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#onlinedating | Politics have become a deal-breaker in many relationships | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

<p>The fallout from COVID-19 confronts graduating college seniors with a stark economic reality which, sadly, no amount of inspirational commencement speeches can undo. Across-the-board hiring freezes are common, and many summer internships, which serve the critical role of integrating young professionals into the workplace, are postponed or cancelled. Similar to the financial crash of 2008, students’ professional mettle will be tested.</p><p>Yet I am hopeful that the seeds of opportunity were planted years ago, and that we are seeing some green shoots. What specifically do I mean? In 2016, long before COVID-19 disrupted the economy, I founded the company <a href=”https://www.parkerdewey.com/” target=”_blank”>Parker Dewey</a>—named after Francis Parker and John Dewey, the “founding fathers” of experiential learning—to help fix the broken entry-level hiring system. The traditional ways to identify, assess, and hire college students and recent graduates for full-time roles is ineffective, resulting in approximately 45% of recent college graduates being <a href=”https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/college-labor-market/college-labor-market_underemployment_rates.html” target=”_blank”>under</a> or <a href=”https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/college-labor-market/college-labor-market_unemployment.html” target=”_blank”>unemployed</a>. Employers, who spend enormous time and effort hiring new college graduates, <a href=”https://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsyth.t03.htm” target=”_blank”>see most leave before the one-year mark</a>. </p><p>Typically, it goes like this: a job opening is posted online, hundreds of people apply instantly, narrowing the applicant field becomes a near-impossible task, and an interviewer eventually glances at a resume before asking questions that won’t substitute for seeing a job candidate in action.</p>

<p>We designed Parker Dewey to fix that by connecting college students and recent graduates—we call them Career Launchers—with specific projects from some of the nation’s most sought-after employers, and those that may be “under the radar.” Since launching, we’ve partnered with firms ranging from start-ups to those in the Fortune 100, which use our proprietary platform to provide these “micro-internship” opportunities. These mutually beneficial experiences allow both the Career Launcher and the company to test-drive each other before a full-time role is offered or filled.</p><p>In addition, micro-internships allow college students to better hone and demonstrate those “core skills” most valued by employers such as communication, adaptability, problem solving, and grit. While these skills are a key component of a post-secondary curriculum, rarely do students (or employers) appreciate the crosswalks from classroom to career, especially in classes that don’t sound like a job title.</p>

<blockquote>Right now, 55% of college graduates leave a full-time roll before completing a full year.</blockquote>

<p>Micro-internships provide professional opportunities that many Career Launchers would lack in a world of typical internships alone, which require a 10- or 12-week commitment, cannot be completed remotely, and are often unpaid. Traditional summer internships are inaccessible to students who work while earning their degree, who need flexible scheduling, and even student-athletes who compete and train while their peers explore careers. As a direct result of the uncertainty brought on by COVID-19, more employers are recognizing the need for more flexible opportunities to attract, assess, and hire Career Launchers.</p><p>Some of the <a href=”https://www.parkerdewey.com/example-projects” target=”_blank”>typical projects available</a> on <a href=”https://app.parkerdewey.com/auth/talent/sign-up” target=”_blank”>Parker Dewey’s platform</a> include creating a social media editorial calendar, drafting a press release form, wireframing a fitness app, editing an independent film, and creating digital “vaults” for financial investors—plus many more.</p><p>Each project has a thorough description, start date, end date, estimated number of hours to completion, and the amount the Career Launcher will be paid. We are fully integrated with LinkedIn, so creating a professional profile on the Parker Dewey platform is easy, and we eliminate the problem of applicant deluge by matching individuals with companies when each side shows a mutual interest in each other.</p>

<p>Beyond providing all types of students with access to employment, micro-internships have been described as “job dating,” and while we didn’t model the platform on dating apps, I can definitely see the parallel. I think companies and potential employees should “date” each other before making the engagement-like commitment of an internship, or the marriage of a full-time role. Right now, 55% of college graduates leave a full-time roll before completing a full year.</p><p>When I was fresh out of undergrad as an accounting major, I was hired by a big accounting firm for what was supposed to be my dream job. But I knew after one week it wasn’t what I wanted. Without a platform to showcase my skills to companies in other industries, or explore other pathways, I was a fresh-water fish in the salty accounting seas. In this time of economic uncertainty, Parker Dewey connects Career Launchers with paying projects from top employers, while giving each side time to learn more about each other. That’s a win-win we could all use right now. <a href=”https://app.parkerdewey.com/auth/talent/sign-up” target=”_blank”>You can create your profile now</a> to get instant access to industry-leading micro-internships.</p>

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The post #onlinedating | Politics have become a deal-breaker in many relationships | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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DOJ Emphasizes Adequate Funding in Updated Compliance Guidance | Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) | #employeefraud | #recruitment | #corporatesecurity | #businesssecurity | #

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Report on Medicare Compliance 29, no. 21 (June 8, 2020)

Whether an organization shows its commitment to compliance with dollars is a new focus of the second update to guidance on evaluating compliance programs from the Department of Justice (DOJ). In its updated Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs,[1] released June 1, DOJ indicates that adequate funding of the program and its people helps distinguish between a paper and an active program.

