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Dating apps are growing and becoming more virtual amid the pandemic | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Insider Intelligence publishes thousands of research reports, charts, and forecasts on the Media, Advertising, and Marketing industry. You can learn more about becoming a client here. The following is a […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Monsoon floods push millions of children into uncertainty amid COVID-19 – Bangladesh | #covid19 | #kids | #childern | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Monsoon floods push millions of children into uncertainty amid COVID-19 – Bangladesh | #covid19 | #kids | #childern | Parent Security Online ✕ Parent Security Online […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#childsafety | What It’s Like to Relocate and Reopen Your Small Business Amid a Pandemic | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Jessica Richards, the owner of Shen Beauty, tells Allure, in her own words, what it was like to relocate and reopen her beloved Brooklyn salon and shop during the pandemic, […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#childsafety | Is Trick-or-Treating Safe Amid the COVID Pandemic? We Asked a Pediatrician For Advice | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Like most events and holidays that have taken place amid the COVID pandemic, Halloween is going to look a lot different this year. Obviously, kids trick or treat outside, which […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#onlinedating | The Echelon Way launches a new way for Pittsburgh singles to connect virtually amid COVID-19 restrictions | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Matthew Garcia, Marketing Manager at The Echelon Way Wade Redcross, CEO/Founder at The Echelon Way Pittsburgh, PA, Aug. 25, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Although COVID-19 has caused many people to […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#sextrafficking | Juan Carlos, Spain’s Former King, Quits Country Amid Multiple Investigations | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

_________________________ The former king of Spain, Juan Carlos, announced on Monday he was abandoning his country amid a Spanish court investigation into a lucrative business contract and a separate money […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#hacker | #government | Trump publicly urges China to investigate Bidens amid impeachment inquiry

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Thursday urged another foreign government to probe former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter, saying the Chinese government should look into Hunter Biden’s involvement with an investment fund that raised money in the country.

“China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine,” Trump told reporters outside the White House.

While Trump said he hasn’t asked Chinese President Xi Jinping to investigate the Bidens, the public call mirrors the private behavior on which Democrats are partially basing their impeachment inquiry — using the office of the presidency to press a foreign leader to investigate a political rival.

It is “certainly something we can start thinking about, because I’m sure that President Xi does not like being on that kind of scrutiny, where billions of dollars is taken out of his country by a guy that just got kicked out of the Navy,” Trump said Thursday of asking China to probe the Bidens. “He got kicked out of the Navy, all of the sudden he’s getting billions of dollars. You know what they call that? They call that a payoff.”

The U.S. in the midst of a tense trade war with China. The president, discussing progress on negotiations with Beijing on a possible trade agreement just moments before his remarks about the Bidens, told reporters that “if they don’t do what we want, we have tremendous power.”

Chinese officials will be in Washington next week in another attempt to revive talks, Trump said.

Trump, seeking to expand his corruption accusations against the Bidens beyond Ukraine, has in recent days repeatedly accused Hunter Biden of using a 2013 trip on Air Force Two with his father, then the vice president, to procure $1.5 billion from China for a private equity fund he had started.

Prior to Thursday, Trump had not called for an investigation into the matter. The White House declined to comment on Trump’s remarks.

Despite Trump’s accusations, there has been no evidence of corruption on the part of the former vice president or his son. In a statement, Biden’s deputy campaign manager and communications director, Kate Bedingfield, said the president “is flailing and melting down on national television, desperately clutching for conspiracy theories that have been debunked and dismissed by independent, credible news organizations.”

“As Joe Biden forcefully said last night, the defining characteristic of Donald Trump’s presidency is the ongoing abuse of power,” Bedingfield said. “What Donald Trump just said on the South Lawn of the White House was this election’s equivalent of his infamous ‘Russia, if you’re listening’ moment from 2016 — a grotesque choice of lies over truth and self over the country.”

Trump, during a 2016 campaign rally, encouraged the country to meddle in the 2016 election by trying to access Hillary Clinton’s emails, saying, “Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing.”

