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Hackers #access patient #data at #Oklahoma State #facility

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hackers attacked Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, and some 279,865 individuals have been notified that their protected health information may have been compromised.

The organization learned on Nov. 7, 2017, that an unauthorized party had gained access to data on the computer network that contained Medicaid billing information. The university removed the data from the network and the unauthorized access was terminated; and forensic specialists were called in to help determine the extent of compromise.

The investigation could not determine with certainty whether patient information was accessed, the university told affected patients in a notification letter.

Compromised data included patient names, Medicaid numbers, healthcare provider names, dates of service and limited treatment information, along with one Social Security number. To date, there is no indication of inappropriate use of patient information, according to the university.

“At OSU Center for Health Sciences, we care deeply about our patients,” the notification letter states. “Patient confidentiality is a critical part of our commitment to care, and we work diligently to protect patient information. We apologize for any concern or inconvenience this incident may cause our patients.”

A dedicated call center has been established for patients to get more information, and patients are urged to be on alert for any healthcare services they incur that they did not actually receive from their providers, and immediately contact their providers and Medicaid.

The university is not offering credit monitoring services to affected individuals, since no financial information was exposed; the one individual whose Social Security number may have been compromised was given credit protection services.

The post Hackers #access patient #data at #Oklahoma State #facility appeared first on National Cyber Security .

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15-year-old Unpatched Root Access Bug found in Apple’s macOS

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

After a disastrous 2017, where Apple faced all sorts of security-related issues and complaints, the company is in trouble again right from the first day of the New Year! On the very first day of 2018 (or the last day of 2017, depending on your location and region), a security researcher having immense expertise in hacking Apple’s iOS has posted details of an unpatched security flaw present in macOS operating system.

“One tiny, ugly bug. Fifteen years. Full system compromise” wrote the researcher, who uses the alias Siguza (s1guza).

The researcher stated that the flaw can be exploited by cyber-crooks to gain full control of the computer. The unpatched zero-day vulnerability is claimed to be 15 years old. The researcher has also posted a proof-of-concept exploit code, which can be reviewed on GitHub.

Siguza, who also calls himself Hobbyist Hacker, noted that this is a dangerous local privilege escalation (LPE) flaw, which allows anyone (even an unprivileged attacker) to obtain root access on the targeted computer so as to execute malicious code. This LPE flaw affects the kernel extension IOHIDFamily, which was designed for HID (human interface device) like touchscreen or buttons.

Furthermore, the malware that has been designed to exploit this 0-day vulnerability can install itself deep into the system and cybercriminals can target Apple’s critical security programs like the System Integrity Protection (SIP) and Apple Mobile File Integrity (AMFI).

In order to successfully carry out the exploitation of the system, cybercriminals need to get users logged out from the system, which is likely to alert most of the users. However, to evade detection, cybercriminals can attack when the system is shut down or restarted.

The flaw was discovered when Siguza was trying to identify flaws that would allow him to hack the iOS kernel. While doing so Siguze noticed that some of the extension’s components including the IOHIDSystem existed solely on macOS. This discovery led to the identification of the critical zero-day vulnerability in the operating system. Siguza wrote in his post:

“Needs to be running on the host already (nothing remote), achieves full system compromise by itself, but logs you out in the process.”

“Can wait for logout though and is fast enough to run on shutdown/reboot until 10.13.1. On 10.13.2 it takes a fair bit longer (maybe half a minute) after logging out, so if your OS logs you out unexpectedly… maybe pull the plug?” explained Siguza.

The vulnerability is found only in macOS and not in other Apple products such as the iOS but it affects all versions of macOS. Although the flaw is not too serious and concerning it does show that Apple needs to enhance the security of its software. The proof-of-concept created by Siguza is applicable on macOS High Sierra 10.13.1 and earlier versions but he believes that the exploit can be tweaked to become effective on a new version of macOS 10.13.2 released on Dec 6.

Siguza further added that the reason why he publicly announced his findings instead of informing Apple secretly is that the flaw was not remotely exploitable and Apple’s bug bounty program also didn’t cover macOS. Apple, on the other hand, hasn’t responded to the news or released any statement in relation to the findings of Siguza. We will update the article when Apple responds.

The post 15-year-old Unpatched Root Access Bug found in Apple’s macOS appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Hackers Obtained #Access to #NSA Employee’s Home #Computer, #Kaspersky Lab Reveals

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Kaspersky Lab has updated its investigation on the hacking of a home computer used by an NSA employee.

MOSCOW (Sputnik) — Kaspersky IT security company has announced that access to information on the home computer of the employee of the US National Security Agency (NSA) could have been obtained by an unknown number of hackers.