The guidance is used by white-collar prosecutors who evaluate compliance programs when deciding whether to file fraud charges and what the charges should be. Compliance officers also use the guidance to benchmark their organization’s compliance program. DOJ published the first version in 2017 and revised it in April 2019. The Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs modifies the Principles of Federal Prosecution of Business Organizations in the Justice Manual.[2]

There are detailed questions about compliance programs in the guidance, which is organized around three “fundamental questions” that prosecutors try to answer when evaluating effectiveness. The 2020 version modified the second question to refocus on resources:

  1. “Is the corporation’s compliance program well designed?“

  2. “Is the program being applied earnestly and in good faith?” In other words, is the program adequately resourced and empowered to function effectively?

  3. “Does the corporation’s compliance program work” in practice?

In elaborating on resources, DOJ explained that “prosecutors are instructed to probe specifically whether a compliance program is a ‘paper program’ or one ‘implemented, reviewed, and revised, as appropriate, in an effective manner.’ [Justice Manual § 9-28.800]. In addition, prosecutors should determine ‘whether the corporation has provided for a staff sufficient to audit, document, analyze, and utilize the results of the corporation’s compliance efforts.’ [Justice Manual § 9-28.800].”

The emphasis on funding doesn’t come as a shock. “You would have to have adequate resources before you get to adequate or better effectiveness,” said attorney Gabriel Imperato, with Nelson Mullins Broad and Cassel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Prosecutors have always factored in the funding of compliance programs, although it’s significant to see this in writing, said Kirk Ogrosky, former deputy chief of DOJ’s fraud section. “You can have compliance officers who are making a fraction of what other senior executives are making,” he said.

The guidance also encourages organizations to advance compliance at all times, even during an investigation, said former federal prosecutor Robert Trusiak, an attorney in Buffalo, New York. As DOJ states, “In answering each of these three ‘fundamental questions,’ prosecutors may evaluate the company’s performance on various topics that the Criminal Division has frequently found relevant in evaluating a corporate compliance program both at the time of the offense and at the time of the charging decision and resolution.” DOJ reinforces this point when it talks about the risk assessment. “Prosecutors should endeavor to understand why the company has chosen to set up the compliance program the way that it has, and why and how the company’s compliance program has evolved over time.”

In other words, Trusiak said, “effective compliance is not set it and forget it. Compliance is an iterative process.”

DOJ Revises Other Questions

DOJ’s revisions ripple through the rest of the document, which is loaded with specific questions about commitment by senior and middle management, risk assessments, due diligence, communication with employees, oversight of third parties and other hot topics.

For example, the 2019 guidance asked whether the organization’s risk assessment was “current and subject to periodic review? Have there been any updates to policies and procedures in light of lessons learned? Do these updates account for risks discovered through misconduct or other problems with the compliance program?”

The 2020 guidance drills down. “Is the periodic review limited to a ‘snapshot’ in time or based upon continuous access to operational data and information across functions? Has the periodic review led to updates in policies, procedures, and controls?”

There are also more questions about how organizations ensure that policies get in the hands of employees and vendors. For example, “have the policies and procedures been published in a searchable format for easy reference? Does the company track access to various policies and procedures to understand what policies are attracting more attention from relevant employees?” The stakes also are raised on employee awareness of the hotline. “Does the company take measures to test whether employees are aware of the hotline and feel comfortable using it?”

Imperato noted that DOJ “dwells a fair amount on third-party due diligence” and whether it continues after the deal is done. For example, DOJ asks, “What has been the company’s process for tracking and remediating misconduct or misconduct risks identified during the due diligence process? What has been the company’s process for implementing compliance policies and procedures, and conducting post acquisition audits, at newly acquired entities?”

Questions on learning from mistakes were also tweaked. “Does the company review and adapt its compliance program based upon lessons learned from its own misconduct and/or that of other companies facing similar risks?” There are other changes to questions, including, for example, about training and “monitoring investigations and resulting discipline.”

Imperato said he will attach the updated guidance to his board training, along with other documents. “This automatically becomes the benchmark…for setting up a compliance program and determining its effectiveness.”

Ogrosky noted, however, that even well-funded, effective compliance programs may fail to detect bad actors. “Fraud is a non-self-revealing offense,” he said. “The people who commit fraud at large corporations are doing it to avoid the compliance folks.” He’s referring to flat-out fraud, not a debate about whether an arrangement fits within a safe harbor, for example.

Whether fraudsters inside corporations are unmasked depends more on whether executives ask the right questions vs. looking the other way, Ogrosky said. For example, if a salesperson outperforms his or her peers 50 times over, managers should dig into it. “If a contractor is able to do what no one has been able to do, ask why, because the fraud is not self-revealing.” DOJ will expect the corporation to accept some responsibility for bad actors, even when they have good compliance programs, he said.

1 U.S. Dep’t of Justice, Criminal Div., Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs (Updated June 2020), http://bit.ly/2Z2Dp8R.
2 U.S. Dep’t of Justice, Justice Manual, Principles of Federal Prosecution of Business Organizations, § 9-28.000 (2020), http://bit.ly/2GtxXFt.

