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5 ways to be a bit safer this Data Privacy Day – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Today is Data Privacy Day. As we say every year, Data Privacy Day is more than just a 24-hour period when you try to keep safe online. It’s a day to think about changes you can make in your digital life that will keep you safer […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Griffiss Institute marks commitment to Data Privacy Day, shares safety advice

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Griffiss Institute is marking its commitment to Data Privacy Day by signing on as a 2020 “Champion” for the observance, an international effort held annually Jan. 28 to create awareness about importance of respecting privacy and safeguarding data. As a “Champion,” Griffiss Institute recognizes and supports […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Protecting Real Estate for Data Privacy Day — RISMedia |

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Jan. 28 is Data Privacy Day, as set by the National Cyber Security Alliance’s (NCSA) Data Privacy Day campaign. The NCSA provides various resources on its website, including instructions on how businesses can protect themselves, detect fraud, respond quickly and recover if they have fallen victim.

How do these translate into real estate best practices?

Protect
The NCSA recommends that businesses keep software current, ensure updates are set to automatically install, implement stronger authentication processes, back up all information either in the cloud or on a hard drive, limit access to sensitive data and stay vigilant.

For real estate agents and brokers, that means keeping vulnerable data, such as transaction paperwork with client signatures, protected by double verification, as well as backed up to a secure location. Platforms such as DocuSign and ShelterZoom are helping to make transactions more secure in real estate by using technology such as encryption and blockchain.

According to Chen Konfino, chief executive of Younity, an app that allows users to remotely access their digital files from their computers using their mobile devices, who was interviewed by the New York Times, individuals can also protect themselves by using a VPN (virtual private network) on their device, which will encrypt their traffic and block emails from being intercepted.

Detect
Knowing what to look for is the first step. According to the NCSA, businesses should pay attention to any unusual requests, especially though email, that direct them to click unknown links or open suspect attachments. Brokerages can reduce the chance of fraud by implementing office-wide training sessions that teach agents how to detect scams, proceed safely and safeguard their information.

Respond
If an individual suspects fraud, what is the appropriate course of action? The NCSA recommends that they disconnect any computers that may have been compromised and bring in an IT team to take a look. Additionally, if widespread and severe enough, they should also contact law enforcement and retain legal counsel.

Due to the nature of real estate, in which brokerages can have hundreds of agents across multiple offices, any individuals who suspect fraud should immediately notify their broker so they can ensure the breach is not extensive.

Scams to Look Out For
According to the New York Times, the FBI has reported 3,766 instances of real estate scams between October 2014 and October 2019, with losses reaching nearly $339 million.

The best way to protect data? Know what the scams are. In 2019, several REALTORS® reported receiving texts and phone calls from 800-874-6500—the toll-free number for the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR). However, NAR reported it was not making these calls and they were fraudulent.

Scams happen often on the consumer side, as well. REALTORS® should educate their clients about the most common types of fraud they may encounter, which can include:

  • Wire transfer requests via email – All requests should be confirmed by the agent or attorney, in person or by phone.
  • Illegitimate rental or for-sale listings for which the “landlord” or “seller” requests payment upfront, such as a security deposit or down payment. These fraudsters often claim to require these deposits in advance and then disappear with the money.
  • Emails asking for sensitive information – Consumers should look for warning signs such as grammar and spelling errors, suspicious email addresses and phone numbers or addresses in their signature that cannot be verified.

Several organizations are taking the lead on fraud prevention in real estate. For example, Title Resource Group (TRG) recently launched a campaign, in the form of a game, to help educate agents and consumers about fraud.

NAR provides a Data Security and Privacy Toolkit to help educate industry professionals about how to protect their data and comply with legal requirements. The toolkit includes state law information and any pending federal regulations on the subject of data security, as well as checklists for implementing a data security program.

Brokers and agents, share your experiences with us and let us know what you are doing to protect your data.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s senior editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com.

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Big Microsoft data breach – 250 million records exposed – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Microsoft has today announced a data breach that affected one of its customer databases.

The blog article, entitled Access Misconfiguration for Customer Support Databases, admits that between 05 December 2019 and 31 December 2019, a database used for “support case analytics” was effectively visible from the cloud to the world.