According to the Kaspersky Lab probe that is linked to media reports about the company’s software allegedly having been used to search and download classified information from the home computer of a NSA employee, the user’s computer was infected with Mokes backdoor, a malware that allows the hackers to obtain access to a device.

“The malware… was a full blown backdoor which may have allowed third parties access to the user’s machine,” the Kaspersky Lab has stated.

However, it is possible that Mokes was not the only malware that infected the computer in question, the company said, adding that while Kaspersky software on the computer was enabled, it reported 121 alarms on different types of malware.

“The interesting thing about this malware is that it was available for purchase on Russian underground forums in 2011. Also noteworthy is that the command-and-control servers of this malware were registered to a (presumably) Chinese entity going by the name ‘Zhou Lou’ during the period of September to November 2014,” the statement explained.

Allegations Against Kaspersky Lab

The internal investigation by Kaspersky Lab was launched after The Wall Street Journal reported in October that a group of hackers allegedly working for the Russian officials had stolen classified data through the National Security Agency (NSA) contractor, which used antivirus software made by the Russian software producer.

Shortly later, the New York Times reported that Israeli intelligence services have hacked into the network of Kaspersky, and warned their US colleagues that the Russian government was allegedly using Kaspersky software to gain access to computers around the world, including in several US government agencies.

Both reports came a month after the US Department of Homeland Security ordered state agencies and departments to stop using Kaspersky Lab software within the next 90  days, with the company’s CEO Eugene Kaspersky refuting all the allegations spread by the media regarding the Russian cybersecurity company’s involvement in spying on US users through its products and calling such claims groundless and paranoiac.

When commenting on the situation in an interview to Die Zeit newspaper, Eugene Kaspersky has, “There is a feeling that we just had been doing our job better than others, that we had been protecting our clients better than others … Probably, someone in the United States is very unhappy about it.”

Most recently, Wikileaks has revealed that the CIA had written a code to “impersonate” Russia-based Kaspersky Lab, which had been used at least three times.

READ MORE: WikiLeaks: CIA Wrote Code to ‘Impersonate’ Russia-Based Kaspersky Lab

Kaspersky Lab is one of the largest private cybersecurity companies in the world, with its technologies protecting over 400 million users and 270,000 corporate clients.

The post Hackers Obtained #Access to #NSA Employee’s Home #Computer, #Kaspersky Lab Reveals appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Russian Hackers Tried to Access California Election System

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla said he was informed “for the first time” by the DHS on Friday of last year’s attempt, in which Russian hackers “scanned” the website with the intent to “identify weaknesses in a computer or network – akin to a burglar looking for unlocked doors…

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Hackers could gain access to passwords through USB sticks, cyber experts warn

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Using a USB stick that’s been left lying around is something many, if not most, of us have done — probably without thinking twice about it. But cybersecurity experts are warning against the practice after showing hackers can access personal information through malicious USB sticks which then transmit that information…

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Smart TV hack embeds attack code into broadcast signal—no access required

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Smart TV hack embeds attack code into broadcast signal—no access required

A new attack that uses terrestrial radio signals to hack a wide range of Smart TVs raises an unsettling prospect—the ability of hackers to take complete control of a large number of sets at once without having physical access to any of them. The proof-of-concept exploit uses a low-cost transmitter…

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Malicious Android malware lets hackers access your phone’s connected network

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Malicious Android malware lets hackers access your phone’s connected network

Security researchers have discovered a new strain of malware that turns Android devices into backdoors, giving malicious attackers the ability to access any internal network that the infected device is …

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Technology Information Security Officer (Identity Access Management) – AVP

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Technology Information Security Officer (Identity Access Management) – AVP

Primary Location: United States,Texas,Irving Other Location: United States,Florida,Tampa Education: Bachelor’s Degree Job Function: Technology Schedule: Full-time Shift: Day Job Employee Status: Regular Travel Time: No   Description   About Citi Citi, the leading global bank, has approximately 200 million customer …

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Turkey Blocking Access to Social Media After Assassination of Russian Ambassador

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Turkey Blocking Access to Social Media After Assassination of Russian Ambassador

The Turkish government appears to be blocking access to social media networks and messaging apps like Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp in the aftermath of the assassination of the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Turkey Block reports.
The monitoring network says it

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‘Unprecedented access to info’ New facial recognition system starts up

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

‘Unprecedented access to info’ New facial recognition system starts up

What if your Facebook and Insta pics ended up in a facial recognition system intended to stop terrorism? And what if those pics could be shared between government agencies as a way of verifying that you are who you say

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