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The post DOJ Emphasizes Adequate Funding in Updated Compliance Guidance | Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) | #employeefraud | #recruitment | #corporatesecurity | #businesssecurity | # appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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A New Viewer’s Guide to Netflix’s ‘Dating Around’ Ahead of Season 2 – TV Insider | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Are you a a reality TV junkie looking for your next fix? It’s harder and harder to come by with staples like The Bachelorette and Bachelor in Paradise on hiatus with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, but fear not because Netflix has you covered.

Season 2 of their addictive romantic reality title Dating Around arrives June 12 on the streaming platform. Below, we’re breaking down all the details newcomers need to know before diving into this bingeable fare.

The Premise

Each episode of this series follows one single person looking for love as they go on five different blind dates. Exploring the awkward, sweet and flirty banter common in a first date setting, Dating Around asks the question, who will get a second date? In Season 2 of the program, singles based out of New Orleans will be followed.

Inclusive

Dating Around Season 2

(Credit: Netflix)

Stepping up its game from network dating shows, this series examines all kinds of relationships and orientations ranging from heterosexual and bisexual to same-sex couples. Dating Around is a more diverse alternative in comparison to shows like The Bachelorette or Bachelor which have recently come under fire for its lack of inclusion.

Teaser

Netflix is offering a glimpse at what’s to come in a newly released trailer which hints at some interesting situations including an awkward reunion between former Tinder matches.

Extra Viewing

If you didn’t tune in for Season 1, there are six episodes currently available for streaming on Netflix. Each installment is roughly a half-hour in length and follows six singles on their quest to find the one for them. Season 1 includes Luke, Gurki, Lex, Leonard, Sarah and Mila, but don’t expect anything beyond their blind dates as Season 1 didn’t include a reunion special like the platform’s other buzzy shows Too Hot to Handle and Love Is Blind.

Dating Around, Season 2 Premiere, Friday, June 12, Netflix

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The post A New Viewer’s Guide to Netflix’s ‘Dating Around’ Ahead of Season 2 – TV Insider | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#sextrafficking | Covid-19 has increased children’s exposure to traffickers | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Crime & Justice, Health, Human Rights

Families, communities and policymakers must now work in tandem to eliminate this life-scarring menace

Jun 11 2020 – With Covid-19 bringing economic activities across nations to a halt, more and more people are being pushed into poverty. Job losses, business losses and farming losses, leading to economic stress, are pushing many to the fringes of poverty. And as families are being rendered helpless, the worst sufferers are invariably the children.

“46 percent children suffer from multidimensional poverty,” suggests a report shared recently by Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha (BSS). And in the face of the growing economic hardships of the people, triggered by Covid-19, the number is likely to shoot up in the coming months.

From increased threats of modern slavery—domestic servitude, sex trafficking, and forced labour, such as begging—and reduced access to nutrition, basic healthcare facilities and education, to increased risk of emotional abuse and mental trauma, children today, especially the ones born into poverty, are at greater risk of exploitation.

According to Unicef, “The economic fallout of the Covid-19 pandemic could push up to 86 million more children into household poverty by the end of 2020.”

Save the Children and Unicef suggest that, “Immediate loss of income means families are less able to afford the basics, including food and water, less likely to access health care or education, and more at risk of child marriage, violence, exploitation and abuse. When fiscal contraction occurs, the reach and quality of the services families depend on can also be diminished.”

And with more and more people becoming jobless, chances of families abandoning their children, or using them to earn money is increasing by the day. According to a United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report, “due to the pandemic, more children are being forced onto the streets to search for food and money, thus increasing their risk of exploitation.”

And more concerning are the lurking threats of the different ways in which children, in the wake of Covid-19 are being forced into sexual exploitation. For one, families in this part of the world, unable to feed “extra mouths”, often marry off their girls at an early age. Sometimes even in exchange for money. These little girls are subjected to marital rape by their husbands, and more often than not, suffer severe reproductive health damages due to the burden of early motherhood.

And if the girls are not so lucky, they are sold to traffickers by their husbands for money. Sometimes, in fact, predators marry young girls to be able to sell them for good money into sex slavery. While writing a detailed piece on this issue last year, I found that at times of desperation, the families themselves sell girls into prostitution. There have been cases where young sex workers had claimed that they had been sold to dalals by their own mothers.

Young boys face a different kind of fate. They are sent away to work in the informal sector to earn money for their families. And some of these young boys are preyed upon by predators for trafficking as slaves and sometimes into male prostitution.

According to a 2014 report by The Scelles Foundation, 42 million worldwide were involved in sex slavery. Of them, about eight million were men—it is not just women who are at the risk of being trafficked into sexual slavery. Male prostitution remains a less discussed issue, which is why when referring to sex slavery, the dialogues mostly centre around girls. But young boys do get raped and the possibility of them being forced into prostitution cannot be ignored.

And the children who have been sent out of the house to earn their living as beggars live with the constant threat of being exploited by their ring leaders. These girls and boys are not only taken advantage of by their employers but are also at times abused by the people giving them alms. I was once horrified when I saw a driver holding on to a semi-clothed girl’s hand while giving her alms. The girl—not knowing that it is not right for someone to touch her without her permission—was just happy that she got a note! Next time on the road, take a careful look, and the abuse of these children will become apparent.

