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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Pitney Bowes Hit In Ransomware Attack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Shipping and technology behemoth Pitney Bowes is the latest in a string of high-profile companies to be hit in a cyberattack.

TechCrunch reported that the company was hit with a ransomware attack.

“Pitney Bowes was affected by a malware attack that encrypted information on some systems and disrupted customer access to our services,” the company said on Monday (Oct. 14). “At this time, the company has seen no evidence that customer or employee data has been improperly accessed. Our technical team is working to restore the affected systems, and it is working closely with third-party consultants to address this matter. We are considering all options to expedite this process and we appreciate our customers’ patience as we work toward a resolution.”

In the past few months, Arizona Beverages, science company Eurofins, and a company that makes aluminum called Norsk Hydro, have all been targeted.

The FBI recently warned that “high impact” attacks would be hitting large companies.

“Ransomware attacks are becoming more targeted, sophisticated, and costly, even as the overall frequency of attacks remains consistent,” the FBI said in the warning. “Since early 2018, the incidence of broad, [indiscriminate] ransomware campaigns has sharply declined, but the losses from ransomware attacks have increased significantly, according to complaints received by IC3 and FBI case information.”

It’s not yet known exactly what type of ransomware has affected Pitney Bowes, but it said it’s working with a third-party consultant on the issue.

The company has more than 1.5 million clients across the globe, some of which are Fortune 500 companies. It helps sellers with mailing and shipping needs with a goal of improving efficiency, and sellers on marketplace platforms like Etsy and Shopify use it often.

Several users of the service complained about not being able to perform basic maintenance of their accounts, according to TechCrunch.

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#computersecurity | ANU cyber attack: How hackers got inside Australia’s top uni

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

news, latest-news, anu hack, anu data breach, anu hack 2019, china hacks ANU, who hacked ANU, Australian National University, anu cyber attack, anu student staff data stolen

