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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | FBI Publishes 2019 Internet Crimes Report Causing 3.5 Billion Dollars Loss

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans


As the internet has become an indispensable part of our lives, crimes committed on the internet have started to increase significantly. In the 2019 report of the FBI, it was emphasized that cybercrime cost $ 3.5 billion.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) published the ‘2019 Internet Crimes Report’. According to the published report, the number of crimes complained during the year reached 467 thousand 361. The cost of the crimes complaining exceeds $ 3.5 billion.

Cybercrime increased in 2019
The Internet Crime Complaints Center (IC3), an FBI source that reports suspected cybercrime activities, was established in May 2020 and reached a total number of 4,883,231 complaints with 2019 reports.

While the number of complaints received in the last five years has reached 1.7 million, the total annual loss has increased from $ 1.1 billion (2015) to $ 3.5 billion (2019). The damage of cybercrime to individuals and businesses in the US has exceeded $ 10 billion in the past five years. 2019 was the worst year in this respect. During the year, the highest cyber crime complaints ever made, while the victims of cyber crime have also suffered their greatest losses. In the fight against cybercrime, an amount of $ 300 million was saved.

Company emails
In the fraudulent activities carried out via company e-mails, more than $ 1.7 billion was lost. A total of 23,775 complaints were made in this area in 2019. Business email scams have become the most dangerous group in cybercrime.

“Many organizations have been vulnerable to email attacks because criminals are developing their methods to compromise traditional email,” said Cencornet CEO Ed Macnair. The attackers targeted the most CEOs and staff working in the financial department in these areas.

Macnair said that cybercriminals trick employees and steal valuable information by using e-mail addresses similar to trusted companies’ e-mails. Macnair said this method is very difficult to catch by traditional defense systems and companies need to improve their security techniques.

Ransomware
The FBI warned about the magnitude of the ransomware’s impact on businesses and organizations. In the ransomware attack against the city of New Orleans in December 2019, it was revealed that the FBI’s warnings were not taken seriously.

In 2018, there were some reductions in complaints about ransomware attacks, but this number increased again in 2019 and reached the highest number of complaints after 2016. Ransomware attacks caused $ 2.4 million of damage in 2016, up from $ 8.9 million in 2019.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | SunLive – NZ losing millions from cyber crimes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Potentially the biggest tech issue New Zealanders will confront this year, will be the growing impact of fake news and an inability to discern real from fake, says NZTech chief executive Graeme Muller says. With massive increases in scams and phishing, criminals are benefiting from Kiwis’ […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Online radicalisation and cyber attacks to be among the high tech crimes targeted by new facility at the University of Bradford

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A HIGH tech centre dedicated to cyber security has been opened at the University of Bradford, and one of its first projects it to look at how to deal with online radicalisation. The Cyber Security Interdisciplinary Centre will see students using top technology to research the ever evolving online world…

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Former school principal pleads guilty to child sex crimes

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ TROY, Mo. — (KTVI) — A former elementary school principal pleaded guilty Wednesday to 16 counts of sex crimes involving children as part of a plea agreement, the Troy Police Department …

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Government to create Computer & Cybercrime Management Centre to deal with crimes like social media abuse & cyberterrorism

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Government to create Computer & Cybercrime Management Centre to deal with crimes like social media abuse & cyberterrorism

Zimbabwe’s draft ICT legislation on cybercrime, electronic transactions, and data has drawn a lot of attention in the past month as an increasing number of citizens pay close attention the impact that these laws will have in their lives.
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Bullying, Crimes Down in U.S. Schools, Fed Data Finds – Inside School Research – Education Week

Students see school as a safer place today than in prior years, according to new data from an annual federal report.

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#pso #htcs #b4inc

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Crimes against local businesses increase

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The business community of Wadeville, as well as business owners in the rest of the Elsburg policing area, are warned to be on high alert. The warning from the Elsburg SAPS comes after several crime incidents were reported to the police. The following crimes are currently prevalent within the business sector: Robberies with firearms. Business burglaries. Theft of cars (parked outside business premises). Theft of cargo stored in trucks and containers, etc. Hijackings of both cars and trucks. As a proactive measure, the SAPS calls on the business community to do the following to protect assets and the lives of employees: Improve your company’s security system (burglar proofing, alarm, etc.). Ensure the surveillance cameras are in good working order. Keep a watchful eye on your surroundings, for example, suspicious activities (vehicles with more than one occupant) at all times. Change from a cash salary payment system to an electronic banking system (avoid carrying lump sums of money from the bank to the business). Ensure that your security company’s panic button is in good working order. In case of an emergency, instruct your security company to call 10111 and the Elsburg SAPS (011 827-2306/5631) simultaneously, as they can attend the scene […]

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Police step up use of technology to solve gun crimes

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Viewers of TV crime shows are familiar with plots that involve police investigators solving gun crimes with high-tech ballistics tests.

But while these tests are a popular with Hollywood script writers, the real life technology has not always been a favorite of police departments in the Puget Sound region.

A 2013 KING 5 Investigation revealed that many Washington State police departments submitted only a small percentage of the guns seized in their work for ballistics tests.

