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Chicago indie band community supports each other and create new music | #College. | #Students | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

[ad_1] While lamenting canceled shows, artists in the Chicago indie music scene have taken the opportunity to write songs and record new material. The local alternative rock circuit includes venues such as Lincoln Hall, Hideout Chicago and Beat Kitchen. “The Chicago music scene is unfathomably based on community, love and support. ” Taylor Ericson, lead […]

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How to use tinder to create virtual sparks | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Let’s wind the clocks back to January of this year. I was getting involved in campus life for the first time as a writer for The Poly Post. I was […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#infosec | #RSAC: Realize the Harms and Benefits of Technology and Create Policies to Enable the Public

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Speaking at the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) summit at the RSA Conference in San Francisco, Alex Stamos, adjunct professor at Stanford University’s Freeman-Spogli Institute, said that issues and decisions made by technology companies have angered people.

Stamos, who previously served as CISO of both Facebook and Yahoo, said that once he stepped out of those roles and “out of constant emergencies” he could see the bigger picture.

He said that “tradeoffs from a policy perspective are poorly understood by the public and usually go back to the engineering adage of do you want it done correctly, cheaply, or quickly—pick 1 of 3.” Stamos said that this is a basic problem of society, as people say that they don’t want companies looking at their data, but to stop bad things happening you need to see bad things. “Politicians say companies have to find the bad guys, but you cannot have two things.”

Another issue Stamos highlighted is the balance that technology companies have for “solving societal ills,” as he pointed out that technology companies provide platforms while “every bad thing [that] happened [was] done by people.”

He said that companies have to “embrace transparency and make decisions in a transparent manner.” However, the line has to be drawn around bullying and harassment, as “nothing has changed since the last election.”

Stamos said that Google, Facebook, and Twitter came up with policies on political advertising “in closed rooms with no transparency,” and these will be the rules that the 2020 election will be fought on.

He recommended that the tech industry adopt a regulatory framework similar to what Germany did regarding what speech is allowed online, but should consider how this can be adopted by countries with reduced democratic freedoms. “Or you end up with tech companies who are happy if they get regulated if they can make money, as most people who use the internet don’t live in democracies, or if they do, it is with reduced free speech.”

Stamos concluded by saying that we “have to realize that technology has made changes in good and bad ways” and take responsibility for that.

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How #quantum #computing could create #unbreakable #encryption and save the #future of #cybersecurity

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A new breakthrough in quantum computing may mean quantum key distribution (QKD) is on its way toward being a practical cybersecurity protocol.

Researchers at Duke University, The Ohio State University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have announced in the latest issue of Science Advances that they’ve increased the speed of QKD transmission by between five and 10 times the current rates.

Up until this latest breakthrough, which is delivering megabit/second rates, speeds were restricted to between tens to hundreds of kilobits a second.

What is quantum key distribution?

It sounds like something straight out of science fiction, but quantum key distribution is reality, and it could be protecting your data before you know it.

QKD uses photons—particles of light—to encode data in qubits, or quantum bits. The qubits are transmitted to a sender and recipient as an encryption key, and here’s where things get crazy: The transmission channels don’t need to be secure.

QKD’s whole purpose rests on quantum indeterminacy, which states that measuring something affects its original state. In the case of QKD, measuring photonic qubits affects their encoding, which allows the sender and recipient to immediately know if a hacker is trying to crack their quantum encryption key.

That means, theoretically at least, that QKD would be a perfect encryption: Any attempts to crack it would immediately be noticed and keys could be changed.

Making QKD practical for cybersecurity

The breakthrough made by the Duke research team came from being able to pack more data onto a single photon. The trick was learning to adjust the time at which the photon was released, along with adjusting the phase of the photon, causing it to be able to hold two bits of information instead of just one.

What makes the new system developed by the researchers even more amazing is that they were able to do it with nothing but commercially available telecommunication hardware, save the single-photon detector.

“With some engineering,” said Duke graduate student Nurul Taimur Islam, “we could probably fit the entire transmitter and receiver in a box as big as a computer CPU.”

Islam and his research partners say that hardware imperfections render their QKD system less than hack-proof, but their research continues to incorporate hardware shortcomings to make up for them.

“We wanted to identify every experimental flaw in the system, and include these flaws in the theory so that we could ensure our system is secure and there is no potential side-channel attack,” Islam said.

While it’s likely to take some time to emerge from the research phase and become a practical tool, this latest QKD breakthrough gives cybersecurity a leg up on cybercriminals.

As quantum computing becomes accessible, the likelihood of it being used to obliterate current forms of encryption increases, making the development of practical QKD essential. This should come as good news to anyone concerned about the current, and future, state of cybersecurity.

The post How #quantum #computing could create #unbreakable #encryption and save the #future of #cybersecurity appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Severe flaws in DNS app create hacking risk for routers, smartphones, computers, IoT

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Google researchers found seven severe security flaws in the open-source DNS software package Dnsmasq. The flaws put a huge number of devices at risk of being hacked. Google researchers disclosed seven serious flaws in an open-source DNS software package Dnsmasq, which is is commonly preinstalled on routers, servers, smartphones, IoT…

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Could voting fraud panel create an easy target for hackers?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Officials from both parties had a consistent answer last year when asked about the security of voting systems: U.S. elections are so decentralized that it would be impossible for hackers to manipulate ballot counts or voter rolls on a wide scale. But the voter fraud commission established by President Donald…

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HOW EMPLOYEES CREATE CYBERSECURITY RISKS

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans A new report shows that business leaders aren’t just worried about employees causing cybersecurity attacks, but hiding them as well. Also: Facebook now allows Groups within Pages. By now, we all know that all employees—not just IT staff—are responsible for preventing cybersecurity attacks. But prevention isn’t […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Protect Four Key Areas To Create A Balanced Cybersecurity Portfolio

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

For this article, I had the chance to speak with Jay Chaudhry, the CEO and Founder of Zscaler. Zscaler bills itself as a cloud cybersecurity solution, or “Security as a Service.” Zscaler has a unique approach to cybersecurity, one that fits into my balanced cybersecurity framework, but that also dispels…

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Webcams, cameras create suspicion, paranoia

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Surveillance cameras and webcams are becoming increasingly prevalent, making it possible to frequently record a person’s actions. Many times these cameras are visible, but other times they’re hidden or used in ways the recorded people are not aware of. Consciousness of cameras may affect behavior and mental health. Marina Lowe,…

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Hack Back law would create cyber vigilantes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hack Back law would create cyber vigilantes

The Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act revision demonstrates what happens when you rely upon limited information and a cowboy mentality. Tom Graves (R-GA) released an update to the initial Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act (ACDC) that intends to exempt victims of cyber attacks from being prosecuted for attempting to hack…

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