It’s been compared to Ocean’s Eleven – a cyber attack on Australia’s top university, methodically planned and then adapted on the fly by an “A team” of hackers who cracked into the personal records of 200,000 students and staff and walked away leaving virtually no trace. The operation was so slick investigators claim they still don’t know if the breach was the work of a foreign state, even as its “shocking” sophistication throws suspicion on China. But the hack didn’t go entirely to plan. Now, after months of forensic analysis, the Australian National University has revealed it’s likely the hackers “didn’t get what they wanted” from its records after all. They were foiled in the act – and it was entirely by accident. On Wednesday, the university released a post-mortem of the hack and how staff responded – the first public report of its kind into an Australian cyber attack. It describes a highly professional operation, likely of up to 15 people “working round the clock” to harvest data and build custom malware within the network itself. Hackers evolved, covered their tracks and returned for fresh attacks when a scheduled fire wall unexpected booted them out, in a campaign the university says was remarkably more sophisticated and “distinct” from an earlier breach involving national defence research in 2018. If the university hadn’t been cleaning up after that hack, where nothing was stolen but suspicion also fell heavily on China, it’s unlikely staff would have discovered this second breach when they did. “Frustratingly” the ANU says it doesn’t have enough evidence to point the finger at anyone this time around, not even organised crime – security teams now scouring the dark web for the stolen data have turned up nothing so far. Director of defence, strategy and national security at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Michael Shoebridge has read the report closely (“It’s bit like CSI Miami”) and thinks China remains the most likely suspect – both for its well-known cyber capability and its interest in harvesting human intelligence on Australian government officials and researchers known to orbit the ANU. So how did the hackers get in and what clues did they leave behind? According to the report, which was developed in collaboration with Australia’s security agencies, the intrusion was first discovered in April, during a routine security sweep. A small army of cyber experts descended on the campus and the hunt began in earnest, with staff realising on May 17 someone hadn’t just been in the house, they’d been robbed. More than two weeks later, vice-chancellor Brian Schmidt went public with the news: the university had been hacked for the second time in less than a year. Nineteen years’ worth of HR data had been compromised. The final report now revises down that figure considerably – while hackers got into that database, analysts believe they stolen only a fraction of that, or roughly the same amount you can store on a CD. But to date investigators are still not sure exactly how much data was taken – or why. Professor Schmidt handed down the report on Wednesday with an apology to students and staff and a call to break the silence surrounding attacks of this kind. He said he hoped its detail would encourage disclosure about hacks more broadly, rather than providing an “instruction manual”. In the interest of transparency, only a small number of very specific details were omitted to prevent copycats. The hack was so sophisticated it “has shocked even the most experienced Australian security experts”, Professor Schmidt said, though he acknowledged the university “could have done more”. “This wasn’t a smash and grab, it was a diamond heist,” he said. “It’s likely they spent months planning this. They were organised and everyone knew their role.” It began, as many attacks do, with a seemingly innocuous email sent to a senior staff member in November 2018. The staffer wasn’t on campus at the time so it was read by a colleague. And they didn’t open the attachment. But this was something a little more sophisticated than the usual nefarious traffic the university deflects from its inboxes (ANU blocks 5000 intrusions attempts a day). Just previewing this email’s attachment was enough to deliver the malware and steal senior login credentials. And the hackers had their first door in. “The fact they got in without anyone actually clicking on an email, that wasn’t widely known around the traps,” Professor Schmidt says. “We were sort of ground zero for that.” From there, investigators think hackers must have gotten got lucky – an inside job has now been ruled out. The thieves managed to find an old legacy server due to be decommissioned within the year and it was there that they built their base of operations, installing “shadow infrastructure” to cloak their movements on the network as they hunted for a way into its more secure databases. Investigators say they are confident they know what the hackers were after – the HR files – because they made a beeline for that part of the network to the exclusion of other areas like research, much of which they had also gained access to. While the hackers ran extensive software to clean up their trail, university analysts believe they would have found traces elsewhere, as they did with the HR database, if they had been busy in more than one place. Instead, even when inside the network, they used password cracking software and kept running email “spear-phishing” campaigns like the one that first worked in November – trying to sniff out the right credentials to access the closed HR system, and eventually taking a final, desperate run at the IT department itself. Once they broke into the HR database through a previously unknown vulnerability, hackers used their own custom-made software to scrape its data so detail of exactly what was taken wouldn’t appear on ANU logs. But university investigators are confident the amount taken was much smaller than they originally thought – megabytes out of the many terabytes of information stored in the data-set. Spanning a period of 19 years, the affected HR records include payslips, bank account details, tax file and passport numbers, emergency contacts, and some academic records, on an estimated 200,000 current and former staff and students. Sensitive personal information such as medical and counselling records, academic misconduct and financial hardship is not stored in the same part of the network. Whether the data was taken based off a targeted search of the records, a random sample or some other extraction method is still unclear. But the intruders didn’t stop there. After extracting the HR files via another compromised computer, more phishing emails were sent out to harvest further credentials. Whatever hackers planned to do next, they were interrupted. A new scheduled firewall went up, booting them out of their base of operations in the middle of one of their clean-up cycles. They spent a frantic fortnight in the lead up to Christmas trying to break back in. Eventually, they found another foothold in a legacy computer not behind a firewall. But what about those email traps sent to IT staff? As hackers continued their operation, one or two red-faced IT staffers did click on their malicious emails, handing over more credentials. But others in the department recognised the emails for what they were and shut down the new attack station. Unfortunately, at the time, they didn’t see them as part of a much bigger attack. Unknown to the university, hackers were now waging another a two-month-long battle to get back inside its systems. For the ANU’s chief information security officer Suthagar Seevartnam, all this suggests the information they stole wasn’t the endgame after all. Part of the data harvested was made up of field names, often displayed in confusing jargon unique to the university. It would have been difficult for hackers to search and, indeed, decipher. And the ANU says what was taken doesn’t appear to have been misused. “Our current sense is the actor didn’t get what they wanted because they were stopped twice during their campaign,” Seevartnam says. “And what they did get was not immediately usable or they didn’t understand the data’s business context.” Once disrupted by ANU security upgrades, the hackers didn’t give up, trying new tactics almost up until the point of discovery, including attempts to disable the university’s email spam filter. They also returned to harvest another handful of HR files missed during the first extraction. Even after discovering the breach, the ANU says it was still under attack, working to shore up its defences and secure the network. Within an hour of going public with the news, the university came under fire again, this time in the form of a botnet campaign. And the following night, there was another attempt on the spam filter – leading investigators to suspect the same hackers still hadn’t given up. The university now believes its systems are secure. Whoever they were, they were well-resourced and highly skilled. As Professor Schmidt puts it: “This was a state-of-the-art hack, carried out by an actor at the very top of their game, at the very cutting edge.” Sophisticated is often code for “state sponsored” but at this stage the ANU insists it can’t rule anyone out. While it notes the type of data targeted – HR and financial records – would be of high value to criminals dealing in identity theft online, the information stolen hasn’t been detected online And both the university and police say the small number of suspected identity fraud cases involving ANU staff or students since the breach have all been deemed unrelated. So did hackers keep going because what they extracted wasn’t valuable enough to sell – or were they after something else? Shoebridge thinks it unlikely the type of data taken would have been of much interest to criminals in the first place. “They have better sources for that kind of stuff,” he says. “But universities are great datasets for foreign espionage outfits. This would fit nicely into information China has already gotten elsewhere. “ANU conducts a whole lot of interesting research, it’s student and teaching population over time flow on to become government officials.You need information on people to pressure them into doing what you want. “The level of sophistication and aggression here calls to mind a state actor. It’s pretty impressive ANU found them. I think they would have been happy to stay in the network, undetected.” Attribution is a notoriously difficult on the modern cyber battlefield. As countries throughout the world devote more resources to online spying and sabotage, diplomacy is struggling to keep the peace. The Australian Cyber Security Centre, which is run by the nation’s top spy agencies, did not respond to requests for comment before deadline but has been working closely with the ANU on the investigation. Last year, the centre’s head Alastair MacGibbon said he was aware of foreign countries that “actively try to steal IP from tertiary institutions and research centres” and last year the Australian government took the rare step of publicly rebuking China for stealing commercial secrets from local businesses. But this hack has not been attributed to the communist government so far. Shoebridge thinks attribution is important. “This should serve a lesson for all institutions, especially universities,” he says. “But it shouldn’t be on them to take on foreign governments. Australia needs to attribute attacks like these. If you catch a burglar in your house, pretending it didn’t happen just encourages them to come back the next night.” Having identified technical weak-points in ANU systems as well as “people and process issues”, the university will now look to rebuild its network entirely over the next four years and roll out extra training to staff. The university did not answer questions on funding for the new initiative or IT resources during the hack, but at the time it was discovered staff were in the middle of a significant security upgrade following the previous 2018 attack. “Unfortunately, there was not sufficient time to universally implement all measures across the ANU network between the two attacks in 2018,” the report says. “The sophistication and speed of the second attack underscore the threat environment in which we now operate.” ANU handed down the report as Australia’s top spy agency launched an investigation into another attack on regional Victorian hospitals this week. Seevaratnam says commentary around hacks should focus less on what organisations did wrong – which he calls “victim-blaming” – and more on the lessons that can be learnt to protect the community. “We need to encourage and support other victims coming forward and sharing their stories.”