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation found that within hours of Trump’s invitation, Russian military intelligence initiated a hack against Clinton’s office. Trump and his allies have said he wasn’t serious when he made the comment.

In pushing back on Trump, Biden’s campaign previously pointed to a fact-check from The Washington Post that found Trump’s claims false while tracing the origins of the $1.5 billion figure he has used to a 2018 book by conservative author Peter Schweizer.

In addition, Hunter Biden’s spokesman, George Mesires, told NBC News previously that Hunter Biden wasn’t initially an “owner” of the company and has never gotten paid for serving on the board. He said Hunter Biden didn’t acquire an equity interest in the fund until 2017, after his father had left office.

And when he did, he put in only about $420,000 — a 10 percent interest. That puts the total capitalization of the fund at the time at about $4.2 million — a far cry from the $1.5 billion that Trump has alleged.

Trump also said Thursday that he still wants Ukraine to conduct “a major investigation” into Joe and Hunter Biden.

“I would think that if they were honest about it, they would start a major investigation into the Bidens,” he said, adding, “They should investigate the Bidens.”

House Democrats have launched a formal impeachment inquiry against Trump centered on a July 25 phone call between him and the president of Ukraine during which Trump asked his Ukrainian counterpart to investigate the family of the former vice president, Trump’s possible 2020 opponent. The House is also looking into whether Giuliani’s overtures were proper and whether the White House was using almost $400 million in frozen aid to Ukraine as leverage.

The White House has since released a detailed description of the July call, while the House Intelligence Committee made public a lightly redacted version of the intelligence community whistleblower complaint that brought to light the allegations against Trump. The complaint alleged that Trump, in the July phone call, used the power of his office “to solicit interference from a foreign country” in the 2020 election.

The impeachment inquiry has unleashed a torrent of activity in the House and key cabinet agencies.

House Democrats have so far issued subpoenas for Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani as well as for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for Ukraine-related documents. They have also threatened the White House with subpoenas for Ukraine-related documents. And on Thursday, the Department of Defense said its general counsel had directed all agency offices and leadership to turn over any pertinent information dealing with military funding to Ukraine.

Democrats, meanwhile, immediately excoriated Trump’s latest comments Thursday as “unacceptable” and “indefensible,” suggesting that the president is only strengthening their case for impeachment.

“The president cannot use the power of his office to pressure foreign leaders to investigate his political opponents. His rant this morning reinforces the urgency of our work. America is a Republic, if we can keep it.” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said in a tweet.

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., tweeted: “This is absolutely unacceptable. It’s clear the president understands he’s been caught red-handed and has now moved to normalize this kind of corrupt behavior.”

“GOP must speak out,” he added.

Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., also had a message for Republican lawmakers.

“To my Republican colleagues, I implore you to listen to the words that came out of Trumps’ mouth this morning. From the SOUTH LAWN OF THE WHITE HOUSE,” he said on Twitter. “Think about the detrimental impact these actions will have on our democracy and our national security. This is indefensible.”

The remarks also elicited the attention of the top elections official in the U.S., Federal Election Commission Chair Ellen Weintraub, who re-shared a tweet she had posted in June explaining that “it is illegal for any person to solicit, accept, or receive anything of value from a foreign national in connection with a U.S. election.”

Weintraub had initially posted the tweet in June, after Trump said he’d consider taking information on opponents from other countries.

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Florida push to become #bigger player in #cybersecurity comes amid #tough #competition

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Florida push to become #bigger player in #cybersecurity comes amid #tough #competition

Florida probably isn’t the first place that comes to mind in terms of a strong cybersecurity industry. In fact, it has a somewhat insecure reputation — the Sunshine State had the second highest rate for identity theft complaints in 2016, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

But local stakeholders are looking to change that, and Florida is making slow but incremental progress on a few fronts.

“The mission that was given to us is make Florida the leading state in cybersecurity,” said Sri Sridharan, executive director of the Florida Center for Cybersecurity.