Microsoft didn’t give details of how big the database was. However, consumer website Comparitech, which says it discovered the unsecured data online, claims it was to the order of 250 million records containing:

…logs of conversations between Microsoft support agents and customers from all over the world, spanning a 14-year period from 2005 to December 2019.

According to Comparitech, that same data was accessible on five Elasticsearch servers.

The company informed Microsoft, and Microsoft quickly secured the data.

Microsoft’s official statement states that “the vast majority of records were cleared of personal information,” meaning that it used automated tools to look for and remove private data.

However, some private data that was supposed to be redacted was missed and remained visible in the exposed information.

Microsoft didn’t say what type of personal information was involved, or which data fields ended up un-anonymised.

It did, however, give one example of data that would have been left behind: email addresses with spaces added by mistake were not recognised as personal data and therefore escaped anonymisation.

So if your email address were recorded as “name@example.com” your data would have been converted into a harmless form, whereas “name[space]@example.com” (an easy mistake for a support staffer to make when capturing data) would have been left alone.

Microsoft has promised to notify anyone whose data was inadvertently exposed in this way, but didn’t say what percentage of all records were affected.

What to do?

We don’t know how many people were affected or exactly what personal data was opened up for those users.

We also don’t know who else, besides Comparitech, may have noticed in the three weeks it was exposed, although Microsoft says that it “found no malicious use”.

We assume that if you don’t hear from Microsoft, even if you did contact support during the 2005 to 2019 period, then either your data wasn’t in the exposed database, or there wasn’t actually enough in the leaked database to allow anyone, including Microsoft itself, to identify you.

It’s nevertheless possible that crooks will contact you claiming that you *were* in the breach.

They might urge you to take steps to “fix” the problem, such as clicking on a link and logging in “for security reasons”, or to “confirm your account”, or on some other pretext.

Remember: if ever you receive a security alert email, whether you think it is legitimate or not, avoid clicking on any links, calling any numbers or taking any online actions demanded in the email.

Find your own way to the site where you would usually log in, and stay one step ahead of phishing emails!

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Data Awareness Is Key to Data Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Traditional data-leak prevention is not enough for businesses facing today’s dynamic threat landscape.

Data attacks reached an all-time high in 2019 as we continued to transform our lives digitally — moving our work, health, financial, and social information online. In response, businesses must meet hefty data and information protection regulatory and compliance requirements. There’s no room for error. Protections are required for everything from simple user mistakes, such as downloading a file on the corporate network and sending it to a personal account, to malicious insider behavior and nation-state attacks. This task and associated fines are daunting.

Governments worldwide are also addressing these challenges by mandating new data protection regulations and privacy acts, including the Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Regulations are introducing stricter information protection standards and unprecedented fines companies must plan for and comply with — up to 4% of their annual revenue — for handling business and customer data.

To keep up with these regulations and the global demand for security and privacy, compliance and data risk officer roles are increasing. They create policies and implement tools to track how data is collected, used, managed and stored across its life cycle so businesses remain compliant and earn customers’ trust.

Security and Compliance Are Two Different Worlds
Even with heightened focus on reducing risk, security and compliance teams have different backgrounds and responsibilities, and historically they have not worked together, which means they don’t always understand the other’s business needs.

When it comes to information protection and compliance, most companies focus on thwarting data leaks by locking down data within their perimeter, which can be a device, file server, or network boundary. Data leakage prevention (DLP) identifies sensitive content and defines policies to prevent data egress across the network, devices, and applications.

In parallel, companies’ security teams operate disconnected threat protection solutions — EPP, EDR, SEG, CASB, UEBA, NTA, etc. — designed to prevent, detect, and respond to attacks on companies’ intellectual property. But often these tools — separate from the information protection and DLP tools — don’t know where this intellectual property and sensitive content resides.

Most data protection solutions focus on prevention and ignore a key aspect of risk management and compliance: attackers’ access to sensitive data, which can reside on devices, applications, and/or in the cloud. Threat protection solutions, by contrast, identify attackers in the network but ignore the key aspect of security incidents: the sensitivity of data accessed during an attack.

So, how should we as an industry eliminate the walls between them to deliver a higher level of protection?