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Cyber security #experts discuss #mitigating #threats, say #universities can #play a key #role in #protecting the #country against a #cyber attack

Former U.S. Director of National Intelligence and Navy Vice Adm. Mike McConnell advocated today for stronger protection of digital data transfers and for universities to play a key role in filling cyber security jobs.

McConnell was among the keynote speakers at the 2018 SEC Academic Conference hosted by Auburn University. The conference, which is ongoing through Tuesday, is focused on the topic of “Cyber Security: A Shared Responsibility” and brings together representatives from the SEC’s 14 member universities along with industry experts in the area of cyber security.

McConnell is encouraging the use of ubiquitous encryption as a solution for stronger data protection.

“As we go to the cloud…ubiquitous encryption of some sort would be used so that if anybody accessed that data, you can’t read it. If you’re moving [the data] from point A to point B, it scrambles so you can’t read it,” he said.

McConnell understands that stronger data security can come at a cost for others, including law enforcement who may need to access data within a device during a criminal investigation.

“What I’m arguing is the greater need for the country is a higher level of [data] security. If that’s the greater need, then some things of lesser need have to be sacrificed. So when I say ubiquitous encryption, that’s what I’m attempting to describe. It is protecting the data that is the very lifeblood of the country,” McConnell said.

McConnell also addressed how academia can help in securing the nation from cyber attacks.

“We have about 300,000 job openings across the United States for which there are no cyber security-skilled people to fill those jobs,” he said. “Universities are debating academically ‘What is cyber security?’ and ‘How do you credit the degrees?’ and ‘How do you get consensus on what it is and what it should do?’”

He urged universities to move more quickly on coming to a consensus so they can get certified and accredited to start producing students who can fill those jobs.

Glenn Gaffney, executive vice president at In-Q-Tel, also spoke to the role higher education institutions can play in cyber security during his keynote address at the conference.

