Boulevard

now browsing by tag

 
 

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Cloud Security that Performs – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

We heard from another customer today that their incumbent cloud security vendor keeps going down. And when it is not down, DLP scans take hours, if they complete at all.   What is going on?

https://securityboulevard.com/

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Bitglass Blog authored by Nat Kausik. Read the original post at: https://www.bitglass.com/blog/cloud-security-performance-1

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Cloud Security that Performs – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Huawei: The Backdoor Papers – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

via Jon Brodkinwriting at Ars Technica – and detailing the latest salvo (chatted up in a Wall Street journal piece) in the United States Government versus Huawei Tug of Networks. We’are calling it The Backdoor Papers. Stay Tuned.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Infosecurity.US authored by Marc Handelman. Read the original post at: https://www.infosecurity.us/blog/2020/2/14/huawei-the-backdoor-papers

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Huawei: The Backdoor Papers – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | WMI 101 for Pentesters – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

PowerShell has gained popularity with SysAdmins and for good reason. It’s on every Windows machine (and now some Linux machines as well), has capabilities to interact with almost every service on every machine on the network, and it’s a command line utility. For the same exact reasons, PowerShell has also become a favorite method of attackers interacting with a victim machine. Because of this, organizations have gotten wise to this attack vector and have put measures in place to mitigate it’s use. But there’s another way! Many don’t know of another built-in Windows utility that actually pre-dates PowerShell and can also help them in their hacking pentesting engagements. That tool is Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). This tutorial will be a small introduction to not only understand the usage of WMI to enumerate information from local and remote machines, but we’ll also show you how to start and kill processes! So let’s jump into WMI 101 for pentesters.

Background on WMI

I will keep this article at an introductory level to understand how to enumerate information in a high level. But as most tutorials, let’s define some terms and provide some historical background. This may get dry but stick with me.

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is Microsoft’s implementation of Web-based Business Management Standards (WBEM), the common information model (CIM) and the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF). Microsoft has officially stated:

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is the infrastructure for management data and operations on Windows-based operating systems.

So what does that mean? Simply, WMI stores a bunch of information about the local machine and allows you to access tat data as well as manage Windows computers locally and remotely.

WMI came pre-installed in Windows 2000. It was made available as a download for Windows NT and Windows 95/98. For historical (Read more…)

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> WMI 101 for Pentesters – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#deepweb | Milestone Boulevard Is Closed At Nine Mile. Here’s A Look At The Work. : NorthEscambia.com

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Milestone Boulevard is closed at Nine Mile Road for drainage work that is part of the Nine Mile widening project. Crews have demolished a section of the roadway. After digging a trench that is about 4-feet deep, 30-inch pipes will be put in place. The roadway […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Google Cloud Identity Pricing – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Google Cloud Identity is free to some extent, but if interested in the broader features of Google Cloud Identity, it can be quite expensive over time. The post Google Cloud Identity Pricing appeared first on JumpCloud. *** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | The Training Evaluation Conundrum – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Stakeholders expect to see a return on their investment in training. In some cases though, they struggle to conceptualize the best way to evaluate the effectiveness of their security awareness training. They are in good company. Training evaluations can be complex, expensive, elusive, and baffles even seasoned pros.

Many busy program leaders instinctively reach for the knowledge check at the end of training. A standardized, graded test is an easy way to measure learning and compare performance, right? Maybe so, but at PhishLabs, we argue against only relying on knowledge checks for a couple of key reasons.

First, knowledge checks can collide with key learning principles. As adults, we are goal-driven and focused on practicality and relevance. These knowledge checks can feel rote and tedious. With all of the competition for your employees’ time, we can’t afford to waste it by inviting them to phone it in during training.

Without delving too deeply into learning theory, here’s the takeaway: measuring knowledge with a test immediately after training is one of the least impactful forms of training evaluation. This is because it only measures how much information the learner has absorbed and can recall immediately. So, let me ask the following: Are you worried about immediate or lasting results? Are you concerned with knowledge or behavior?

The purpose of phishing training or any other security training, is to change behavior. We want to see employees practicing good security behaviors more frequently. It stands to reason then that a more meaningful way to measure the effectiveness of these trainings is with behavioral data over time rather than a knowledge check immediately after a module is complete.

Consider ways to measure the effectiveness of your other security training programs. Are there metrics around data security, password vigilance, or other key behaviors that you can gather to measure the effectiveness of your training programs?

In the context of phishing training, we recommend focusing on phishing simulation results. Has the click rate decreased? Has the report rate increased? The results of your regular phishing simulations offer the best insight into program effectiveness.

https://securityboulevard.com/

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from The PhishLabs Blog authored by Kimber Bougan. Read the original post at: https://info.phishlabs.com/blog/training-evaluation-conundrum

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> The Training Evaluation Conundrum – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Sync AD with macOS – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

By Zach DeMeyer Posted December 25, 2019

Managing user access to Mac® laptops and desktops has historically been a challenge, particularly when using Microsoft® Active Directory® (AD) for identity and access management (IAM). The problem has been a constant issue for IT admins. Thankfully, from the cloud comes a new way to sync AD with macOS® systems.

