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5 Mac Apps That Take Advantage of the M1 Chip | #firefox | #chrome | #microsoftedge | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The awesome power of the new M1 “system in a chip” in Mac computers has stirred excitement in creatives, workers, and Mac-buffs. Not only has it enabled entry-level Macs to […]

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Intel asks #customers to #halt #patching for #chip #bug, citing #flaw

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Intel Corp (INTC.O) said on Monday that patches it released to address two high-profile security vulnerabilities in its chips are faulty, advising customers, computer makers and cloud providers to stop installing them.

Intel Executive Vice President Navin Shenoy disclosed the problem in a statement on the chipmaker’s website, saying that patches released after months of development caused computers to reboot more often than normal and other “unpredictable” behavior. 

“I apologize for any disruption this change in guidance may cause,” Shenoy said. “I assure you we are working around the clock to ensure we are addressing these issues.”

The issue of the faulty patches is separate from complaints by customers for weeks that the patches slow computer performance. Intel has said a typical home and business PC user should not see significant slowdowns.

Intel’s failure to provide a usable patch could cause businesses to postpone purchasing new computers, said IDC analyst Mario Morales.

Intel is ”still trying to get a handle on what’s really happening. They haven’t resolved the matter,” he said.

Intel asked technology providers to start testing a new version of the patches, which it began distributing on Saturday.

The warning came nearly three weeks after Intel confirmed on Jan. 3 that its chips were impacted by vulnerabilities known as Spectre and Meltdown, which make data on affected computers vulnerable to espionage.

Meltdown was specific to chips from Intel, as well as one from SoftBank Group Corp’s (9984.T) ARM Holdings. Spectre affected nearly every modern computing device, including ones with chips from Intel, ARM and Advanced Micro Devices Inc (AMD.O).

Problems with the patches have been growing since Intel on Jan. 11 said they were causing higher reboot rates in its older chips and then last week that the problem was affecting newer processors.

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‘Unhackable’ #electronic #chip being #developed in #Abu Dhabi

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

‘Unhackable’ #electronic #chip being #developed in #Abu Dhabi

Cyber security experts in Abu Dhabi have found a way to create an “unhackable” electronic chip that could potentially be used in phones, cars and computers.

With the evolution of technology and manufacturing process giving way to less safety, researchers at New York University Abu Dhabi have just received a grant to deploy their work into a solution.

“This is the first prototype for a chip that has security features built in at the hardware level,” said Ozgur Sinanoglu, associate dean of engineering and associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the university. “The purpose of this chip is a proof-of-concept to show that we can take any chip design, apply our software on the design to lock [it], and create trustworthy locked chips that are resilient to hardware-level threats such as counterfeiting, piracy, reverse-engineering and tampering.”

His research at the university’s Centre for Cyber Security on hardware security and trust is being funded by the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Defence and the UAE-owned semiconductor manufacturing company Global Foundries, as well as Mubadala Technology.

“We take smart devices for granted but can we really trust them?” asked prof Sinanoglu, who is also the director for design at the excellence lab at the university. “When hackers break into certain devices, they want to share that with everyone so they come up with a set of instructions published on a website. It goes viral and it’s a huge revenue loss for the company.

“Up until a decade ago, this is mainly what hardware security was about – chips with secret assets for people to extract or manipulate this secret information.”

Implications of breach are serious as such chips are found in phones, cars, computers, airplanes, nuclear power plants, medical devices and critical safety and security applications. “So once our trust is compromised on these chips, then it’s compromised on pretty much all applications that [almost] control our lives one way or another,” he said. “Everything used to be centralised in one controlled facility under the control of a few people but now, the process on a single chip spans across the globe, various teams and different companies.”

He spoke of Apple, which has headquarters in California but sources design facilities in Europe, China and India, fabricates in South Korea, tests in Taiwan and assembles its packaging in China.