“It is at the university level where we don’t have to take a top-down approach,” Gaffney said, adding that universities can work together, through research and student involvement, to create proactive solutions to cyber security. “This is where the next generation of leaders will be developed. It’s here that these dialogues must begin. This is the opportunity.”

Ray Rothrock, CEO and chairman of RedSeal Inc., was the day’s third speaker, presenting on the topic of “Infrastructure: IoT, Enterprise, Cyber Physical.” Rothrock also held a signing for his new book, “Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?”

Attendees at the conference are exploring computer and communication technology; the economic and physical systems that are controlled by technology; and the policies and laws that govern and protect information stored, transmitted and processed with technology.

Students at each SEC member university participated in a Cyber Challenge and presented posters displaying their work in the area of cyber security.

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Hack of #Baltimore’s 911 #dispatch system was #ransomware #attack, city #officials say

The hack that forced Baltimore’s 911 dispatch system to be temporarily shut down over the weekend was a ransomware attack, city officials said Wednesday.

Such attacks — another of which occurred in Atlanta last week — take over parts of private or municipal computer networks and then demand payment, or ransom, for their release.

Frank Johnson, chief information officer in the Mayor’s Office of Information Technology, said he was not aware of any specific ransom request made by the hackers of Baltimore’s network, but federal authorities are investigating.

“The systems and the software and the files are all being investigated by the FBI right now,” Johnson said.

No personal data of city residents was compromised, he added.

Dave Fitz, an FBI spokesman, could not be reached Wednesday. On Tuesday, Fitz said the agency was aware of the breach and providing assistance to the city, but otherwise declined to comment.

The attack infiltrated a server that runs the city’s computer-aided dispatch, or CAD, system for 911 and 311 calls. The system automatically populates 911 callers’ locations on maps and dispatches the closest emergency responders there more seamlessly than is possible with manual dispatching. It also relays information to first responders in some cases and logs information for data retention and records.

The breach shut down the CAD system from Sunday morning until Monday morning, forcing the city to revert to manual dispatching during that time. While the city’s 911 calls are normally recorded online on Open Baltimore, the city dispatch logs stopped recording them at 9:54 a.m. Sunday and didn’t resume recording them again until 7:42 a.m. Monday.

Johnson said the attack was made possible after a city information technology team troubleshooting a separate communications issue with the server inadvertently changed a firewall and left a port, or a channel to the Internet, open for about 24 hours, and hackers who were likely running automated scans of networks looking for such vulnerabilities found it and gained access.

“I don’t know what else to call it but a self-inflicted wound,” Johnson said. “The bad guys did not get in on their own without the help of someone inadvertently leaving the door open.”

Once the “limited breach” was identified, city information technology crews “were able to successfully isolate the threat and ensure that no harm was done to other servers or systems” on the city’s network, Johnson said. And once “all systems were properly vetted, CAD was brought back online.”

Johnson said the city “continues to work with its federal partners to determine the source of the intrusion.”

The Baltimore hack comes amid increasing hacking of municipal systems across the country, and follows one in Atlanta last week that paralyzed that city’s online bill-payment system, with hackers demanding a $51,000 payment in bitcoin to unlock it. That attack occurred Thursday, and Atlanta employees only turned their computers back on Tuesday.

Johnson said his office works diligently to prevent cyberattacks and is looking to invest more in safeguarding its networks.

Baltimore also faced cyberattacks during the unrest in 2015, when its website was taken offline. Johnson said he was unaware of any other successful attacks on the city’s networks. He said the city would be obligated to disclose any attacks that compromised residents’ personal information, health information or crime data.

Johnson said he feels the city recovered well from the breach once it was identified, but that he did not want to go into detail about what was done lest he expose the city to more attacks.

The city has a $2.5 million contract with TriTech Software Systems to maintain its CAD software and provide “technical support services to ensure the functional integrity” of the city’s CAD system.

Scott MacDonald, TriTech’s vice president of public safety strategy, said the company worked with city IT personnel to shut down the CAD software after the attack. The breach was not related to the company’s software, MacDonald said.

“When we were alerted of it, it was reported that the server had some sort of compromise,” he said. “Our techs connected and worked with the IT staff there, and the CAD system was taken down manually, in combination between our staff and theirs, while the servers could be troubleshooted by the city.”