But with Covid-19, you would think the demand for prostitution would have taken a hit, but you’d be wrong. The risk remains: according to Mama Fatima Singhateh, Special Rapporteur on the sale and sexual exploitation of children, appointed by the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, the Covid-19 lockdown has resulted in people finding newer ways of availing prostitution services—through “delivery” or “drive-through”. According to Singhateh, people’s tendency to access illegal websites featuring child pornography has also increased— “Producing and accessing child sexual abuse material and live-stream child sexual abuse online has now become an easy alternative to groom and lure children into sexual activities and to trade images in online communities.”

A report published by the Council on Foreign Relations echoes the same fear— “While the current drop in global demand might temporarily disrupt exploitative circumstances, this effect is likely short-lived and eclipsed by increased vulnerability. Within sex trafficking, for example, the demand for commercial sex has dropped due to social distancing regulations. However, there is evidence that online sexual exploitation of children is on the rise, indicating that perpetrators are adapting in response to the environment.”

And this brings into the picture a new set of prey: children from middle-income to higher-income families who have access to the internet. These children, for whom the internet is the only means of staying connected with their friends and teachers, are at risk of being preyed upon by malicious traffickers.

And stuck at home, detached from the life they used to live, these children—according to Kazi Amdadul Hoque, Director-Strategic Planning and Head of Climate Action, Friendship, an international NGO—face a different kind of trauma. The fear of uncertainty, the fear of contagion and the depression from the lack of access to friends and outdoor activities make these children especially vulnerable to predators.

Child psychologist Tarana Anis suggests that now more than ever, parents and families have to be vigilant about the kind of online content their children are being exposed to, who their children are interacting with online, and which website they are accessing frequently. She suggests that families should engage in more shared activities and open discussions about current issues with their children.

This is certainly one way of tackling this problem. But we must keep in mind that the threat of physically trafficking children and selling them into prostitution or forced labour remains. Maybe there has been a decline in demand now, but it is only temporary. With the state’s resources already stretched fighting Covid-19, the government will find it difficult to fight off these other diseases, but this one definitely needs attention.

The government, along with bringing the poor under social safety schemes, must also mobilise the law enforcement agencies to strictly monitor the trafficking situation in the country. And families should spend more time with children and educate them about the risks that they might face online. The communities must look out for each, support each other and report suspicious activities. It is time we start looking out for ourselves, our loved ones and our communities, and report the wrongs to the concerned authorities, for the greater good of our children.

Tasneem Tayeb is a columnist for The Daily Star.
Her Twitter handle is: @TayebTasneem

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

 

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#sextrafficking | Advocates say youth shelter in Truro would protect teens from human trafficking | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The recent case of a man who was unlawfully at large in the Truro, N.S., area and allegedly committed dozens of sex and drug trafficking crimes against children shows the need for a local youth shelter is dire, says a youth advocate.

Michelle Rafuse, a volunteer who supports First Nations youth in court, said a shelter for young people would help prevent at-risk youth from becoming victims of violence and sexual exploitation.

“There’s no place for kids to go in Truro if they need a place to stay,” said Rafuse, who often allows homeless kids to stay at her own home.

“If they have no place to go, they end up in circumstances where they could get led down a path they don’t want to be on.”

Truro and the surrounding Colchester County do not have a youth shelter. The counties of Digby, Yarmouth, Shelburne, Pictou and Halifax all have youth shelters serving their areas.

Youth shelters are usually run by not-for-profit groups and are aimed at ending homelessness for people aged 16 to 24. The youth stay for several months and receive connections and support to help them get their lives on track.

Morgan MacDonald, 31, was living in Truro and unlawfully at large during the time he is alleged to have committed dozens of sex and drug trafficking crimes against children. He communicated over Facebook using the name Kaycee MacDonald, victims say. (CBC)

CBC News spoke to a 22-year-old Indigenous man who said he spent the last several years homeless in Truro. He said he used to walk around the town at night messaging friends and asking for a place to stay, often crashing at the homes of friends on their laundry room floors. If he couldn’t find a place to stay, he kept walking.

“It was weird sleeping outside, so I just stayed awake,” said the young man, who recently found housing because a member of the community offered up her home. “There’s a lot of people in the same boat. There’s a pretty big need for it.”

CBC News is not identifying the man because he has been a participant in the youth criminal justice system, involved in break and enters, which he said he did to get money to support himself. He said he wouldn’t have committed those crimes had he not been so desperate and had a safe home.

He said his troubles started in his teens when his relationship with his father turned volatile. Upset about the fighting, he failed to turn up at his job baking cookies and bread at a local bakery. After losing the job, he said he was kicked out of the house because he could no longer pay the rent.

Truro has emergency shelter, but it’s not just for youth

Truro has a youth centre, which has been closed due to COVID-19, but it’s only open during the day. There is also an overnight emergency shelter open to youth over the age of 16.

Truro, with its population of 12,500 is a hub town, a crossroads where the Trans-Canada Highway joins from three different directions. The town is next door to the Millbrook First Nation, a Mi’kmaw community with many members living off-reserve. 

