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Cybersecurity a #critical area for #closer #cooperation between #Asean and #Australia

Asean and Australia should work closer together on cybersecurity issues, which range from Internet crimes to fake news, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said on Sunday (March 18).

In a speech to other Asean leaders and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during a plenary session at the Asean-Australia Special Summit, he noted that cybercrimes are a transboundary problem that is difficult to police.

“It can have a drastic impact on our populations, for example in terms of critical infrastructure; and it can be insidious – undermining the trust which holds our societies together, for example through fake news.”

The world is getting more vulnerable to cybersecurity threats, not less, he added, and so it is essential for governments to develop new rules and norms to cope with the challenge.

There is also potential for this region to play a role in the international discourse on cyber-security, Mr Lee said, noting that a proposed Asean-Australia Cyber Policy Dialogue can be a platform for greater policy exchange and capacity-building.

Another promising area for strategic cooperation is in developing smart cities, he said.

A new Asean-Australia Smart Cities Initiative, announced by Mr Turnbull on Saturday, complements the Asean Smart Cities Network initiative and Asean’s Masterplan on Asean Connectivity 2025, he added.

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​Australia #fair game when it comes to the #threat of a #cyber attack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

For a country with a culture based on taking things as they come, Check Point has said Australia is taking the threat of cybersecurity seriously.

Previously, organisations in Australia were protected by the country’s geographic isolation, but as business is now being carried out at scale via the internet, Tony Jarvis, chief strategist of threat prevention at security vendor Check Point, has said everyone is “fair game” when it comes to the threat of a breach.

Speaking with ZDNet, Jarvis said organisations in Australia used to have the luxury of foresight, watching peers from bigger parts of the world deal with security-related incidents six months before the trend entered Australia, providing them with ample time to prepare.

However, that is no longer the case, as highlighted by the WannaCry ransomware that claimed hundreds of thousands of victims across 150 countries, reaching speed and red-light cameras on state roads in Victoria, and Petya, which even halted chocolate production at Cadbury’s Tasmanian factory.

“When you’re doing business on the internet, which everybody is, everybody is fair game at exactly the same point in time, so we have to be cognizant of that,” Jarvis said.

“Australia is good at taking that seriously, they do appreciate that risk, and translating that into taking the necessary actions and preventative measures is definitely on the agenda.

“Australia is making good progress.”

He said it is important to remember there’s no such thing as cybersecurity in the sense that nothing can be 100 percent secure.

“Rather, cyber resilience, and being prepared as you can be while also acknowledging the fact that something might slip through the cracks, and having a plan in place to deal with that should it happen,” he explained.

“Australia is definitely taking the right steps, everybody faces slightly different risks, but more or less they’re all on the same sort of path.”

Australians have a reputation of being heavy consumers of technology, and with the estimation that there will be 20.4 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices deployed by 2020, Jarvis said securing these devices should be a priority, given that IoT presents a future that is very difficult to secure.

He said it’s important for everyone involved, including designers, manufacturers, retailers, and consumers, to be aware of the security risks.

“There’s always a lot of hype in the security industry, unfortunately, and a good part of our time is spent on deciphering what is hype and what is fact,” Jarvis explained.

“Unfortunately, when we start talking about IoT, a lot of the hype is real.

“We live in a capitalist society; we have manufacturers and companies whose job is to put products on the shelf that we want to go out and buy and they improve our life somehow, such as fitbits and other fitness trackers,

“Unfortunately, security lags quite a number of years behind bringing these products to market.”

While there are a number of best practice guidelines published by the likes of IoT Alliance Australia and the Cloud Security Alliance, there’s no unanimous decision on which standard to adopt, nor is there an overarching body to make sure every part of the process adheres to agreed guidelines.

“Not all manufacturers will adhere to those standards, but even if they do, if there’s a vulnerability that’s found on a specific device, how do you actually go and remediate or patch that, because it’s not always possible,” Jarvis added.

“A lot of the hype in this case is justified.

“We don’t need to be worried, but we do need to be cognizant.”

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Australia: Shelve Proposed Law to Weaken Encryption

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The Australian government should not force technology companies to weaken the security of their products or to subvert encryption, Human Rights Watch said last week in a letter to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. That strategy would undermine cybersecurity for all users and would not stop determined criminals from using encryption….