“Because the flow is highly distributed today, people are concerned about a variety of things,” he said. “We’re talking about all sorts of piracy problems to be able to control chips remotely, or disable them, or leak information from them.”

The new chip ensures a secure platform from start to finish in terms of the hardware.

“If the hardware is compromised, you can have the strongest operation system but you can’t talk about a trustworthy system,” Mr Sinanoglu said. “The UAE is investing heavily in this research and we’re more confident that this will be unhackable because we have mathematical definitions and theorems backing [its] security. We were now offered a grant by the [Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency] as part of a four-university team to turn it into an actual solution that can be deployed and we are hoping to have our software solution adopted by chip design companies so they can produce trustworthy chips.”

He has also set up a platform allowing potential hackers to attempt to break in, because “crowd-sourcing is the best way to test your security”.

“Our locks are in there but they don’t know the secret key,” he added. “We give them virtual access to the chip too but the idea is to see whether someone with this information can break it. We expect no one to.”

Experts said hardware is an area sometimes overlooked in terms of cyber security.

“It’s an issue that is forgotten about,” said Dr Fadi Aloul, head of computer science and engineering at the American University of Sharjah. “Hardware also has bugs and today, with the Internet of Things, those are also being targeted, so it is needed with new smart chips.

“The closer the security measures are to the hardware, the harder it is for the hackers to really take advantage of this chip.”

However, Dr Aloul also said that “unhackable” is very hard to say as the general rule of security is that there is no perfectly secure system. “We can say it’s very hard to hack, but nothing is impossible,” he said. “Given the time and resources, a weakness, like a vulnerability, can be found and exploited.”

Matthew Cochran, chairman of the Defence Services Marketing Council, said security must be holistic as “you are only as strong as the weakest link”.

“Chip security and hardening is fundamental to this as everything else above it in the stack is dependent on the chip not being compromised,” he said. “There is no point in having a secure operating system and encryption if the chip control of all these functions is accessible by [criminals].”

The post ‘Unhackable’ #electronic #chip being #developed in #Abu Dhabi appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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HOW A BUG IN AN OBSCURE CHIP EXPOSED A BILLION SMARTPHONES TO HACKERS

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

IF YOU HAVEN’T updated your iPhone or Android device lately, do it now. Until very recent patches, a bug in a little-examined Wi-Fi chip would have allowed a hacker to invisibly hack into any one of a billion devices. Yes, billion with a b. A vulnerability that pervasive is rare,…

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Man, 60, arrested over chip shop ‘assault’ on boys

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ A 60-year-old man has been arrested after allegedly assaulting two schoolboys in a chip shop. The incident happened on Friday, May 5, at Marco’s Fish and Chips on Caldon Road in …

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Few Retailers Accepting ‘Chip’ Credit Card Payment Feature for Holidays

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Few Retailers Accepting ‘Chip’ Credit Card Payment Feature for Holidays

Maybe you’ve noticed: At many stores, both big and small, you still have to swipe the magnetic stripe on your new chip-enabled credit card, rather than insert or dip it into a chip-reader. Edgar Dworsky, founder of the website ConsumerWorld.org, wondered why he’s rarely asked to dip his smart cards, despite an Oct. 1 “deadline” for retailers to adopt the new standard. So he decided to survey the marketplace last week. He checked 48 national and regional chains and found that only one in four had payment terminals able to process a purchase using the chip security feature in the EMV cards (an acronym derived from Europay, MasterCard and Visa, the three companies that originally developed the standard). “Virtually all – except for Radio Shack – have installed checkout terminals with the card slots for these chip cards, but most of them did not work. They had not turned on the system yet,” Dworsky told NBC News. Only 10 chains in the ConsumerWorld survey have enabled the chip card function chainwide: Best Buy, Home Depot, Lowe’s, Macy’s, Old Navy, Rite Aid, Sam’s Club, Target, Walgreens and Walmart. Big-name national and regional retailers that cannot accept chip cards at some or […]

