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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Signal Sciences Introduces Advanced Rate Limiting for Fast, Easy Protection Against Advanced Web Attacks

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Signal Sciences is excited to announce the availability of new advanced rate limiting features that extend our customers’ ability to detect and stop abusive behavior at the application and API layer.

Over the past several weeks as part of our early access program, we piloted advanced rate limiting in real-world production environments and stopped major attacks for customers from major retailers with large-scale e-commerce operations, financial services firms with mission-critical applications to major online media companies that stream video content to hundreds of millions of users monthly.

The Value of Intelligent Rate Limiting to Protect Applications

The primary objective of rate limiting is to prevent apps, APIs and infrastructure from being exploited by abusive request traffic, much of it originating from automated bot operators. Stopping this traffic from reaching your app and API endpoints means availability, reliability and a satisfying customer experience.

Up to this point, customers have used the Advanced Rules capability of our next-gen WAF to monitor and block web request traffic that attempts to carry out application denial-of-service attacks, brute-force credential stuffing, content scraping or API misuse.

Advanced rate limiting from Signal Sciences stops abusive malicious and anomalous high volume web and API requests and reduces web server and API utilization while allowing legitimate traffic through to your applications and APIs.

With our new advanced rate limiting capability, Signal Sciences customers can leverage the ease of use, effective defense and precise blocking they’ve come to expect from our next-gen WAF and RASP solution. In addition to out-of-the-box protection, they also gain immediate insight and understanding of the traffic origins and can take granular custom actions by:

  • Creating application-specific rules to prevent app and API abuse
  • Defining custom conditions to block abusive requests
  • Identifying and responding to a real-time list of IPs that have been rate limited
  • Taking action on the identified source IP addresses with one click

How Signal Sciences Advanced Rate Limiting Works

Leveraging our award-winning app and API web protection technology, advanced rate limiting provides intelligent controls to reduce the number of requests directed at key web application functions such as credit card validation forms, forgot password fields, email subscription sign-ups, gift card balance checkers and more.

Signal Sciences makes it easy to create application-specific rate limiting rules. One-click actions enable further control over automated volumetric web requests.

Our technical approach for this new capability was informed by the expertise our company has gained from protecting over a trillion web requests monthly. This experience shows us that web requests that result in application abuse can blend in with legitimate traffic. Signal Sciences advanced rate limiting is designed to identify such traffic and prevent individual IPs from causing app abuse.

Take the next step and effectively stop and manage abusive traffic

We invite you to learn about other common attack scenarios that customers use advanced rate limiting to thwart and how easy it makes stopping and managing the attack origin traffic: download the rate limiting data sheet or request a demo today.

The post Signal Sciences Introduces Advanced Rate Limiting for Fast, Easy Protection Against Advanced Web Attacks appeared first on Signal Sciences.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Signal Sciences authored by Brendon Macaraeg. Read the original post at: https://www.signalsciences.com/blog/signal-sciences-introduces-advanced-rate-limiting-protection-against-advanced-web-attacks/

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The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Signal Sciences Introduces Advanced Rate Limiting for Fast, Easy Protection Against Advanced Web Attacks <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#deepweb | Raphael Varane Brace Leads Real Madrid to Easy 3-0 Win vs. Getafe | Bleacher Report

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Quality Sport Images/Getty Images Raphael Varane scored twice as Real Madrid beat Getafe 3-0 in their first La Liga match of 2020 on Saturday at the Coliseum Alfonso Perez. Los Blancos took the lead on 34 minutes after goalkeeper David Soria failed to punch Ferland Mendy’s cross clear, […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | 4 easy cybersecurity rules for technophobes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Having your data exposed in a breach feels inevitable, so securing your information online is a must. But with terms like VPN, SSO and HTTPS being bandied about, it’s hard to know where to start. It’s true, there are many, many steps you could take to improve […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #infosec | About the “easy to hack” EU Exit: ID Document Check app

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

About the "easy to hack" EU Exit: ID Document Check app

Today the Financial Times has published a news story about how the British Home Office’s app for EU citizens applying to live and work in the UK post-Brexit “could allow hackers to steal phone numbers, addresses and passport details.”