A 2018 Statistics Canada study found Nova Scotia had the highest rate of human trafficking in the country in 2016.

Joe Pinto, a local developer and businessman, said he’s noticed the growing issue of youth homelessness in Truro.

“There seems to be a lot of kids that the parents are not available to look after them or they’re just on the street, couch-surfing, going from place to place. I feel that there’s a need to house them and give them a bit of guidance,” he said. 

Pinto said he has space available in downtown Truro for a youth shelter if a community group is interested.

Social services and housing are provincial responsibilities. In a joint statement, the Department of Community Services and the Department of Municipal Affairs and Housing described having a place to live as an important piece of the complex problem of human trafficking.

To propose a youth shelter for the town, a community group would first have to submit a proposal, which could include a request for funding, to Nova Scotia’s Department of Municipal Affairs and Housing. So far, no such proposal has come forward.

What the province says it’s doing

The Nova Scotia government earmarked $1.4 million in new funding to combat human trafficking, some of which is trickling down to Truro. In the town, there is one housing support worker and a trustee who can help at-risk youth find secure, stable housing. The province said rent subsidies are available and the Truro Homeless Outreach Society can also connect people to safe and affordable housing.

Truro Mayor Bill Mills said he’s open to the idea of a youth shelter, but it’s going to be a tough sell right now to get funding from the municipality because everyone is being stretched.

“On the surface, if we could pull this off and have a youth shelter and the right people in place… sure, why not,” he said, adding that a letter to council would be the first step.

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#mobilesecurity | #android | #iphone | Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Market Growth Insight Analysis 2020-2026 – Cole Reports | #cybersecurity | #informationsecurity

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The “Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Market” research report enhanced worldwide Coronavirus COVID19 impact analysis on the market size (Value, Production and Consumption), splits the breakdown (Data Status 2014-2020 and 6 Year Forecast From 2020 to 2026), by region, manufacturers, type and End User/application. This Trusted Platform Module (TPM) market report…

The post #mobilesecurity | #android | #iphone | Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Market Growth Insight Analysis 2020-2026 – Cole Reports appeared first on .

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#onlinedating | Love Island’s Curtis Pritchard admits he cannot face dating again following split from Maura Higgins | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Curtis Pritchard admits that he cannot face dating again following his messy split from Maura Higgins.

The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows.  

Speaking to The Sun about the split, Curtis said: ‘It hurt. I wasn’t ready for everyone to know we had split up — I wanted some time.

Candid: Curtis Pritchard admits that he cannot face dating again following his messy split from Maura Higgins

‘It was a shock to see that she had announced it on social media hours later.’ 

He insists that he is now content to remain single and will not be signing up to online dating platforms anytime soon.

The TV personality added: ‘I’m very old-fashioned. I don’t actually like talking to people over a mobile phone or laptop. I’m a very sociable person. I like to be with somebody and talk to them.’ 

Heartache: The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows

Heartache: The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows

But it comes after Maura herself said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she ‘needs a man’.

The 29-year-old took to Instagram last month to discuss her love life with fans. 

She rubbished claims linking her to Dancing on Ice partner Alexander Demetriou after he separated from his wife of four years, Carlotta Edwards, last month.

Newly-single: But it comes after Maura, 29, said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she 'needs a man'

Newly-single: But it comes after Maura, 29, said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she ‘needs a man’

Maura said during the Q and A: ‘It doesn’t bother me. We’re in 2020 and a man and woman cannot just be friends…’ 

She then zoomed in on her face and said: ‘Pure sh*** you know.’

Maura also revealed that she has struggled with adjusting to fame since leaving the Love Island villa but assured fans that she is still single. 

Asked if she would ever return to Love Island, the Irish beauty replied: ‘Well, to be honest, I need a man. So maybe I’ll go back in next year, you never know.’ 

All over: Maura's revelation comes after Dancing On Ice star Alexander Demetriou  confirmed he has separated from wife Carlotta Edwards (pictured together last November)

All over: Maura’s revelation comes after Dancing On Ice star Alexander Demetriou  confirmed he has separated from wife Carlotta Edwards (pictured together last November)

Sad times: The reality star was asked by a fan if she's bothered by the speculation surrounding her and Alexander's relationship following the news he and his wife had split

Sad times: The reality star was asked by a fan if she’s bothered by the speculation surrounding her and Alexander’s relationship following the news he and his wife had split

Confirmation: The professional skater took to Instagram stories to confirm the news and revealed to his followers that it had been a 'tough time' for him

Confirmation: The professional skater took to Instagram stories to confirm the news and revealed to his followers that it had been a ‘tough time’ for him

Last month, Alexander, 28, took to Instagram stories to confirm he had split from Carlotta amid reports that he became ‘besotted’ with Love Island beauty Maura. 

In a statement posted on Instagram stories, Alexander said: ‘I’m sorry I have been quiet on social media recently but it’s been a tough time for me personally. 

‘Carlotta and I have separated. Although it saddens me that we can no longer be together, I feel this is best for both of us.

‘I’m looking forward to what the future will bring but in the meantime let’s all say home and stay safe.’

A friend of the former couple recently told their marriage troubles ‘came as a shock’, as they were so close before the last Dancing On Ice series. 