Three years later, it’s a very different story, thanks to a renewed push from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab and Seattle Police.

“My goal was to make it better than what it had been in the past. It had been underutilized before in the past by all law enforcement from federal, state and local levels,” said Special Agent Douglas Dawson, who heads the ATF office in Seattle.

For the two and half years that he’s been in charge, Dawson has ramped up use of the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS). He said his office has charted a six fold increase in the past few years in the number of ballistics “hits” that IBIS has detected in Seattle-area gun cases.

IBIS stores and analyzes images of shell casings – the brass casing that is left behind when a bullet is fired from a gun. Each gun makes unique tool marks on the casing. IBIS can find matches among millions of shell casings from crime guns across the country – and link together cases where there was no known connection.

When cases are linked, investigators gain a wealth of new information that can lead to a break.

Dawson says there used to be 25 or 30 IBIS hits a year in Seattle.

“Last year we were up to about 180 – I think 179 was the official record,” said Dawson.

Dawson said one reason police departments don’t use IBIS is because it can often be time consuming for them to test fire all the guns they seize, and then hand deliver the shell casings to the crime lab.

Dawson urges departments to test all guns and casings they come across, because investigators never know when one was used in another crime. The ATF now offers its personnel to help with firearms testing.

The State Patrol crime lab in Seattle addressed another complaint that detectives have had about IBIS. Lab techs are trying to give detectives speedier results so that they get useful information from ballistics tests in days – not weeks or months.

“Ideally, within 72 hours or less is when we have that prime window,” said IBIS technician Jennifer Tardiff of WSP’s Seattle crime lab.

By streamlining the process and producing results, Dawson hopes that police agencies submit more shell casings – and solve more cases big and small.

Last year, Byron Vierling spied a handgun stashed in the seat in the back of the Metro bus he was riding.

“The gun was pointed towards me with the stock up in the air,” Vierling told KING 5. “I was very nervous,” he said.

Vierling called Seattle police to report the firearm.

IBIS determined that shell cases retrieved when the gun was test-fired matched shell casings from a “shots fired” call in Seattle’s Lake City neighborhood.

Police had questioned a woman who boarded the bus two days before Vierling rode it. The woman was seen walking away from a man who had fired shots in the air.

However, when police questioned her on the bus they could not find and gun – or any evidence that she was connected to the shots fired call.

When IBIS linked the two cases, police reviewed Metro bus video that appeared to show the woman reaching down behind a seat to hide something.

“It looks like she’s putting the gun right where I found it,” Vierling said when KING 5 showed him the video.

When confronted with the video a month after Vierling found the gun, the woman confessed to police that she’s stashed it on the bus to help out the friend who fired it.

After the woman’s confession, that friend — Sean Summers, a felon who was not allowed to have a gun — pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of a firearm.

Dawson credited Seattle police officers who submitted the shell casings from the shots fired call and the casings from the gun on the bus.

“Had that gun been taken into custody two years ago it may have sat in an evidence vault on a shelf and never been tested,” said Dawson.

Of course, IBIS can solve the most serious crimes as well.

When one-year-old Malajha Grant was killed in a drive by shooting in Kent last year, police and the ATF submitted shell casings they found at the scene to the WSP crime lab in Seattle.

In 24 hours, IBIS spit out a lead that led to the arrest of a suspect.

The shell casings matched those found at a shooting 24 hours earlier in Seattle that was recorded on video.

“We were able to obtain a video that had two people in it that had weapons and at least one of those weapons was used in our murder less than 24 hours later,” said Kent Police Chief Ken Thomas.
Source:http://www.king5.com/news/local/investigations/police-step-up-use-of-technology-to-solve-gun-crimes/129810229

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Ex-Subway pitchman Jared Fogle appealing sentence for sex crimes

Former Subway pitchman Jared Fogle is appealing the more than 15-year prison sentence he received for possessing child pornography and having sex with underage prostitutes, which was longer than the maximum term prosecutors agreed to pursue as part of his plea deal.

Attorney Ron Elberger said Tuesday that he’s appealing Fogle’s sentence, but he declined to discuss it in detail. He filed the notice of appeal in federal court in Indianapolis on Monday.

Fogle pleaded guilty last month to one count each of distributing and receiving child porn and traveling to engage in illicit sexual conduct with a child. As part of his plea deal, he agreed not to seek a sentence of less than five years in prison and prosecutors agreed not to push for more than 12 1/2 years behind bars.

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I watch child pornography to prosecute sex crimes. The kids’ silence is deafening.

During my first week as a federal prosecutor of sexual abuse crimes against children, one of my colleagues told me her chief coping mechanism: Turn the sound off when you have to watch a video multiple times. This advice scared me. I imagined children screaming, crying and shrieking in pain — the stuff of nightmares.

My office is responsible for investigating and prosecuting such crimes, namely the production, possession and trafficking of child pornography. My first case file contained multiple CDs and DVDs showing a young girl being sexually abused by her father, who filmed his crimes with a handheld camera. Despite my colleague’s warning, I knew I couldn’t remain deaf during my first pass at the evidence.

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