden emails carried subject lines relating to nonexistent “resumes, exams and holiday plans,” said Gorelik.

Exploiting CVE-2017-0199 enables an attacker to download and execute a Visual Basic script containing PowerShell commands whenever a vulnerable user opens a document containing an embedded exploit, according to American cybersecurity firm FireEye. Malware payloads executed after the exploit can come from all manner of malware families.

FireEye previously found that various hackers — including both governments and cybercriminals — were using the same CVE-2017-0199 vulnerability to breach a wide array of different victims.

On April 11, researchers at FireEye described an attack exploiting CVE-2017-0199 this way:

A threat actor emails a Microsoft Word document to a targeted user with an embedded OLE2 embedded link object
When the user opens the document, winword.exe issues a HTTP request to a remote server to retrieve a malicious HTA file
The file returned by the server is a fake RTF file with an embedded malicious script
Winword.exe looks up the file handler for application/hta through a COM object, which causes the Microsoft HTA application (mshta.exe) to load and execute the malicious script
“This kind of vulnerability is very rare,” Gorelik said. “There has been progress from this group. This is one of the more advanced fileless campaigns I’ve seen. It was a targeted, large campaign using quite a big infrastructure. It’s fileless, so it’s very hard to detect. They regenerated signatures on the endpoint each and every time for the trojan so it’s very hard to remediate, identify or remove it.

He added, “this Iranian group is quite advanced I would say.”

The Iran-backed espionage campaign was first revealed in broad terms Wednesday through a vague press announcement issued by the Prime Minister’s Office, claiming that Israel’s newly formed Cyber Defense Authority helped to thwart the attack.

The attacks were “relatively well planned and took considerable resources. It is obvious that there was intelligence gathering prior to the attack and a careful selection of targets — in this case Israeli computing companies,” said Boaz Dolev, CEO of the Israeli security firm ClearSky in an interview with the Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

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Cybersecurity firm Trustlook says 38% of ransomware victims pay up

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cybersecurity firm Trustlook says 38% of ransomware victims pay up

Cybersecurity firm Trustlook has conducted some new research that shows it’s not only businesses that are threatened by ransomware. There is an increase in regular users being targeted by ransomware …

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Abuse victim forced to give her baby up for adoption was let down by police, says watchdog

A domestic abuse victim whose baby was subsequently put up for adoption was failed by South Wales Police, the police watchdog has concluded.

The teenage mum was initially not treated as a victim of abuse despite eyewitness evidence of an assault, of which he has now been convicted, and evidence of abusive messages.

Her local authority, the Vale of Glamorgan, is also now being investigated over its handling of her case, which saw it enrol her on joint counselling sessions with her abusive partner.

The father of the 18-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, believes the public bodies’ handling of the allegations led to her child, now two, being taken away from her against her will.

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