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Credit card chip tech safer, but could lead to holiday slowdowns

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Credit card chip tech safer, but could lead to holiday slowdowns

New credit cards are arriving all over the county that have security chips that are designed to cut down on fraud. The changeover is leading to some confusion and questions about why its all necessary. One reason is that it moves the U.S. toward a world-wide standard for accepting credit cards. The new cards are called EMV chip cards. That stands for “Europay, Mastercard and Visa. They became the norm in the European Union 10 years ago; in 2012 Canada joined and now, finally, the U.S. has decided it’s time too. Why now? Because almost half of the world’s credit card fraud happens to U.S. consumers. The cards contain tiny chips that give every transaction a unique encryption code, instead of using the same card information over and over, like with the magnetic strip cards we’ve gotten used to swiping. The chip stops thieves from stealing your card info and then duplicating it, according to Carolyn Belfany at Mastercard. “We’ve seen dramatic drops in fraud in other markets as soon as chip cards are distributed to consumers by 70, 80 or more percent,” she said. The chip cards also make retailers liable for any fraudulent transactions that happen at the […]

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Consumers need to watch out for smart chip credit card fraud

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

On the 1st of October, the deadline for credit card retailers & issuers to start supporting smart chip or EMV-chipped credit cards passed. As per experts, these cards help increase the encryption on transactions as it generates a new number & encrypts it every time that the card gets used which theoretically reduces the odds on any credit card fraud. But, there are still a lot of people who believe there are risks still as far as these credit cards are concerned and that fraud is still something that new users of credit cards will have to be wary of. Steve Weisman, of USA Today framed this story by explaining that around 40% of consumers have got their new cards according to a survey conducted by CreditCard.com. A spokeswoman for VISA even said that as of the middle of September, just 20% of their card holders had received the new EMV-chip cards. That is 151.8 million of their customers but still a very small part of their entire customer base. This is where scam artists have the potential to get involved. Weisman spoke about how these scammers benefit from this problem of not enough people having chip credit cards. They […]

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Credit card overhaul will chip away at fraud

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Look carefully at your credit or debit card. If it’s less than a year old, it likely has a “chip” on the front of the card. It is an icon with a dull sheen located near the card’s logo. If there is a shiny hologram on either the front or back, that does not count; it is not a chip. The scary thing for me is that my credit cards are older. Only one has a chip. But Oct. 1 is the cutoff for banking and business to begin officially converting over to credit and debit cards that include a chip. Cardholders were notified on their monthly billing statements to consider calling for a new card. Businesses were notified by hard copy from the banks and, in many cases, repeatedly by recorded messages on the telephone to change their card readers. If the card has a chip on it, it was processed over the last year and is part of a new safeguard against bogus credit and debit cards. Businesses already are getting equipped with new machines to read credit and debit card chips to go along with the existing magnetic stripe while accepting payment for a sale. Credit cards […]

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New chip technology fights credit-card fraud at retailers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

If you are like me, you have received a number of replacement credit cards in the past several months, even though your current card is nowhere near its expiration date. The driving force behind this is the growing amount of credit card fraud occurring at retailers, like those memorable cases involving Target and Neiman Marcus. While most of the rest of the world stopped using vulnerable credit cards with the easily copied magnetic strips many years ago, the United States has failed to adopt newer technology that is much more fraud-resistant. That is changing as of Oct. 1 this year. EMV chip technology (EMV stands for Europay, MasterCard, and Visa – the three companies that innovated this more secure type of credit card technology) has been around for quite a while. Europe began using the technology around 2005. Cards with EMV chips are inserted into the credit card reader (rather than the swiping that we are familiar with), a cryptogram code is generated for one-time use, and the transaction is approved or declined. The one-time-use cryptogram code is the primary security feature, because fraudsters are unable to create a fraudulent chip that would generate the same code as the real card. […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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