The Active Directory Stronghold

Most organizations have centralized their IAM program around Microsoft Active Directory. Of course, AD was created in the era of on-prem, Windows®-based networks, so adapting it to modern environments has been a difficult process that is rife with growing pains.

In general, many modern IT networks are heterogeneous with regard to systems, given the rise of macOS and Linux usage in the enterprise. Beyond that, recent explosions of cloud-based applications and infrastructure have put AD-centric organizations in a tough spot.

Historically, IT admins have leveraged on-prem directory extensions or identity bridges to sync AD with macOS systems. In recent days, mobile device management (MDM) tools have joined the mix to manage systems, tablets, and smartphones. These solutions were generally effective, but came with some drawbacks. For some, directory extensions presented a lot of work in terms of installing, implementing, and integrating them. The other challenge with these solutions is that they are generally expensive and ultimately further entrench an organization on-prem. In our increasingly cloud-forward era, this might not be the best strategy for IT admins looking to scale with efficiency.

Syncing AD with macOS from the Cloud

Now, IT admins are at a crossroads. It seems like IT admins have to choose between the lesser of two evils. One route is to continue using their directory extensions and deal with the overhead and budget involved with maintaining them. The other is to find an alternative to Active Directory and replace it altogether, which might involve tedious and potentially painful migration efforts. 

The good news is that there is a third option: a cloud identity management solution that can extend Active Directory not only to Macs but also to Linux servers at (Read more…)

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Sync AD with macOS – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Reforming CDA 230 – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

There’s a serous debate on reforming Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. I am in the process of figuring out what I believe, and this is more a place to put resources and listen to people’s comments.

The EFF has written extensively on why it is so important and dismantling it will ben catastrophic for the Internet. Danielle Citron disagrees. (There’s also this law journal article by Citron and Ben Wittes.) Sarah Jeong’s op-ed. Another op-ed. Another paper.

Here are good news articles.

Reading all of this, I am reminded of this decade-old quote by Dan Geer. He’s addressing Internet service providers:

Hello, Uncle Sam here.

You can charge whatever you like based on the contents of what you are carrying, but you are responsible for that content if it is illegal; inspecting brings with it a responsibility for what you learn.

-or-

You can enjoy common carrier protections at all times, but you can neither inspect nor act on the contents of what you are carrying and can only charge for carriage itself. Bits are bits.

Choose wisely. No refunds or exchanges at this window.

We can revise this choice for the social-media age:

Hi Facebook/Twitter/YouTube/everyone else:

You can build a communications based on inspecting user content and presenting it as you want, but that business model also conveys responsibility for that content.

-or-

You can be a communications service and enjoy the protections of CDA 230, in which case you cannot inspect or control the content you deliver.

Facebook would be an example of the former. WhatsApp would be an example of the latter.

I am honestly undecided about all of this. I want CDA230 to protect things like the commenting section of this blog. But I don’t think it should protect dating apps when they are used as a conduit for abuse. And I really don’t want society to pay the cost for all the externalities inherent in Facebook’s business model.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Schneier on Security authored by Bruce Schneier. Read the original post at: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2019/12/reforming_cda_2.html

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Reforming CDA 230 – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | On-Demand LDAP Server – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans By Ryan Squires Posted December 1, 2019 Setting up LDAP servers is a time-consuming process. There are many aspects of your infrastructure to integrate it with, including systems, applications, and in some cases even networking gear. Of course, making sure your LDAP server is highly available […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Book Review: Virus Bomb – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Imagine this:

“Jerry Barkley is a Minnesota IT contractor just trying to earn a living for his family. He’s no superhero. He never worked for the government. He knows nothing about international espionage. Nobody believes his warnings when he uncovers a plot to launch the largest cyberattack in history. Somebody is gathering data to plan a series of bombings and a biological attack while trying to pin blame on a terrorist group. Oh, and the FBI thinks Jerry is part of it.

Hundreds are already dead. Thousands more could die, first from Ebola and then potentially from a war with the wrong enemy. If he doesn’t act, who will? Up against willful ignorance, a hostile law-enforcement bureaucracy, and armed with nothing but IT skills and quick wits, Jerry must leave his keyboard comfort one and go face-to-face with elite foreign agents and shut the attack down.”

This intro is a (slightly edited) description of the fiction novel: Virus Bomb by D. Greg Scott. The book was released this past summer.

Greg Scott is a veteran of the tumultuous IT industry. Greg graduated from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana with a double major of math and speech and earned an MBA from the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis. He started Scott Consulting and Infrasupport Corporation with a focus on infrastructure and security. He currently works for an enterprise software company and holds several IT industry certifications, including a CISSP certification. Greg lives in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area with his wife, daughter, and two grandchildren.

Very Brief Book Excerpt

“Hey, Dan.” Jerry said into his cell phone. The Minnesota midafternoon sun shone through his basement window. “I just finished talking to the antivirus team in England. They disassembled the code from Leah’s workstation. And all I can say (Read more…)

Source link

The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Book Review: Virus Bomb – Security Boulevard <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security