Create a Better Security Posture
Unifying security and compliance under a new model of data-aware threat protection will enable businesses to create trust while reducing risk to users and data. By integrating and sharing signals between the DLP and threat protection solutions, companies can determine the business context and impact of each security incident, and the actual risk to each piece of sensitive data. Security teams and data officers can then work in tandem, instead of in silos, to respond to and address incidents faster and more reliably.

This new data-aware threat-protection model has four key advantages:

Risk-based incident prioritization: Security operators typically prioritize incident response based on severity, but that neglects the overall business impact. Data classification awareness by threat protection solutions contributes to how alerts, incidents, and vulnerabilities are prioritized. It helps better determine the risk of the activity, which influences its prioritization. An alert on a corporate device that stores sensitive data is more important than an alert on a device that doesn’t. Even if the security threat on its own is lower, sensitive data in a compromised environment is a reason to act — fast.

More precise threat hunting: By tracing each attacker action and intertwining it with data classification context, analysts can better understand attackers’ motivations and searches. This also arms hunters with the ability to reference data severity. For example, analysts can create a hunting query to address a request like, “Get all PowerShell processes that accessed a sensitive Word doc.” Such context also enables better hunting for data exfiltration threats by understanding whether activity is malicious or benign. For example, reading a file, copying a file to another folder, or taking a screen capture are legitimate actions most times. However, sensitive data is different. Reading such a file may indicate anomalous access to sensitive data, copying a file may be part of staging for exfiltration, and screen capturing may be a way to steal sensitive data.

Automatic remediation across security and compliance boundaries: Automation allows often understaffed security and compliance teams to do more and react more quickly. But missing the incident’s context makes all response playbooks the same. Data classification awareness allows defenders to become more effective by defining customized response actions based on data sensitivity. For example, automatically locking access to sensitive data on at-risk devices until the risk is mitigated or blocking a process performing anomalous access from accessing sensitive files until it’s determined whether the activity is benign or malicious.

More effective security posture management: Security and compliance teams should not just respond to data leaks or data exfiltration incidents after they occur; they should think about being proactive to reduce leaks. Visibility is key. Do you know where your sensitive data is, where it’s stored? Knowing that and combining the compliance (data sensitivity) and security (risk) disciplines enable us to proactively reduce the chance and impact of data breaches. For example, you can prioritize patching devices with sensitive documents, or force two-factor authentication to access sensitive document folders.

Old-school data leakage prevention is not enough for businesses facing a dynamic threat landscape. Adversaries are sophisticated, and no matter how high the wall, they will find a way around. Then, it’s game over. Trust is lost. The industry should recognize that data-aware threat protection is essential to proactively protecting customers’ data and establishing trust and consistency across privacy and security.

Related Content:

Moti Gindi is the Corporate Vice President for Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP). In his role, he manages an engineering team that is responsible for Microsoft’s endpoint security, specifically Microsoft Defender ATP (recently recognized as a leader in … View Full Bio

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#cybersecurity | #infosec | WeLeakInfo, the site which sold access to passwords stolen in data breaches, is brought down by the FBI

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

FBI seizes control of WeLeakInfo.com which sold passwords stolen in data breaches

Law enforcement agencies have seized control of the domain of WeLeakInfo, a website offering cheap access to billions of personal credentials stolen from approximately 10,000 data breaches.

For as little as $2 per day, anyone could search the controversial website’s database of records and in many instances extract names, email addresses, phone numbers, and passwords. These passwords could then be used by unscrupulous hackers to break into other accounts where users had made the mistake of reusing the same credentials.

Weleakinfo

With the seizure of the WeLeakInfo.com domain, the website’s operations are effectively suspended.

Visitors to the WeLeakInfo.com website are now greeted by a message from the various law enforcement agencies who have been investigating the website’s activities.

Seized website

A 22-year-old man was arrested by police on Wednesday in Fintona, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, in connection with the website, and another 22-year-old male has been arrested by East Netherland Cyber Crime Unit (Politie) in Arnhem.

According to an NCA press release, the two individuals are suspected by police of having made profits in excess of £200,000 from the site.

Prosecutors are likely to argue that those behind the website were profiting from the unlawful sale of stolen data, and assisting third-parties in also accessing sensitive details.

It’s important to recognise that there is a clear difference between the likes of WeLeakInfo and legitimate services like Troy Hunt’s HaveIBeenPwned.