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12 #Connecticut #state agencies #hit by a #cyber attack

The Department of Administrative Services (DAS) announced that the State of Connecticut suffered a ransomware attack on Friday, February 23. Although most computers were protected with adequate antivirus software, approximately 160 machines in 12 agencies were not.

DAS spokesperson Jeffrey Beckham said that, through a collaboration with agency IT and other partners, the virus was contained by the evening of Sunday, February 25. There were no reports of encrypted files or data loss, and the DAS does not believe state business will be affected by the breach.

NRA targeted by DDoS cyber criminals
Three US National Rifle Association (NRA) websites were the latest victims of memcached-based distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, as reported by Qihoo 360’s Network Security Research Lab (Netlab). nra.org, nracarryguard.com, and nrafoundation.org join other large-platform targets, including Amazon and Google. This also follows the biggest DDoS attack to date, which targeted GitHub in February 2018.

As early as February 25, Twitter users were posting about the NRA DDoS takedown. It’s likely that these attacks are politically motivated, as the pro-gun organization has been criticised following the Parkland school shooting on February 14, in which 17 people were killed. It is not uncommon for criminal hackers to launch DDoS attacks on controversial organizations and figures – past victims include the Ku Klux Klan, ISIS, and Donald Trump.

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New York is #quietly working to #prevent a major #cyber attack that could bring down the #financial #system

Source: National Cyber Security News

Five months before the 9/11 attacks, US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld sent a memo to one of his advisers with an ominous message.

“Cyberwar,” read the subject line.

“Please take a look at this article,” Rumsfeld wrote, “and tell me what you think I ought to do about it. Thanks.”

Attached was a 38-page paper, published seven months prior, analyzing the consequences of society’s increasing dependence on the internet.

It was April 30, 2001. Optimistic investors and frenzied tech entrepreneurs were still on a high from the dot-com boom. The World Wide Web was spreading fast.

Once America’s enemies got around to fully embracing the internet, the report predicted, it would be weaponized and turned against the homeland.

The internet would be to modern warfare what the airplane was to strategic bombers during World War I.

The paper’s three authors — two PhD graduates and the founder of a cyber defense research center — imagined the damage a hostile foreign power could inflict on the US. They warned of enemies infecting computers with malicious code, and launching mass denial of service attacks that could bring down networks critical to the functioning of the American economy.

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2,000 #computers were #shut down due to #SamSam virus #attack to #Colorado Department of #Transportation

Source: National Cyber Security News

On Wednesday morning the workday in Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) was disturbed. The institution went back to good old days when computers were not existing due to SamSam ransomware virus attack.

On February 22, the file-encrypting virus hit CDOT’s computers, encrypted files and demanded to pay the ransom in Bitcoins. More than 2,000 computers were shut down to stop and investigate the attack.

According to the CDOT spokeswoman, the version of SamSam ransomware hit only Windows OS computers even though they were secured by McAfee antivirus. However, CDOT and security software providers are working on virus elimination.

Fortunately, Colorado Department of Transportation has all data backed up. Therefore, they are not going to pay the ransom and crooks attempts to blackmail the institution did not succeed.

Meanwhile, employees are forbidden from accessing the Internet until the problem is solved. Ransomware did not affect any critical services, such as cameras, alerts on traffics or variable message boards.

Authors of SamSam ransomware already received money from victims in 2018
SamSam ransomware is known for a while. Numerous versions of malware hit hospitals and other institutions last year. Colorado Department of Transportation is not the first organization that was in the target eye of the ransomware creators this year too.

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Wall #Street Teams Up to Help Save #Client Data in #Cyber Attack

On Wall Street, backing up data now comes with a code name.

Nearly three dozen banks are leading a group called Sheltered Harbor that’s designed to protect consumers’ access to their data in the event a financial institution is hacked. Banks, credit unions and brokerages representing 400 million accounts — or 70 percent of U.S. retail accounts and 60 percent of U.S. brokerage accounts — have signed up to be part of the effort, which went live earlier this year.

Sheltered Harbor requires members to encrypt their customer account data and store it in a vault that is both survivable and accessible in case of a cybersecurity incident, according to the group’s website. If a breach does occur, the affected bank must retrieve and transmit its data to another financial institution, which can load it onto its core platform. That way customers of the hacked bank can still access their account information.

“The focus is on really trying to protect the consumers’ access to their assets,” Steve Silberstein, chief executive officer of Sheltered Harbor, said in a telephone interview. “We have to continue to make the system safer, and it continues to require some amount of sharing and some amount of cooperation to do that.”

