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#bumble | #tinder | #pof Bumble warns Apple privacy push could hurt business in IPO filing – Dating Scams 101 | romancescams | #scams

The dating app Bumble used its IPO filing on Friday to warn investors Apple’s ongoing efforts to improve user privacy may hurt its bottom line in the long run. On Friday, Bumble filed its IPO with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which reveals Bumble’s plans ahead of selling stock to the public for […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#onlinedating | ‘Sex and the City’ Fans Think Mr. Big Could Die in Revival, Sarah Jessica Parker Reacts | #bumble | #tinder | romancescams | #scams

Sex and the City fans think that Mr. Big could die in the hit comedy’s upcoming revival, and series star Sarah Jessica Parker is reacting to the theory. Hollywood Life reports that the chatter began after a Origins podcast host James Andrew Miller stated in 2018 that Mr. Big, played by Chris Noth, was originally […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#childsafety | BILL OWNEY | GOOD AS GOLD: A minivan a poet could fall in love with | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

“Load every rift with ore,” Romantic poet John Keats advised his friend and mentor Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1820. Shelley, famous for making his quill pen fly across the pages while munching soda crackers during all-night writing sessions, was rich, famous, a rock star of his age. He was a great poet but, had he […] View full post on National Cyber Security

QB Daniel Jones questionable, could start Sunday for Giants | #schoolshooting | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Dec. 25, 2020Updated: Dec. 25, 2020 4:01 p.m. EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — The New York Giants might be closer to getting back starting quarterback Daniel Jones. Jones was listed as […] View full post on National Cyber Security

School Administration Software Market 2020: Potential Growth, Challenges, and Know the Companies List Could Potentially Benefit or Loose out From the Impact of COVID-19 | Key Players: Rediker Software, ThinkWave, PowerVista RollCall, Fedena, RenWeb, etc. | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

School Administration Software Market 2020: Potential Growth, Challenges, and Know the Companies List Could Potentially Benefit or Loose out From the Impact of COVID-19 | Key Players: Rediker Software, ThinkWave, […]

The post School Administration Software Market 2020: Potential Growth, Challenges, and Know the Companies List Could Potentially Benefit or Loose out From the Impact of COVID-19 | Key Players: Rediker Software, ThinkWave, PowerVista RollCall, Fedena, RenWeb, etc. | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | #parenting | #parenting | #kids appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#parent | #kids | Stimulus check money: A $1,200 payment could still go out in 2020 | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Calculate the maximum payment that could end up in your pocket if another stimulus package comes your way. Sarah Tew/CNET Now that the 2020 Republican and Democratic national conventions are history, […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#romancescams | FBI warns people stuck at home could be more vulnerable to online romance scams | romancescams | #scams

They send flowers. They spend months chatting online. They share poems expressing their love. For people forced to stay home during the pandemic, an online connection can offer solace and […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#bumble | #tinder | #pof Trending Reddit Dating Advice Could Be A Lifesaver For Singles | romancescams | #scams

ttps://www.dmarge.com/”http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd”> It should be common knowledge now but it’s worth reiterating just for posterity’s sake: looks aren’t everything when it comes to dating – your personality and attitude are crucial […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Could fighting coronavirus compromise cybersecurity?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The COVID-19 pandemic has become a sobering experience in many ways. We are witnessing firsthand the negative impact that a fragmented national public health system has on our safety, health and economy. 

Social isolation has become a stark reality and necessity for people around the globe, including here in the United States. While social distancing has become the operational approach to slow down the spread of the COVID-19 virus (or at least flatten the infection curve), this isolation has ripple effects across other components of our lives. A vast number of people will telecommute and work from home. Schools at the K-12 and university levels are instructing students to stay away from campus and suspending face-to-face teaching. Faculty are moving all classes online. The entertainment and sports industries are canceling events and premiers, and restaurants and bars are closing. Major studios are rushing to push content to streaming services; the list will continue. 

While these responses are prudent, the result is that more of our daily routines are dependent on the internet, internet technologies and telecommunications. This strategy to move to the online cyber and virtual realm, at least in the interim, is happening with no real thought about the cybersecurity implications.

Historically, cybercriminals have used crises to increase criminal activity and scams related to stealing personally identifiable information, as well as financial and personal health Information to defraud victims. Foreign actors have spread disinformation and attempted to disrupt recovery operations as a means of causing more chaos. The same thing is happening and will continue to happen with the COVID-19 crisis. 

We already see cyberattacks against the U.S. Health and Human Services Department, and similar attacks in Europe. Scammers are sending fake emails and setting up fake COVID-19 health information websites, trying to phish user IDs and passwords. Other scammers are pretending to raise money to assist with replacement lunch programs for students or the isolated elderly. No one should be surprised to see a jump in cyber-criminal activity, as these people are opportunistic. We find ourselves in the perfect storm for cyberattacks.

