The growth of cyber crime and why it may take a Manhattan Project-scale response to stop

cyber-crime-1

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Examples are easy. In December, malicious software allowed bank robbers to take as much as $1 billion from institutions in 30 countries. In November, Sony had that little problem with North Korea. In October, hackers snagged 40 million credit and debit card numbers from Target. A few months before that, computer systems at Canada’s National Research Council suffered a massive hit by a cyberattacker. The question is what we can do to stop the spies and cyber criminals? Marc Goodman, a former beat cop who specializes in technology and law enforcement, attempts an answer in his new book Future Crimes: Everyone is Connected, Everyone is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It. He spoke to National Post‘s Rachel Greenspan from his home in Southern California. How do you begin to attribute attacks like the recent hack on more than 100 banks around the world to specific groups of people? It’s a problem, both at the criminal level and at the nation-state level. Any decent bad guy will obfuscate their online traffic. So if I’m China and I want to hack the U.S., I’m not going to launch a bunch of bits towards Washington from People’s Liberation Army headquarters in Beijing. […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post The growth of cyber crime and why it may take a Manhattan Project-scale response to stop appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Print Friendly

Comments are Closed