Heartache: Maura has been single since splitting from her Love Island beau Curtis Pritchard earlier this year

Heartache: Maura has been single since splitting from her Love Island beau Curtis Pritchard earlier this year 

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Love Island’s Curtis Pritchard says he can’t face dating again after split from Maura Higgins following cheating claims | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

CURTIS PRITCHARD has revealed he is not looking for another relationship after his split from Maura Higgins.

The pair dated for eight months after meeting on last summer’s Love Island, but split in March after a series of blazing rows and public ­bust-ups. There were also accusations of cheating.

Curtis Pritchard says he can’t face dating again after split with Maura Higgins following cheating claimsCredit: Getty – Contributor

Speaking about the break-up previously, Curtis said: “It hurt. I wasn’t ready for everyone to know we had split up — I wanted some time.

“It was a shock to see that she had announced it on social media hours later.”

Curtis is now content to remain single for the time being — and insists you will not find him on a dating app any time soon.

He added: “I’m very old-fashioned. I don’t actually like talking to people over a mobile phone or laptop. I’m a very sociable person. I like to be with somebody and talk to them.”

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Maura Higgins proved popular with fans during her time in the villa and even landed herself a job on This MorningCredit: Ann Summers

When asked if he had signed up for dating apps such as Tinder, Curtis said: “No.” His older brother, who has been with girlfriend Abbie Quinnen, a fellow dancer, for two years, added: “He’s too lazy for that, honestly.”

The Pritchard brothers have revealed their “end goal” is to become a presenting duo to rival Ant and Dec.

And they are keeping their eyes firmly on that prize — with no distractions.

For dance pro AJ, quitting Strictly just weeks before the pandemic hit put a break on his ambitious career plans.

Curtis and Maura finished fourth place in the 2019 series of Love Island

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Curtis and Maura finished fourth place in the 2019 series of Love IslandCredit: Rex Features

But dancer AJ Pritchard has no regrets — and no plans to ever go back
Speaking exclusively to The Sun, the 25-year-old, who made it to the latter stages of the BBC1 series last year with YouTube star Saffron Barker said: “I made a decision and I’m very happy with that decision.

“I felt like coming out on what was a complete high.

“That last year with Saffron was a fantastic year, and if you don’t move forward and keep striving for what is your end goal,  you won’t be able to make that jump.

“To wait another year just didn’t feel right for me. I won’t ever go back.”

AJ says that he is happy with his decision to quite Strictly and has no regrets

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AJ says that he is happy with his decision to quite Strictly and has no regretsCredit: Getty – Contributor

AJ was the second big Strictly name to announce their departure this year, after Kevin Clifton quit the show in March.

In his four years there, AJ’s highest finish was fourth with Team GB gymnast Claudia Fragapane in 2016.

However, his most memorable series came the following year with singer Mollie King from The Saturdays, as the pair were rumoured to be getting close away from the dance floor.

TV chiefs are still trying to replace AJ and Kevin for the upcoming series, which is set to go ahead despite the complications from Covid-19.

The dancer says he will never go back to the show as he is ready to move on

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The dancer says he will never go back to the show as he is ready to move on

AJ is backing plans for the show to return, but admits there will obviously be draw-backs.

He  says: “There are things you can do to still work with social distancing, whether that be dances like the Charleston or jive.

“You can create routines where you don’t have to be close together. I think the professional group numbers are the one thing that could fall short this year. Usually the professionals learn them as a group.”

And he joked: “You could replay all the numbers from the past few years — and then I’ll be back on the TV.”

‘WE WANT TO BE LIKE ANT & DEC’

In recent months, AJ and Curtis have got a taste of their dream jobs as a presenting duo with an appearance on the BBC’s Big Night In charity appeal for those affected by coronavirus.

But their ultimate aim is to bag a prime-time Saturday night variety show, such as Britain’s Got Talent, which AJ appeared on as a contestant in 2013 with dance partner Chloe Hewitt.

AJ said: “Our aim is to get roles on big shiny floor TV shows and to become a household name as presenters.

“We want to definitely get our own shows commissioned and be like Ant and Dec.

The brothers have big dreams of becoming TV regulars like Ant and Dec

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The brothers have big dreams of becoming TV regulars like Ant and Dec

“My first TV appearance was on Britain’s Got Talent. Doing some presenting on a variety show like that would be an absolute dream for me.”

The boys were tight-lipped on whether they had been in any meetings to discuss their own series yet, but did confirm nothing had been commissioned.

Curtis added: “We would absolutely love to be presenters.

“BGT is a prestigious and incredible show so hosting something like that would be a bit of a dream come true.”

‘I NEVER WANTED TO BE LABELLED DYSLEXIC’

But with both boys suffering from dyslexia, reading autocues on live shows can be extremely difficult.

Instead, they have to learn their lines ahead of time.

AJ said: “Reading the full text and learning lines can be difficult with dyslexia.

“We do work that bit harder, but I think that TV producers see that and adapt to work with us.”

The pair hosted the BBC's Big Night In to help riase funds and fight Covid-19

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The pair hosted the BBC’s Big Night In to help riase funds and fight Covid-19

The boys, who this month became ambassadors for the British Dyslexia Association, credit their dyslexia with making them creative people and for steering them towards dancing.