Increased cyberattacks are not the only ripple effect we could see. The telecommunications and mobile network operators’ critical infrastructure must absorb an exponential increase in demand, with little or no ramp-up time. Similar to the public health system, these industries are fragmented and equally unprepared or capable across companies and regions. Internet and mobile network operators will find their resources pushed to the maximum. 

We need only to look at recent natural disasters such as floods and tornadoes to see how fragile this infrastructure is. The ability to communicate either via email or mobile phone with emergency services, loved ones or the media to get information disseminated is essential during a crisis and the ensuing recovery period. 

Social isolation will put a significant burden on the telecommunications and mobile network infrastructure. We will now have millions of people working from home using local or regional providers to connect to company networks. K-12 and university students are trying to resume their studies online using e-learning, placing more burden on networks and the infrastructure. People will increase their use of streaming media for news and entertainment purposes, including on their mobile devices. 

This increased demand will also not follow the regular demand cycles, at least in the foreseeable future — school time, the typical workday and leisure activities no longer have rigid schedules; they will be somewhat blended together. This lack of regular routines could potentially magnify the demand and further negatively impact bandwidth and availability.

We must understand that with our increased dependence on technology and cyber, there are increased risks that we need to be aware of and plan for. Governments, businesses and schools need to provide some direction and advice to the general public on how to follow not only appropriate “anti-COVID-19 hygiene” but also “cybersecurity hygiene.” 

Since networks will now be extended to homes during this time, similar cybersecurity policies, practices and standards that someone would adhere to if they were physically sitting at work or school need to apply.

We may also need to consider metering our online behavior to essential activities such as those related to our work, education or critical communications, or at the very least following the more regular rhythm of the day — routine work or school hours.

We will learn many lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the cost will be high in terms of lives and the economy. Hopefully, when we come out on the other side of this crisis, we will also have a better understanding of how to protect our critical infrastructures and the real risks of living even deeper in cyberspace.

Dr. Marcus Rogers is a professor and executive director of cybersecurity programs at Purdue University; he has over 25 years of experience in public- and private-sector consulting in the area of information technology security, and has consulted for the military, law enforcement and for some of the largest financial and health care providers in the world.

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#deepweb | A Public Index for the Web? How the Blockchain Could Potentially Fight Deepfakes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Over the past two years a cottage industry has emerged of media experts and journalists warning of the potential dangers of “deep fakes.” Videos of Vladimir Putin or Barack Obama saying whatever a video-editor wants them to say have been widely shared on mainstream networks to raise fears over privacy and the dangerous “post-truth” world of the Internet. 

While most mainstream networks have a vested interest in questioning the legitimacy of digital and citizen-led news, there is no doubt that verifying video content is becoming more difficult. 

On the one hand, deep fakes are likely to become a central component of internet culture, fueling the political caricature and memes of tomorrow. On the other hand, there is a darker side. It’s not unrealistic to envision a future in which videos from inside Syria or a protest in Iraq are doctored in a way that could alter our understanding of key events.

It’s not unrealistic to envision a future in which videos from inside Syria or a protest in Iraq are doctored in a way that could alter our understanding of key events.

The blockchain may have a solution. According to Amy James of Alexandria Labs, one of the fundamental problems of the web is that there is no public index. Today when we search the web, we’re searching a private index. This makes detecting changes to search rankings, or the de-platforming of certain ideas and even individuals, very difficult to determine.
 


Amy James of the’Open Index Protocol’ explains how a distributed global index for the web could help fight deepfakes.
 

There’s also a less obvious reason why a public index might be a good idea. James argues that “because the web doesn’t have a transparent, secure and version-controlled index it can be difficult to discern truth from fiction online.”

“the web was intended to be fully decentralised.”

On a blockchain immutable index in which every ‘transaction’ is public and recorded, it should be easier to notice when a video is first uploaded and edited, or if different versions of the exact same video are in existence. 

James adds “the web was intended to be fully decentralised.” The apps we all know and love – from Spotify, to Netflix – provide customization and allow networks to scale. At the same time, “private companies build the walled garden infrastructure that we have today so the web could scale and be convenient.” While this model maybe profitable, it centralizes information and control in the hands of closed platforms. “When the web was developing in the early 90s the technology didn’t exist yet to build an index as an open standard protocol,” states James.

“When the web was developing in the early 90s the technology didn’t exist yet to build an index as an open standard protocol”

Alexandria Labs believes the future is a “fully decentralized open protocol for indexing and distribution.” Instead of artificial barriers to content access, an open-source and decentralized protocol would index all public data on the Web, recording it on the blockchain. That’s one way of figuring out if a video of Nancy Pelsoi drunk is actually real. 
 

Full disclosure: Al Bawaba is exploring blockchain solutions on the Open Index Protocol. 

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