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#hacking | Black Hat Asia 2020 postponed due to coronavirus epidemic

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Security conference was due to open its doors in Singapore next month

The upcoming Black Hat Asia security conference has been postponed due to ongoing concerns surrounding the latest coronavirus outbreak, event organizer Informa has confirmed.

“After careful consideration of the health and safety of our attendees and partners, we have made the difficult decision to postpone Black Hat Asia 2020 due to the coronavirus outbreak,” read an announcement, issued via  the official Black Hat Events Twitter account.

Black Hat Asia was due to take place at the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore from March 31 to April 3.

The Asian edition, one of three Black Hat security conferences that take place around the world each year, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2019, with infosec luminary Mikko Hyppönen delivering the keynote.

Security expert Mikko Hyppönen delivering the keynote at Black Hat Asia last year

With its origins being traced to Wuhan, China, the coronavirus outbreak in question refers specifically to the novel strain of pathogen now known as COVID-19.

According to a situation report (PDF) from the World Health Organization yesterday (February 13), there have been nearly 47,000 confirmed cases of infection globally, with more than 1,300 deaths.

News of the Black Hat Asia postponement follows a similar announcement earlier this week that Mobile World Congress 2020 would not go ahead in Barcelona this month due to concerns surrounding the virus.

DEF CON China, a hacking event that was slated to take place in Beijing in April, was also postponed last month due to concerns surrounding COVID-19.

“Our sympathies are with those affected during this difficult time,” an announcement on the Black Hat Events website read.

“Please know we are planning to host Black Hat Asia 2020 in the fall this year. We hope you are able to join us and will provide an update with the new event dates as soon as possible.”

The announcement as it appears on the Black Hat Asia website

RELATED The next arms race: Cyber threats pulled into stark focus at Black Hat Asia 2019

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Coronavirus Raises New Business Continuity, …

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

What happens when understaffed security teams at home and abroad are sequestered in physical quarantine zones?

(image by Romolo Tavani, via Adobe Stock)

(image by Romolo Tavani, via Adobe Stock)

Cyberattackers are barraging businesses with phishing lures touting fake info about the Coronavirus. And although the lures may be fake, the security and business continuity threats that some IT departments are preparing for are quite real. One big question: If workers are sequestered in physical quarantine zones, will IT and SecOps be able to continue? 

Initially, businesses may dismiss this risk until the virus reaches their regions. However, the risk is more prevalent as the IT supply chain becomes more global and organizations rely on overseas IT services — from help desks to 24/7 SOC-as-a-service. The concern is not just that workers themselves may get infected by the virus; the concern is that employees, contractors, and service providers’ workers who are not infected could nevertheless be quarantined for being in physical proximity to the infected individual. 

“If you’ve got 200 workers working in one place and one of them presents themselves with the illness, it’s pretty likely the government is going to quarantine everybody,” says Edward Minyard, senior consultant at IP Architects, who was an Accenture consultant working with Mexico City on pandemic prevention during the H1N1 virus spread in 2019. “And the current [quarantine] protocol is for 14 days. So that can have a material impact on folks’ planning.

“If you’ve got a large outsourced facility, for example, for your security management, or any facilty with a large number of people in it, you probably don’t want to bring 100 people together and put them in a small room unless you yourself have some evidence that they have not been affected. … And the second part of the challenge is they may not be able to get there. Or even want to go there.”

Minyard says his American clients are beginning to consider the secondary impact they may feel if the virus further expands in, for example, India, a source of so many IT services. (Although India shares its norther border with China, it has thus far experienced only three confirmed cases of the virus, according to the World Health Organization, all of which are in Kerala, a western coastal state that does not border China.)

Nevertheless, Indian businesses have reported disruptions because of the stoppages in shipments from China, where over 45,000 confirmed infections and over 1,000 deaths have been reported, and many millions are in quarantine. All the way over in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress — the world’s biggest trade show for the mobile phone industry — was canceled just one week before it was set to start. 

Ths same challenges also apply to telecoms, electric companies, “and all the others that maintain the networks that are supposed to be supporting the rest of us,” Minyard says.

“From the perspective of business continuity and continuity of operations, this is a real thing,” he says. “This is not speculation. This is going on, and we don’t know how bad it’s going to be. Should you have all your eggs in one basket … I’d be thinking of a different plan.” 

IT security departments, already short-staffed, could be stressed even further than most other teams. And that’s something about the coronavirus that cyberattackers will surely capitalize on — just as they have already.  

Phishing Extravaganza 
Cybersecurity companies have been spilling over with detections and reports of phishing messages that use coronavirus-related lures. The messages include malicious links and attachments and download a variety of malware, from Emotet to wipers to remote access Trojans (RATs).  