For large global banks, it costs $50,000 to participate in Sheltered Harbor, which helps the firms coordinate responses to a cyber attack. For everyone else, fees are based on the amount of assets each one has and can range from $250 to $25,000, according to the group’s website.

The group was formed in November 2016 and its recent progress was reported Sunday by The Wall Street Journal.

Hamilton Series

Sheltered Harbor is a subsidiary of the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center — or FS-ISAC. Phil Venables, chief operational risk officer at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., and James Rosenthal, former chief operating officer at Morgan Stanley, are co-chairs of the project, according to a press release from FS-ISAC.

The group was formed after banks participated in an exercise in 2015 that was run by FS-ISAC and the U.S. Treasury Department called the Hamilton Series. The exercise exposed how data breaches could hurt consumer confidence in the financial system, even if the incident occurred at a regional or community bank.

Sheltered Harbor does not hold any of the bank account data. Instead, it has created the standards for joining the group and monitors banks’ adherence to those standards, said Silberstein, who was previously the chief technology officer at Sungard Data Systems Inc.

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​Australia #fair game when it comes to the #threat of a #cyber attack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

For a country with a culture based on taking things as they come, Check Point has said Australia is taking the threat of cybersecurity seriously.

Previously, organisations in Australia were protected by the country’s geographic isolation, but as business is now being carried out at scale via the internet, Tony Jarvis, chief strategist of threat prevention at security vendor Check Point, has said everyone is “fair game” when it comes to the threat of a breach.

Speaking with ZDNet, Jarvis said organisations in Australia used to have the luxury of foresight, watching peers from bigger parts of the world deal with security-related incidents six months before the trend entered Australia, providing them with ample time to prepare.

However, that is no longer the case, as highlighted by the WannaCry ransomware that claimed hundreds of thousands of victims across 150 countries, reaching speed and red-light cameras on state roads in Victoria, and Petya, which even halted chocolate production at Cadbury’s Tasmanian factory.

“When you’re doing business on the internet, which everybody is, everybody is fair game at exactly the same point in time, so we have to be cognizant of that,” Jarvis said.

“Australia is good at taking that seriously, they do appreciate that risk, and translating that into taking the necessary actions and preventative measures is definitely on the agenda.

“Australia is making good progress.”

He said it is important to remember there’s no such thing as cybersecurity in the sense that nothing can be 100 percent secure.

“Rather, cyber resilience, and being prepared as you can be while also acknowledging the fact that something might slip through the cracks, and having a plan in place to deal with that should it happen,” he explained.

“Australia is definitely taking the right steps, everybody faces slightly different risks, but more or less they’re all on the same sort of path.”

Australians have a reputation of being heavy consumers of technology, and with the estimation that there will be 20.4 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices deployed by 2020, Jarvis said securing these devices should be a priority, given that IoT presents a future that is very difficult to secure.

He said it’s important for everyone involved, including designers, manufacturers, retailers, and consumers, to be aware of the security risks.

“There’s always a lot of hype in the security industry, unfortunately, and a good part of our time is spent on deciphering what is hype and what is fact,” Jarvis explained.

“Unfortunately, when we start talking about IoT, a lot of the hype is real.

“We live in a capitalist society; we have manufacturers and companies whose job is to put products on the shelf that we want to go out and buy and they improve our life somehow, such as fitbits and other fitness trackers,

“Unfortunately, security lags quite a number of years behind bringing these products to market.”

While there are a number of best practice guidelines published by the likes of IoT Alliance Australia and the Cloud Security Alliance, there’s no unanimous decision on which standard to adopt, nor is there an overarching body to make sure every part of the process adheres to agreed guidelines.

“Not all manufacturers will adhere to those standards, but even if they do, if there’s a vulnerability that’s found on a specific device, how do you actually go and remediate or patch that, because it’s not always possible,” Jarvis added.

“A lot of the hype in this case is justified.

“We don’t need to be worried, but we do need to be cognizant.”

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Hackers #hired for #year-long #DDoS attack #against #man’s former #employer

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans US federal prosecutors in Minnesota have charged a 46-year-old man with hiring a cyberhitman – well, technically, three hacking services – to launch a year-long campaign of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on his former employer. Prosecutors say that John Kelsey Gammell, 46, contacted seven […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?