The University of South Florida-affiliated center, which is hosting its annual cybersecurity conference Friday, was established by the Florida legislature in 2014 to “position Florida as a national leader in cybersecurity.”

That title comes amid stiff competition. The Northeast and California have deeply established communities for cybersecurity, anchored around schools — such as Johns Hopkins University or Carnegie Mellon University — or natural hubs — government agencies in Washington, D.C., and tech giants in Silicon Valley.

What the state lacks currently, said Sridharan, is a talent pool of mid-career professionals who already have strong training.

But Florida isn’t completely out of this game. Firms such as Tampa-based ReliaQuest have set up shop in the state. IBM, which has a focus on cybersecurity, has an established presence in the state with an office in Tampa. And KnowBe4, a Clearwater-based cybersecurity training firm, announced this week that it received a $30 million investment from Goldman Sachs Growth Equity.

What Florida may have to offer is its large student population and amenable business climate.

Education is the cornerstone of local stakeholders’ efforts to put Florida on the digital security map.

Florida currently has 13 schools that the National Security Agency has designated as centers of academic excellence in cybersecurity education or research. Around 40 cybersecurity-related programs for graduate and undergraduate studies have been implemented in Florida state colleges.

“Students learn cybersecurity very easily,” Sridharan said.

His approach at the Florida Center for Cybersecurity is to get schools and students on board with cyber, and shape the curriculum around what the industry currently wants.

“Will you hire them?” That’s the question Sridharan asked of 18 security employers when USF was shaping its curriculum.

Training the workforce early — as early as kindergarten and grade school — is also a priority.

While the center hosts boot camps for high school students, digital security company ReliaQuest recently set up shop in JA Biztown, a Junior Achievement play city where students take charge for a day to learn economic concepts.

ReliaQuest’s storefront mimics the company’s real office. Their youth “employees” help other businesses in the town identify and fix security issues on their equipment.

“They’re using devices more than we are,” ReliaQuest CEO Brian Murphy said. If kids can build good digital security habits now, he said, when they are older, “they can operate devices with a professional skepticism.”

Beyond education, entrepreneurs such as Adam Sheffield, a former intelligence collector for the Army, are looking to supplement the academic approach here by creating a cybersecurity hub.

Sheffield is working on hosting “boot camp-style” training programs, meet-ups and events in Ybor City, calling the concept “Cybor.”

One area for improvement is Florida’s privacy climate. Industry professionals often consider security and privacy to go hand in hand, and state laws often shape how companies approach issues such as securing personal information and disclosing to consumers when their data has been leaked.

“A lot of it has to do with the attorney generals involved,” said Bob Siegel, president of Delray Beach-based Privacy Ref.

Siegel is a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals and part of their training faculty.

One of the reasons California has become a privacy and security hub, Siegel said, is because of its attorney general’s strong stance toward digital privacy.

California is considered to have some of the most consumer-friendly privacy laws. It requires companies that operate in the state to post a particular notice about how they respond to consumers’ Internet browser’s requests to not be tracked with digital cookies. It also allows children under 18 years old to have their personal information deleted from social media networks.

But Florida, he said, is slightly less progressive in this area. For example, the state data breach law considers an information leak to be a “data breach” if the information was electronic. That doesn’t account for information on paper, such as paper forms filled out.

The post Florida push to become #bigger player in #cybersecurity comes amid #tough #competition appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Officials push cybersecurity education amid rise in malicious attacks

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans SALT LAKE CITY — Digital security breaches that impact megacompanies like Equifax, Sony or Yahoo tend to dominate headlines when they occur, but it’s far more common for small businesses to fall victim to cybercriminals and, when they do, the results are typically far more catastrophic. […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Bug took Apple’s Developer website down amid hacking fears

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

After several developers reported a possible security breach in Apple’s Developer website as their account addresses showed an address in Russia, Apple has said the problem originated owing to a bug in its account management application. According to a MacRumours report on Thursday, several developers reported that all of their…

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