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Backlash When the Boss Discovers You’re in the Clearance Process with Another Employer? – Ask CJ | #employeefraud | #recruitment | #corporatesecurity | #businesssecurity | #

Dealing with employee performance issues is difficult as a supervisor. But what if you’re an employee experiencing backlash because your employer found out you are seeking out other offers? Recently, […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#hacking | Russian Cybercrime Boss Burkov Pleads Guilty — Krebs on Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Aleksei Burkov, an ultra-connected Russian hacker once described as “an asset of supreme importance” to Moscow, has pleaded guilty in a U.S. court to running a site that sold stolen payment card data and to administering a highly secretive crime forum that counted among its members […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#computersecurity | 187 million emails sent every 60 seconds SeniorNet boss tells Timaru

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

About 15 members of SeniorNet South Canterbury attended a presentation on the digital future delivered by SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway.

Bejon Haswell/ Stuff

About 15 members of SeniorNet South Canterbury attended a presentation on the digital future delivered by SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway.

Technology is wasted on youth, SeniorNet Federation’s executive officer told Timaru members at a digital future presentation.

Grant Sidaway delivered a presentation to 15 members at Ara Institute last week and a collective gasp rung out as he showed a mind boggling pie graph of what occurred online over 60 seconds, on average, around the world.

This information showed 187 million emails were sent, $862,823 spent, 3.7 million google searches and 18 million texts sent in an average minute.

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway holds a piece of fibre optic cable which is used to connect New Zealand to the world digitally.

Bejon Haswell/ Stuff

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway holds a piece of fibre optic cable which is used to connect New Zealand to the world digitally.

While the information opened SeniorNet tutor Bill Small’s eyes to how fast technology was moving, for Graeme Holwell, who is in his 80s, there was too much change and he found it hard to adjust.

He used a computer for communication with friends and family only.

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway shared his knowledge of technology with Timaru SeniorNet members at Ara Institute on Thursday.

Bejon Haswell/ Stuff

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway shared his knowledge of technology with Timaru SeniorNet members at Ara Institute on Thursday.

“I’m not saying it’s (technology) not an advantage but gee,” he told Stuff.

Sidaway said technology became more useful as people got older and it saved money.  A smart speaker at a cost of between $60-$100 used with wifi, saved a user having to get into a computer, as it was voice activated.

“How useful is that if you have arthritis? . . It is an example of how technology has shifted.”

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway talks to Timaru members about the digital future on Thursday.

Bejon Haswell/ Stuff

SeniorNet Federation executive officer Grant Sidaway talks to Timaru members about the digital future on Thursday.

The device, with a hub, could be used to automate a home, making curtains shut or heaters turn on at the sound of a voice.

He said 30 years ago people had to be “geeks” to understand a computer whereas now they were much simpler and available to anyone.

SeniorNet has between 12,000 and 15,000 members throughout the country. The Timaru branch based in the Confucius Institute Resource Centre at Ara Institute runs workshops on different aspects of technology and online safety.

The fears many older people had of being online Sidaway allayed because for the majority of people who followed proper protocols it was a really safe environment.

SeniorNet worked alongside Cyber Security New Zealand and taught members about password protection and how to spot a scam.   

Building confidence and skills in older users, so they could teach each other were some of the aims of SeniorNet. Young people often were not patient teaching parents or grandparents, Sidaway said.

 “OIder people are afraid they’ll make a fool of themselves in the eye of young people.”

He told the group that technology reduces social isolation and offered independence to those not so mobile, through networking, online shopping and banking. It was estimated that an average user in a big city could save $1000 a year by not having to drive and pay to park to carry out their errands.

SeniorNet South Canterbury chair Dick Dodds said he found the presentation interesting especially about what technology was available.

Cyber Smart Week, from October 14-18, aims to raise awareness of cyber security and help people understand how to keep safe online.

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#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
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#computersecurity | Blocking research with China would ‘hurt’, Microsoft boss says

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionWATCH: Satya Nadella on Microsoft’s work in China

Microsoft does more research and development in China than it does anywhere else outside the United States. But, as US-China relations continue to sour on issues of trade and cyber-security, the decades-long ties Microsoft has in China are coming under close scrutiny.

In an interview with BBC News, Microsoft’s chief executive Satya Nadella has said that despite national security concerns, backing out of China would “hurt more” than it solved.

“A lot of AI research happens in the open, and the world benefits from knowledge being open,” he said.

“That to me is been what’s been true since the Renaissance and the scientific revolution. Therefore, I think, for us to say that we will put barriers on it may in fact hurt more than improve the situation everywhere.”

Microsoft’s first office in China was opened by founder and then-chief executive Bill Gates in 1992. Its main location in Beijing now employs more than 200 scientists and involves over 300 visiting scholars and students. It is currently recruiting for, among other roles, researchers in machine learning.

In April, it was reported by the Financial Times that Microsoft researchers were collaborating with teams at China’s National University of Defence Technology, working on artificial intelligence projects that some outside observers warned could be used for oppressive means.

Speaking to the newspaper, Republican Senator Ted Cruz said: “American companies need to understand that doing business in China carries significant and deepening risk.”

He added: “In addition to being targeted by the Chinese Communist party for espionage, American companies are increasingly at risk of boosting the Chinese Communist party’s human rights atrocities.”

Technology as weapon

Mr Nadella acknowledged that risk.

“We know any technology can be a tool or a weapon,” he told the BBC.