But they were not always pleased with being a bit different.Curtis said: “I never wanted to be labelled dyslexic for a couple of reasons.

“I was scared of it and I thought it was a bad thing —  that I’ve got a problem or something, when in reality I couldn’t have been more wrong because it moulded me into the person I am today.

“And really it’s actually made me more creative and expressive and more knowledgeable.” With their creativity and upbeat attitude, all the brothers need now is for the TV industry to come back to full strength after lockdown.

And they are confident it will.

AJ said: “We’re both in the same mindset to move forward with that career.

“But the entertainment side will bounce back because people need to be entertained and want to have fun.”

AJ &amp; Curtis Pritchard get the nation dancing for the NHS

GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk

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#computersecurity | #comptia | Ageing devices biggest threat to cybersecurity as work from home becomes norm – | #cybersecurity | #informationsecurity

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The IT companies are contemplating over extending this arrangement even after COVID-19 infections reduce. But, most companies agree to cybersecurity threat being a sword hanging over their heads

Rukmini Rao        Last Updated: June 10, 2020  | 18:54 IST

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • In 2019, network infra assets of 47.9% businesses aged or turned obsolete
  • Ageing and obsolete devices in technology sector at 59.6%
  • Redirection of spend towards cloud services is resulting in decreased investment

Various sectors across the globe are slowing and in a staggered fashion opening up after nearly five months of lockdown, perhaps with the only exception of information technology sector, which adapted to a different working model to tide over the crisis. The IT companies are contemplating over extending this arrangement even after COVID-19 infections reduce. But, most companies agree to cybersecurity threat being a sword hanging over their heads. However, a recent report by NTT Ltd shows the root cause of cybersecurity threat having substantially increased is perhaps the obsolete or ageing devices.

“The assets of 47.9 per cent  organisations were ageing or turning obsolete as a weighted average, representing a significant surge from 2017, when this figure was just 13.1 per cent. Both connectivity and security are being compromised by enterprises leaving obsolete devices on the network,” the report  said. While the industry average in the use of obsolete and ageing devices is 47.9 per cent, public sector leads the way with 61.7 per cent, and surprisingly close second is the technology sector with 59.6 per cent of devices either ageing or turning obsolete. On an average, an obsolete device has twice as many vulnerabilities per device (42.2 per cent) compared to ageing (26.8 per cent) and current devices (19.4 per cent). Interestingly, the report says that around 2015-16,  businesses started investing and deploying new technology and spending on new devices peaked in 2017 when there were 86.9 per cent of organisations with current (latest) devices. Even as adoption of new wireless infrastructure is on the rise, with an average increase of over 13 per cent year-on-year, ageing and obsolete devices create security vulnerabilities and put businesses at risk of cyber attacks with people logging in from co-working spaces and remote work locations.

One of the biggest reasons behind the lower investment in  on-premises infrastructure, according to report, is the growth in cloud spend outpacing that in overall IT spend. This is what is leading to lower investments. Cloud adoption and spend were predicted to grow at a faster rate and in the region of 21-25 per cent CAGR until 2023. “The increase in on-premises, ageing and obsolete devices is partially due to a redirection of spend towards Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and other cloud services, which results in a decrease in investment in on-premises infrastructure. However, we anticipate that there will be a significant increase in people working from home, even after pandemic reduction measures are lifted,” the report said.

Also Read: Coronavirus treatment cost: Tamil Nadu hospitals can’t charge above Rs 15,000 a day

Also Read: Vizag gas leak: Andhra govt forms committee to probe incident; seeks report by June 22

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#onlinedating | UMD professor Jonathan England remembered as loving father, fierce ally to black community | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

At night, before his sons went to sleep, Jonathan England would tell them stories of “Tio Campanero” — a character of his own invention. 

The stories usually came along with a moral, his wife, Adrienne England, remembered. Some were about being kind, while others were about being a good sport. Their children can be competitive, she explained, and don’t like to lose. 

“He was just very proud of our children,” Adrienne said. “He really enjoyed being a father.”

Jonathan England’s colleagues and students in the University of Maryland’s African American Studies department knew this well. During Zoom meetings, even though his daughter and three boys could often be seen in the background, he never shooed them away. His love for them was always so obvious — he would talk about them in the classroom, positively beaming.

Now, all who knew and loved England are grieving his loss. He died from a heart attack on June 1 at the age of 47.

When England’s friends, coworkers and students talk about him, they remember him as someone who loved people deep down to his core. Someone who was the textbook example of an ally — a white person who never overstepped in his activism. A fiercely devoted professor and mentor.

But to his wife, England was loving and selfless, a man who always put his family before himself. He was the smartest person she knew, she said, with a memory that often helped them take home a win on trivia night.

They met on an online dating site in February 2007, when Adrienne was 27 and England was 34. While Adrienne doesn’t remember what his bio said, she remembers it made her laugh out loud — as he would continue to do for their nearly 12 years of marriage. 

Adrienne still remembers when she took her daughter, Ryann, to meet England for the first time. Her daughter was about 5 years old then, rolling around on her Heelys. The whole time, England was worried she would get herself hurt, Adrienne said. 