It certainly caught my attention. Just yesterday I used the EU Exit: ID Document Check app on my cleaning lady’s Android phone to help her apply for residency. And – to be honest – it was pretty easy to use, once I’d worked out how to change the language of her phone from Romanian to English.

Applicants scan their passport, take a selfie, and use their phone’s NFC feature to read the biometric chip embedded in their passport.

But, according to the FT, Norwegian cybersecurity researchers have discovered flaws in the Android version of the app (they didn’t test the iPhone version):

Promon, a Norwegian cybersecurity company, found major loopholes that allowed them to take control of the app and access any information that was entered into it, including the facial scans and images of passport pages.

They were also able to see information being typed into the app, such as usernames, passwords and other details, and were able to alter information being entered.

“The tools we used are typically very easily accessible and require very little technical skill to use. It means any type of bad actor could perform this attack, without sophisticated technical knowledge,” said Tom Lysemose Hansen, chief technology officer at Promon, who added that they had “experienced no resistance”.

Ok… so it sounds scary that information could be surreptitiously stolen as it is entered into the app… but how would a hacker do this?

Mr Lysemose Hansen said Promon’s researchers had focused on copying and stealing or manipulating data while it was being actively entered into, or processed by, the app. But he added that it was possible to add malicious code to the app while it was inactive that would then help steal personal information when it was subsequently being used.

Oh.

So what the researchers are saying is that if a hacker manages to compromise your smartphone or the app then it could do something malicious…

Err, isn’t that pretty much the case with all programs and computers? If a hacker already has control of the device or has already compromised the app then all bets are off…

Now, if the researchers had described a way in which an attacker might be able to remotely compromise the app or meddle with the phone then that would have been interesting. Or if it had been found that the app was sending sensitive data insecurely which could be intercepted then that would have certainly raised an eyebrow.

And yes, an app could always integrity check itself to see if it had been tampered with, but if someone is replacing your legitimate version of the app with a bogus compromised version there’s no reason why they couldn’t also tamper with the code which checks if it has been tampered with!

So, this doesn’t seem like a big deal to me.

The final word goes to the Financial Times again:

The app was tested for several months before being launched in March and there have been no reports of any security breaches. The app’s page on the Google Play Store states that it is “safe and secure” and that: “None of your personal identity information will be stored in the app or on the phone when you finish using it.”

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The post #cybersecurity | #infosec | About the “easy to hack” EU Exit: ID Document Check app appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#deepweb | N.J. towns are easy targets for dark web hackers. They won’t always admit being scammed.

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The ransom demand was electronic.

In 2017, Newark’s computer system was hijacked by a group of hackers from halfway across the world, shutting down municipal services. Officials were given just seven days to come up with $30,000 in Bitcoin or they could kiss the city’s encrypted computer files goodbye.

They paid the ransom.

Cybercrime continues to explode nationwide, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s most recent internet crime report. Last year, federal authorities received more than 350,000 complaints involving internet-based fraud, an increase of 16.7 percent over the previous year. Victim losses across the country in 2018 related to cybercrime totaled $2.71 billion.

In New Jersey, more than 8,400 victims across the state — including businesses, individuals, and government agencies — reported overall cybercrime losses last year of $79.7 million, making the state ninth in the nation for such high-tech theft, the FBI reported.

While much of that involved scams against individuals, businesses and Fortune 500 companies, the masters of the dark web have also been targeting your local tax collector’s office. Dozens of municipal government agencies in New Jersey have been victimized by hackers over the past two years, but have been reluctant to make those attacks public, officials say.

John Cohen, a senior expert on global threats for the Argonne National Laboratory and a professor at the Georgetown University Security Studies Program, said local governments remain easy targets for cyber criminals.

“Their systems remain vulnerable due insufficient security and local governments continue to pay the criminals,” Cohen said. “Until localities change their practices in the regard, they will continue to be targeted.”

In New Jersey, the state’s Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness said it has been tracking the threat of ransomware since 2015 and officials said municipal governments have long been in the mix.