WeLeakInfo allowed anyone to scoop up the passwords of those involved in a data breach, meaning they could be used in future security breaches.

HaveIBeenPwned, on the other hand, doesn’t store or share anybody’s password – instead the service, which I heartily recommend individuals and organisations sign up for, informs you if your email address has been included in a data breach. And that’s it. The onus is then on you to take steps to protect yourself (which may mean resetting passwords, and ensuring that you are not using the password you use on the hacked website anywhere else).

Authorities say they continue to investigate WeLeakInfo, and one can’t help but wonder if there will be more arrests if the site’s customer details are extracted from the seized infrastructure.

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#deepweb | Microsoft Access can change the way you work with data. Master it for $30

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

TLDR: The Ultimate Microsoft Access Mastery Bundle collects the best training in the world’s top database management tool for only $29.99.

What’s the most popular Microsoft Office app? While it’s tough to make that call with certainty, it’s hard to imagine Microsoft Word doesn’t lead that pack. Ask for other Office features that get lots of use and you’ll likely hear plenty of votes cast for Excel, Outlook, or PowerPoint. 

One app you don’t hear cited nearly as often is Microsoft Access. But in an age where data is king, you may be shocked at the everyday utility of the industry-leading information management tool.

The Ultimate Microsoft Access Mastery Bundle ($29.99, over 90 percent off from TNW Deals) can help open your eyes to the power of databases and what they can mean to your daily workflow as well as your professional future.

With 224 lectures covering over 50 hours of training, this bundle pulls together all the best recent Access 2019, 2016 and 2013 training, offering up a fully-rounded view of how to get the most out of this sneaky,  powerful software.

Filled with exercises and testing, this training delves into everything you need to know, from creating and maintaining Access databases; to using Access tables, relationships and keys; to task automation and customization; to producing advanced reports that dig deep into your data.

Regularly $594, this coursework can turn you an advanced Access user for just $29.99.

Software not included. Prices are subject to change.

You can’t beat free! Get $70+ worth of premium Mac apps for free today!

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Malicious npm package exfiltrating data from UNIX systems

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A
malicious JavaScript package was uploaded Dec. 30 2019 on the Node Package
Manager (npm), the world’s largest software registry, containing over 800,000
code packages that developers use to write JavaScript applications.

The
package, identified as 1337qq-js, was
spotted stealing sensitive data through install scrips of Unix Systems. It
marks the sixth-known incident to strike the npm repository in the past three
years.

According
to the analysis by the npm team, only Unix Systems are targeted, and the data
it collects includes running processes, environment variables, uname
–a, npmrc file and /etc/hosts.

So
how can this malicious package affect its users? Well, some sensitive
information such as hard-coded passwords and API access tokens are sometimes
stored as environment variables in JavaScript web or mobile apps.

In recent
years, similar security breaches have made it on the npm repository index. Most
notably, in April 2017, npm was hit with the upload of 38 malicious 
libraries configured to steal environment details from projects
that used them.

Luckily,
the malicious package was successfully removed from the npm website after a
two-week shelf life.

The
npm repository for 
1337qq-js now
reads: “This package name is not currently in use, but was formerly occupied by
another package. To avoid malicious use, npm is hanging on to the package name,
but loosely, and we’ll probably give it to you if you want it.”

As
a security measure, developers who downloaded or used the malicious JavaScript
package are urged to remove it from their systems and reset any compromised
passwords or credentials.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from HOTforSecurity authored by Alina Bizga. Read the original post at: https://hotforsecurity.bitdefender.com/blog/malicious-npm-package-exfiltrating-data-from-unix-systems-22041.html

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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | DFARS / CMMC for 2020: Culmination of Efforts to Protect National Security Data and Networks – Cybersecurity and Privacy Alert | Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Updated: May 25, 2018:

JD Supra is a legal publishing service that connects experts and their content with broader audiences of professionals, journalists and associations.

This Privacy Policy describes how JD Supra, LLC (“JD Supra” or “we,”https://www.jdsupra.com/”us,” or “our“) collects, uses and shares personal data collected from visitors to our website (located at www.jdsupra.com) (our “Website“) who view only publicly-available content as well as subscribers to our services (such as our email digests or author tools)(our “Services“). By using our Website and registering for one of our Services, you are agreeing to the terms of this Privacy Policy.