“Our daughter was not his stepdaughter,” Adrienne said. “She was always his daughter.”

As Ryann grew up, England would take her to the park, where they would shoot hoops, challenging one another. Now, Ryann is 18 and plays basketball for East Carolina University — but England still liked to pretend he could beat her, Adrienne said. 

He would joke around, talking about the days he almost had a basketball career and how everything fell apart after he sprained his ankle. 

“He was very silly,” Adrienne said. 

[“Beyond tired”: UMD students organize protest against systemic racism, police brutality]

England never told her why he decided to devote his career to African American Studies, Adrienne said. But Jason Nichols, an African American Studies lecturer, knew that his activism was not driven by guilt or pity. It was driven by love.

“He was aware of his own whiteness in a way where it wasn’t patronizing,” Nichols recalled. “He was literally concerned for the well-being of his fellow human beings.”

Love: that’s what characterized England, said Kim Nickerson, assistant dean for diversity, equity and inclusion in the behavioral and social sciences college.

“His love for people and the topics that remain close to his heart just drove him to be the great professor, friend and administrator that he was,” he said. 

And at a time when protests against police brutality and systemic racism are sweeping the country, his death is especially tragic, said Mike Locksley, this university’s football coach. 

For two weeks now, people have taken to the streets to demand justice for George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee to his neck for almost nine minutes. In that time, there has been a spike in interest in podcasts, documentaries and books that explain the deep-rooted nature of racism in the U.S. and spell out how to be “anti-racist.”

“I know he would be one of the first people out there championing and lecturing and educating people,” Locksley said. 

For one of England’s former students, Brittney Woods, the professor’s allyship could be traced down to how he saw people. He never ignored their skin color, but he focused on their humanity, Woods said. 

Some suggested that England’s passion for African American Studies might come from where he grew up. From the first time Nichols talked to England — when Nichols was a sophomore at the university and England was a teaching assistant — he said he could tell where England was from.

“He had the whole Prince George’s County kind of swagger,” he said.

England’s roots sunk deep down into his choice of slang, which he transformed into an inside joke with his students and colleagues by exposing the “bama of the week” on social media. 

 “Bama” is the Prince George’s way of calling someone dumb, explained Marci Deloatch, coordinator and business manager for the African American Studies department. Sometimes, she said, England would call out a politician who said something they shouldn’t have. Other times, he’d share a funny local news story.

England’s bama of the week came up more than once at a vigil the university held for him June 2. There, dozens of students, faculty and alumni remembered him as a kind and supportive professor. For Woods, though, he was more than that. It was almost like he was magical.

His class felt different than any she had ever taken before, Woods said. He allowed students to have organic conversations about current events, tying everything back to the course material. And, she said, he was able to connect concepts to his students’ daily lives.

Most of the time, when Nickerson glanced into classrooms as he walked past, students would be on their phones or about to fall asleep. That wasn’t the case for England’s classes, though. 

“People were like they were at a concert,” Nickerson said. 

[Prince George’s County board of education takes steps to sever ties with county police]

At home, Adrienne often watched England plan his classes. He wanted to make a difference, she said; he wanted to reach students. He would jot down ideas on little note cards, thinking up topics to discuss with his students and ways to engage them. Adrienne would sometimes take a peek at the cards to try to decipher what he was up to. 

“His handwriting was very difficult to read,” she said, laughing. “He should have been a doctor.”

But Jonathan’s magic did not end in the classroom — it followed his students for life.

Woods currently works as a yoga instructor, she said, and is trying to figure out how to use her degree in African American Studies to promote wellness. As she navigated adulthood, she said England would check in on her. “I see what you’re doing,” she said he’d tell her. “I’m proud of you.”

A month ago, the coronavirus pandemic had forced Woods to move her instruction online. One of her new students was England. He tried to get the whole family involved, too, Adrienne remembered. As England mirrored Woods’ poses, the boys sat by his side for as long as their attention span allowed. 

“I had memories of him as an undergrad student, but now I have memories of him supporting me in my adult career, in my adult endeavors,” she said. “It’s really powerful.”

And for Jamie Tyson, England was a sort of father figure. The last part of the spring semester was especially rough for her, she said, but England was there for her. He always was. 

Back when she was England’s teaching assistant last fall, she’d always come to class with coffee and breakfast. Sometimes, England would ask about her favorite order from Starbucks and Chick-fil-a. Then, on the last day of the class, he surprised her with both.

“The way that he supported everyone and especially me — that’s something I’m definitely going to carry within me,” said Tyson, a rising senior African American Studies major.

England was a teacher for Adrienne, too, she said. He would explain what was going on in the news or aspects of the law she did not fully understand. It’s going to be different, she said, not having him here with her at a time when the nation is in turmoil.

But he did leave her with an important lesson about what will bring change in this country, she said: voting. He taught her that if you don’t use your voice, you won’t be heard, she said.

And the night before he died, England left one final lesson to the world.

“Systemic change requires acknowledgement that the system does not work. Which requires acknowledgement that the system was never designed to work for all,” he wrote on Twitter. “When those who benefit have that moment of honesty perhaps things can begin to change.”

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