“The question is, how do you ensure that these weapons don’t get created? I think there are multiple mechanisms. The first thing is we, as creators, should start with having a set of ethical design principles to ensure that we’re creating AI that’s fair, that’s secure, that’s private, that’s not biased.”

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionMicrosoft’s CEO Satya Nadella spoke to the BBC in 2017: Judge us on value we add, not tax we pay

He said he felt his company had sufficient control over how the controversial emerging technologies are used, and said the firm had turned down requests in China – and elsewhere – to engage in projects it felt were inappropriate, due to either technical infeasibility or ethical concerns.

“We do have control on who gets to use our technology. And we do have principles. Beyond how we build it, how people use it is something that we control through Terms of Use. And we are constantly evolving the terms of use.

“We also recognise whether it’s in the United States, whether it’s in China, whether it’s in the United Kingdom, they will all have their own legislative processes on what they accept or don’t accept, and we will abide by them.”

‘Leaves me wondering…’

Matt Sheehan, from the Paulson Institute, studies the relationship between California’s technology scene and the Chinese economy. He said Microsoft’s efforts, particularly its Beijing office, have had tremendous impact.

“It dramatically advanced the field, advances that have helped the best American and European AI research labs push further,” he said.

“But those same advances feed into the field of computer vision, a key enabler of China’s surveillance apparatus.”

He cites one particular paper as highlighting the complexity of working with, and within, China. Deep Residual Learning for Image Recognition, published in 2016, was a research paper produced by four Chinese researchers working at Microsoft.

According to Google Scholar, which indexes research papers, their paper was cited more than 25,256 times between 2014-2018 – more than any other paper in any other field of research.

“The lead author now works for a US tech company in California,” said Mr Sheehan, referring to Facebook.

“Two other authors work for a company involved in Chinese surveillance. And the last author is trying to build autonomous vehicles in China.

“What do we make of all that? Honestly, it leaves me – and I think it should leave others – scratching their heads and wondering.”

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Follow Dave Lee on Twitter @DaveLeeBBC

Do you have more information about this or any other technology story? You can reach Dave directly and securely through encrypted messaging app Signal on: +1 (628) 400-7370

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Swedish Security Co. Boss Declared ‘Bankrupt’ After Identity Stolen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The man running Sweden’s biggest security firm was declared bankrupt this week after his identity was hacked. Though the suboptimal branding implications were hard to miss, Securitas AB was able to put the whole awkward incident behind it by the end of the day. Alf Goransson, the company’s 59-year-old chief…

The post Swedish Security Co. Boss Declared ‘Bankrupt’ After Identity Stolen appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Cyber attacks a constant threat, says GCSB boss

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

An average of seven serious cyber attacks a month are being detected by the so-called “cortex” programme operated by Government Communications Security Bureau – the spy agency. New GCSB boss Andrew Hampton said the attacks were carried out by foreign agents and targeted “nationally significant” organisations. That was just a typical month. The nature of […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

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Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals

Cyber-criminals are hacking into corporate computer systems and using the public profiles of top executives to fine-tune email scams that are duping Canadians out of hundreds of millions of dollars each year, a CBC News investigation has discovered. “It came on the scene in a massive way, from virtually nothing to $19 million in 2014” in losses reported, said Daniel Williams of the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, a federal government agency. He also says that research by the CAFC and police suggests that less than three per cent of these email scams ever gets reported, meaning the incidents and the losses are probably much higher. “Most probably in the range of $500 million to $1 billion,” Williams says. “It’s big, big money. It’s very organized, very sophisticated crime groups with a lot of resources putting a lot of effort … really on an industrial scale.” Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/ransomware-cyber-scams-bogus-emails-1.3314221

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The post Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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KakaoTalk chat app boss quits after child porn row

The co-founder of South Korea’s most popular chat app has resigned after being accused of failing to prevent child abuse imagery being spread via the service.

Kakao Corp announced Lee Seok-Woo’s departure a week after he was charged, but not detained, by prosecutors.

Mr Lee had been in charge of the KakaoTalk app until August, when he moved to an advisory role.

The company says that its chat app has more than 100 million users.

“Lee said he would like to take on new challenges,” Kakao Corp said in a statementprovided to the Korea Herald newspaper, adding that he was scheduled to formally step down on Saturday.

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The post KakaoTalk chat app boss quits after child porn row appeared first on Parent Security Online.

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Australian dad posed as crime boss to find his late son’s illegal drug suppliers

An Australian father whose only son died while under the influence of a synthetic recreational drug has infiltrated the Chinese criminal gangs exporting the substances to our shores.

Rod Bridge’s son Preston died in February 2013, after leaping from a Perth balcony while on the synthetic drug, 25i-NBOMe.

It is believed the 16-year-old was under the impression he could fly before he plunged to his death.

“The hallucination for some reason caused him to think he could fly or jump.

“Witnesses have come forward and said he didn’t just fall off a balcony, he ran.”

One hit of 25i-NBOMe is the size of six grains of salt and is up to 60 times more potent than LSD.

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Ex-Bega Cheese boss jailed for child abuse

The former CEO of Bega Cheese Maurice Van Ryn has been sentenced to at least seven years in jail for the sexual abuse of nine children.

Members of the victims’ families shook their heads as Judge Clive Jeffreys found the 59-year-old had shown deep contrition over his decade-long abuse of children.

Van Ryn was sentenced on Wednesday to a maximum of 13 years after pleading guilty to 14 offences over the abuse of nine boys and girls aged eight to 15.

Sydney’s District Court heard how the one-time CEO of the successful cheese company regularly abused his victims while they were swimming at his home’s spa or swimming pool.

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