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Privacy Officer

JD Supra, LLC

10 Liberty Ship Way, Suite 300

Sausalito, California 94965

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You can make a request for this information by emailing us at privacy@jdsupra.com or by writing to us at:


Privacy Officer

JD Supra, LLC

10 Liberty Ship Way, Suite 300

Sausalito, California 94965

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We use cookies and other tracking technologies to:

  1. Improve the user experience on our Website and Services;
  2. Store the authorization token that users receive when they login to the private areas of our Website. This token is specific to a user’s login session and requires a valid username and password to obtain. It is required to access the user’s profile information, subscriptions, and analytics;
  3. Track anonymous site usage; and
  4. Permit connectivity with social media networks to permit content sharing.

There are different types of cookies and other technologies used our Website, notably:

  • Session cookies” – These cookies only last as long as your online session, and disappear from your computer or device when you close your browser (like Internet Explorer, Google Chrome or Safari).
  • Persistent cookies” – These cookies stay on your computer or device after your browser has been closed and last for a time specified in the cookie. We use persistent cookies when we need to know who you are for more than one browsing session. For example, we use them to remember your preferences for the next time you visit.
  • Web Beacons/Pixels” – Some of our web pages and emails may also contain small electronic images known as web beacons, clear GIFs or single-pixel GIFs. These images are placed on a web page or email and typically work in conjunction with cookies to collect data. We use these images to identify our users and user behavior, such as counting the number of users who have visited a web page or acted upon one of our email digests.

JD Supra Cookies. We place our own cookies on your computer to track certain information about you while you are using our Website and Services. For example, we place a session cookie on your computer each time you visit our Website. We use these cookies to allow you to log-in to your subscriber account. In addition, through these cookies we are able to collect information about how you use the Website, including what browser you may be using, your IP address, and the URL address you came from upon visiting our Website and the URL you next visit (even if those URLs are not on our Website). We also utilize email web beacons to monitor whether our emails are being delivered and read. We also use these tools to help deliver reader analytics to our authors to give them insight into their readership and help them to improve their content, so that it is most useful for our users.

Analytics/Performance Cookies. JD Supra also uses the following analytic tools to help us analyze the performance of our Website and Services as well as how visitors use our Website and Services:

  • HubSpot – For more information about HubSpot cookies, please visit legal.hubspot.com/privacy-policy.
  • New Relic – For more information on New Relic cookies, please visit www.newrelic.com/privacy.
  • Google Analytics – For more information on Google Analytics cookies, visit www.google.com/policies. To opt-out of being tracked by Google Analytics across all websites visit http://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout. This will allow you to download and install a Google Analytics cookie-free web browser.

Facebook, Twitter and other Social Network Cookies. Our content pages allow you to share content appearing on our Website and Services to your social media accounts through the “Like,”https://www.jdsupra.com/”Tweet,” or similar buttons displayed on such pages. To accomplish this Service, we embed code that such third party social networks provide and that we do not control. These buttons know that you are logged in to your social network account and therefore such social networks could also know that you are viewing the JD Supra Website.

Controlling and Deleting Cookies

If you would like to change how a browser uses cookies, including blocking or deleting cookies from the JD Supra Website and Services you can do so by changing the settings in your web browser. To control cookies, most browsers allow you to either accept or reject all cookies, only accept certain types of cookies, or prompt you every time a site wishes to save a cookie. It’s also easy to delete cookies that are already saved on your device by a browser.

The processes for controlling and deleting cookies vary depending on which browser you use. To find out how to do so with a particular browser, you can use your browser’s “Help” function or alternatively, you can visit http://www.aboutcookies.org which explains, step-by-step, how to control and delete cookies in most browsers.

Updates to This Policy

We may update this cookie policy and our Privacy Policy from time-to-time, particularly as technology changes. You can always check this page for the latest version. We may also notify you of changes to our privacy policy by email.

Contacting JD Supra

If you have any questions about how we use cookies and other tracking technologies, please contact us at: privacy@jdsupra.com.

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The post #nationalcybersecuritymonth | DFARS / CMMC for 2020: Culmination of Efforts to Protect National Security Data and Networks – Cybersecurity and Privacy Alert | Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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