“Many cyber-threat actors are just looking for low-risk targets and something they can monetize,” said Jared Maples, who heads the state agency. “The availability of hacking tools and the increasing number of unsecured internet-connected devices reduces the need for extensive technical skills to carry out successful cyberattacks.”

Officials at the Municipal Excess Liability Joint Insurance Fund, which helps insure public entities across the state, said they have seen a 540% increase in cyber attacks on local government agencies since 2013. About 80 events have been reported over that time, but officials with the fund said they were aware of 50 others that were never formally reported.

“Nobody wants to acknowledge they’ve been victimized,” said Marc Pfeiffer, assistant director of the Bloustein Local Government Research Center at Rutgers University, of the radio silence. Nobody is going to call a press conference to announce someone made off with taxpayer funds, he said.

Maples, meanwhile, believes that what is happening is only going to get worse.

“Cyberspace is a complex, diverse, and fluid security environment with real, persistent, and evolving threats,” he said. “The impacts of cyberattacks will increase as we enter into an era of autonomous systems, artificial intelligence, smart cities, hyper-connectivity, and the convergence of cyber-physical systems and devices.”

MORPHING SCHEMES

While many of the high profile cybercrime cases that have come to light in recent years have involved ransomware, where malicious software delivered by a link that should never have been clicked is used to corrupt and encrypt computer files, that is only one of many weapons commonly employed. According to the FBI, the attack tactic most gaining favor these days is known as Business Email Compromise, or BEC, which targets those who use wire transfers.

The BEC scam works by compromising the email of corporate executives — and sometimes of municipal officials involved in finance — and seeks to redirect wire transfers meant for suppliers or financial institutions to fraudulent accounts both here and abroad.

Earlier this year, Lawrence Espaillat, 41, of Clifton pleaded guilty in connection with a BEC scheme to steal more than $1 million from corporate victims and individuals. Authorities said Espaillat and others incorporated sham businesses and created email addresses, which mimicked but differed slightly from legitimate email addresses of supervisory employees at various companies. Emails from those sham accounts were then used to send what appeared to be requests for payment of legitimate invoices or debts owed by the victims.

Last year in New Jersey, according to state municipal finance officials, at least one unnamed municipality was sent wiring instructions by such a compromised email to change its bond anticipation note payments from what appeared to be one reputable banking institution to another. They sent $40,000 to the other account, which was fraudulent.

In August 2018, the FBI said received a complaint filed on behalf of another New Jersey town that fell victim of another BEC scam, transferring more than $1 million into the fraudulent account. Michael Doyle, an FBI supervisory special agent in New Jersey, would not identify the town, but said the money was recovered through a “financial fraud kill chain” that moves to quickly freeze funds and recall a wire transfer if they are alerted without delay.

Noting the explosion in BEC complaints nationally, Doyle said the nature of cybercrime is changing. More than $1.2 billion in losses were attributed last year to just on compromised business email scams.

“It dwarfs everything else,” the FBI agent said — far more than the $362 million lost to victims in confidence or romance fraud.

Yet while ransomware complaints do not top the list of cybercrime complaints, Doyle suspects what happened in Newark may be happening more than is being reported to authorities. How the money is taken has also morphed, he added, with the use of “money mules” in the United States who act — sometimes unwittingly — as a go-between, so that suspicions are not raised by having money directly wired overseas.

“It used to be jumping out of the country immediately,” Doyle said. Now, potential victims might think it suspicious to be told to send money to an account in Hong Kong. These days, money may be wired through a series of destination points before in lands in somebody’s pocket.

Last November, two Iranian men were indicted in connection with an international wave of ransomware attacks that shut down Newark’s computer systems, and led to the city’s payment of $30,000 to regain control of the city’s electronic files. Faramarz Shahi Savandi and Mohammad Mehdi Shah Mansouri where charged with running what officials called “an extreme form of 21st century digital blackmail.”

Both men remain at large.

Doyle said cybercrime is still far more likely to target big companies than town hall. Usually municipalities don’t have that kind of money. There’s no revenue stream.

Still, the problem for local government is growing, officials here say.

David N. Grubb, executive director of the Municipal Excess Liability Joint Insurance Fund in Parsippany, said the impact is not insignificant.