The World Health Organization issued a warning about such scams.

Trustwave reported an Office 365 credential-stealing attack, which used a lure appearing to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (complete with CDC logo and legitimate display address) and the subject header “New case confirmed in your city.”  

Proofpoint discovered a credential-stealer that capitalized on panic with a lure claiming that a secret cure existed and that the government was using the disease as a government bioweapon.

Proofpoint, as well as Cisco Talos, reported messages purporting to provide tips for virus protection; these appeared to be sent not only by official government organizations, but by businesses’ upper management. These messages were used to steal credentials, drop malware like Emotet and — in lures specifically targeting the manufacturing and shipping industries — the Nanocore RAT. 

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Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad … View Full Bio

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | MAS reminds of vigilance against cyber threats taking advantage of coronavirus situation

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans SINGAPORE: The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) reminded financial institutions to remain vigilant on the cybersecurity front amid cases of “cyber threat actors” taking advantage of the coronavirus situation to conduct email scams, phishing and ransomware attacks.  In a media release on Sunday (Feb 9), MAS said […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Coronavirus Scams: Phishing, Fake Alerts and Cyberthreats

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Wherever you turn for news coverage online, coronavirus alarm bells are ringing louder.

But users should not trust all of those bells, as fake news, phishing scams and even malicious malware is actively being distributed under the coronavirus umbrella.   

Sadly, a perfect storm may be brewing. As government officials and health experts appeal louder for calm, the public is actually getting more worried and searching the Internet for answers. For example:

On Friday, Jan. 31, fears slammed the U.S. stock market, according to Axios. “Stocks saw the worst sell-off in months on Friday: the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 603 points (2.1%), while the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq declined 1.7% and 1.5%, respectively. …”

Meanwhile, the BBC reported that the U.S. and Australia have joined Russia, Japan, Pakistan and Italy in closing their borders to all foreign nationals arriving from China. These actions were taken despite conflicting advice from global health officials. “Travel restrictions can cause more harm than good by hindering info-sharing, medical supply chains and harming economies,” the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday.

At the same time, Bloomberg news reported that China Virus Cases May Be Undercounted Even With 3,000% Surge. “The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in China has skyrocketed to more than 9,000, surpassing the official count during the SARS epidemic. …”

 
 

Coronavirus Is a Bonanza for Online Scams and Fake News

As expected, the rapid spread of the coronavirus, along with the expanded media coverage of surrounding events related to this global health emergency, has led to hoaxes and the spread of panic. According to CNN, “In Los Angeles County, public health officials warned residents Thursday that a letter claiming a potential coronavirus outbreak in Carson City (Read more…)

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Coronavirus Scams: Prepare for Phishing Emails, Fake Alerts and Cyberthreats

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Wherever you turn for news coverage online, Coronavirus alarm bells are ringing louder.

But users should not trust all of those bells, as fake news, phishing scams and even malicious malware is actively being distributed under the Coronavirus umbrella.   

Sadly, a perfect storm may be brewing.  As government officials and health experts appeal louder for calm, the public is actually getting more worried and searching the Internet for answers. For example:

On Friday, January 31, fears slammed the U.S. stock market, according to Axios. “Stocks saw the worst sell-off in months on Friday: the Dow Jones Industrials Average dropped 603 points (2.1%), while the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq declined 1.7% and 1.5%, respectively. …”

Meanwhile, the BBC reported that the U.S. and Australia have joined Russia, Japan, Pakistan and Italy in closing their borders to all foreign nationals arriving from China. These actions were taken despite conflicting advice from global health officials. “Travel restrictions can cause more harm than good by hindering info-sharing, medical supply chains and harming economies,” the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday.

At the same time, Bloomberg news reported that China Virus Cases May Be Undercounted Even With 3,000% Surge. “The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in China has skyrocketed to more than 9,000, surpassing the official count during the SARS epidemic. …”

 

Coronavirus is a Bonanza for Online Scams and Fake News

As expected, the rapid spread of the Coronavirus, along with the expanded media coverage of surrounding events related to this global health emergency, has led to hoaxes and the spread of panic. According to CNN, “In Los Angeles County, public health officials warned residents Thursday that a letter claiming a potential coronavirus outbreak in Carson City is (Read more…)

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#comptia | Google searches for coronavirus will now show you safety tips

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Searching Google for “coronavirus” will now send users to a curated search results page with resources from the World Health Organization, safety tips, and news updates, Google and the WHO announced today. This effort, which is just one of Google’s SOS Alerts, is now live. Google […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com