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Huawei Australia appoints former NBN security head as cybersecurity officer

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Huawei Australia appoints former NBN security head as cybersecurity officer

Former head of security for NBN and Telecom New Zealand Malcolm Shore, who has also worked in NZ Defence security, has been appointed Huawei Australia’s cybersecurity officer. Huawei Australia has announced appointing former Australian National Broadband Network (NBN) and Telecom New Zealand head of security Dr Malcolm Shore as its…

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Singapore and Australia agree to boost cybersecurity cooperation

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Singapore and Australia agree to boost cybersecurity cooperation

Australia and Singapore have agreed to strengthen cybersecurity cooperation, with a two-year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed on Friday (Jun 2). Key areas of collaboration include having a regular exchange of information on cybersecurity incidents and threats, sharing best practices to promote innovation in cybersecurity, training in cybersecurity skillsets, and…

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Online dating apps including Tinder and Grindr linked to the rapidly increasing cases of STIs in Australia

STI levels are rising rapidly across Australia, and health experts are pointing the blame at dating apps like Tinder and Grindr. Chlamydia is currently the most widespread sexually transmitted infection, with 80,000 cases diagnosed a year in Australia – but gonorrhoea levels has doubled and even tripled in some regions. ‘For some people the fun is increased by taking sexual risks with people they meet on dating apps,’ Associate Professor David Whiley at the University of Queensland’s Centre for Clinical Research, told 9 News. Read More….

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1 in 14 Catholic priests accused of child abuse in Australia

SYDNEY Australia — Seven percent of Catholic priests were accused of abusing children in Australia between 1950 and 2010 but the allegations were never investigated, “shocking and indefensible” data showed Monday during an inquiry into pedophilia in the church.

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse heard that 4,444 alleged incidents of pedophilia were reported to church authorities and in some dioceses, more than 15 percent of priests were perpetrators.

Australia ordered the Royal Commission in 2012 after a decade of growing pressure to investigate allegations of child abuse across the country, with the inquiry now in its final phase after four years of hearings.

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Australia admits government hack attacks, boosts cyber security

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Sydney (AFP) – Australia unveiled a multi-million-dollar cyber scheme to combat hacking on Thursday, as Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull acknowledged an attack on the country’s weather bureau but stopped short of blaming it on China.

The Australian leader added that it was safe to assume “efforts are made by foreign actors, both governmental and non-governmental, to penetrate” local agencies.

“I can confirm reports that the Bureau of Meteorology suffered a significant cyber intrusion which was first discovered early last year, and the department of parliamentary services suffered a similar intrusion in recent years,” Turnbull said in Sydney as he announced Aus$230 million (US$180 million) in new government funding.

“I don’t have anything further to add than what I’ve said today,” he replied when asked at a press conference if the weather bureau attack came from China.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation in December cited an unnamed official blaming Beijing for the major cyber attack, where hackers got inside computer systems at the bureau, which owns one of the nation’s largest supercomputers and has links to the defence department.

Turnbull said the new funding, which comes on top of an allocation of Aus$400 million over the next decade to strengthen cyber security, would include support for regular meetings between government, businesses and researchers on tackling emerging concerns.

The additional money would also help to boost international efforts, particularly in the Indo-Pacific region, to take down cyber criminals.

“The Australian Crime Commission estimates the annual cost of cyber crime to Australia is over Aus$1 billion in direct costs,” the prime minister added.

“But some estimates put the real costs to be as high as one percent of GDP (gross domestic product) a year, or about Aus$17 billion.”

Turnbull said the government was focusing not just on defensive measures but also offence, stressing that the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) — like allies the United States and Britain — had “very considerable capabilities”, without elaborating.

Regional superpower China, Australia’s largest trading partner, has been accused of organised hacking against the US government and private firms, as well as other countries.

In 2013, Chinese hackers were accused of stealing the top-secret blueprints of Australia’s new intelligence agency headquarters.

Two years earlier the computers of the prime minister, foreign minister and defence minister were all suspected of being hacked in attacks reportedly originating in China.
Source:https://www.yahoo.com/tech/australia-admits-government-hack-attacks-boosts-cyber-security-052531597.html

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eHarmony Is Looking For A New Marketing Director For Australia

ADNEWS.COM.AU – Apr 19 – The marketing director will lead all marketing efforts in Australia across offline, online acquisition, brand, creative and CRM. Read More….

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Resellers in Australia strive to spin up security skills

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

IT providers face a challenge to set up their own hacker outfits. It may have required the public evisceration of Target and Sony Pictures, but it is finally possible to talk about information security in an Australian pub. It might seem odd that a global industry worth just shy of US$100 billion globally wasn’t already a point of discussion, but cyber security is not your average industry. It is a complex, shadowy sister of consumer tech, better known for its criminals than its champions. It’s not only reached the pub – it’s also a big topic for the boardroom. Security is a true priority for management. Many CEOs are now approaching their tech providers to ask, “What are we doing about hackers?” This may help to explain why data from Gartner in November pegged industry spend to be worth US$91 billion by year’s end and US$116 billion by 2019. Gartner predicts spend in the security services industry, including consulting, hardware support, implementation and outsourcing, will trip US$55 billion in 2016 and US$73 billion by 2019. With so much money at stake, it is no surprise resellers have read the tea leaves and are making forays into the cyber security sector. […]

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