“When a municipality gets hit by one of these things, can’t quantify the disruption that occurs. There are things that can’t happen when you are trying to get the system up and running. There is a reputational cost,” he said. It can get residents quite upset.“

A spokeswoman for Newark said the city has made numerous changes and improvements to defend against similar attacks, including improvements to infrastructure, training as well as following professional recommendations that identified security gaps.

“While no amount of preparation protects any organization 100%, the city is in a much better position to thwart similar events,” said the spokeswoman, Crystal Rosa.

At the same time, she said the city is constantly being being targeted.

“Measures put in place, actions following the prior ransomware event, have identified attempts and been successful to date from any in-depth intrusion,” she said.

With three dozen or more New Jersey municipalities the victims of successful hacker attacks in just the last two years, Pfeiffer said local officials are paying more attention, and like Newark, said that the electronic systems of every municipality in the state are under attack daily. Most municipalities now have cyber insurance, he added.

But technology requires management, and that requires time and money.

“There are two things you cannot be without in managing technology,” he said. “You have to have somebody you trust advising you on technology. And you have to have a sound backup plan.”

Ted Sherman may be reached at tsherman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TedShermanSL. Facebook: @TedSherman.reporter. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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The post #deepweb | <p> N.J. towns are easy targets for dark web hackers. They won’t always admit being scammed. <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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It’s #apparently #insanely easy to #hack #Apple #MacOS High #Sierra, and here’s how you can #protect yourself

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Most of us sleep better at night knowing that the data on our computers is safe from prying eyes. That’s why we have our trusty usernames and passwords. Well, turns out…not so much. Some tech-minded people found a super easy way to hack Apple MacOS High Sierra, and anyone can do it.

Usually, when you hear “hack” you think of some crazy complicated computing code that only the really dedicated can figure out, like Huck on Scandal or something. But to get into a computer that has the High Sierra operating system, all you have to do is type “root” as the username and leave the password field blank. Once you hit enter, you’re in.

We told you it was insanely easy.

The main user of a computer is called the “root user” and has “root access,” hence the name of the bug. The best way to protect yourself for now, according to Apple, is by setting a password for your main user account if you don’t already have one. Security experts and researchers have had varying experiences in replicating the bug, so it’s still being figured out. According to Wired, Apple is aware of the issue and working out a long- term fix, so hold tight for their update if you’re worried about your security.

Oh, and to make this even scarier, apparently the software can be hacked via malware too, meaning a hacker can get into your computer remotely.

So make sure you set your admin password and keep your eye out for anything out of the ordinary on your Mac or MacBook if you have Sierra. Hopefully, Apple will fix the bug ASAP.

The post It’s #apparently #insanely easy to #hack #Apple #MacOS High #Sierra, and here’s how you can #protect yourself appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Could voting fraud panel create an easy target for hackers?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Officials from both parties had a consistent answer last year when asked about the security of voting systems: U.S. elections are so decentralized that it would be impossible for hackers to manipulate ballot counts or voter rolls on a wide scale. But the voter fraud commission established by President Donald…

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As I’ve told Tyler, there’s not a really easy place between being single and being married for………..

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ As I’ve told Tyler, there’s not a really easy place between being single and being married for us now. We’re just so busy that the logistics of our career make dating impossible. I think I’ll find…

The post As I’ve told Tyler, there’s not a really easy place between being single and being married for……….. appeared first on Become007.com.

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Software developers are easy targets for hackers study finds

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Netsparker Ltd., a company in the web applications security industry, has released survey results showing that most software developers make themselves easy targets for hackers, even when they are behind a corporate firewall. The primary reason is not that their web server software is out of date, however. Instead, it…

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It’s Possible (and Fairly Easy) to Hack a PC With a Vape Pen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

It’s Possible (and Fairly Easy) to Hack a PC With a Vape Pen

E-cigarette smokers consider yourself warned: that vape pen you love to puff on could expose your computer to malware. According to a report from Sky News, security researcher Ross Bevington recently demonstrated how to hack a PC with a vape pen during a presentation at BSides London. Bevington showed how…

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