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#deepweb | 4th Global Report on Adult Learning and Education: Leave No One Behind: Participation, Equity and Inclusion – World

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

UNESCO report shows fewer than 5% of people in many countries benefit from adult learning opportunities

Paris, 04 December—In almost one-third of countries, fewer than five per cent of adults aged 15 and above participate in education and learning programmes, according to UNESCO’s fourth Global Report on Adult Learning and Education (GRALE 4). Adults with disabilities, older adults, refugees and migrants, minority groups and other disadvantaged segments of society are particularly under-represented in adult education programmes and find themselves deprived of crucial access to lifelong learning opportunities.

Published by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning, the report monitors the extent to which UNESCO Member States put their international commitments regarding adult learning and education into practice and reflects data submitted by 159 countries. It calls for a major change in the approach to adult learning and education (ALE) backed by adequate investment to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to access and benefit from adult learning and education and that its full contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is realized.

“We urge governments and the international community to join our efforts and take action to ensure that no one – no matter who they are, where they live or what challenges they face – is left behind where the universal right to education is concerned,” says UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay, endorsing the report’s recommendations. “By ensuring that donor countries respect their aid obligations to developing countries, we can make adult learning and education a key lever in empowering and enabling adults, as learners, workers, parents, and active citizens.”

The publication stresses the need to increase national investment in ALE, reduce participation costs, raise awareness of benefits, and improve data collection and monitoring, particularly for disadvantaged groups.

Progress in participation in adult learning and education is insufficient

Despite low participation overall, many more than half of responding countries (57% of 152) reported an increase in the overall participation rate in adult learning and education between 2015 and 2018. Low-income countries reported the largest increase in ALE participation (73%), trailed by lower middle income and upper middle income countries (61% and 62%).

Most increases in adult learning and education participation were in sub-Saharan Africa (72% of respondents), followed by the Arab region (67%), Latin America and the Caribbean (60%) and Asia and the Pacific (49%). North America and Western Europe reported fewest increases (38%) though starting from higher levels.

The data shows persistent and deep inequalities in participation and that key target groups such as adults with disabilities, older adults, minority groups as well as adults living in conflict-affected countries are not being reached.

Women’s participation must improve further

While the global report shows that women’s participation in ALE has increased in 59 per cent of the reporting countries since 2015, in some parts of the world, girls and women still do not have sufficient access to education, notably to vocational training, leaving them with few skills and poor chances of finding employment and contributing to the societies they live in, which also represents an economic loss for their countries.

Quality is improving but not fast enough

Quality ALE can also provide invaluable support to sustainable development and GRALE 4 shows that three-quarters of countries reported progress in the quality of education since 2015. Qualitative progress is observed in curricula, assessment, teaching methods and employment conditions of adult educators. However, progress in citizenship education, which is essential in promoting and protecting freedom, equality, democracy, human rights, tolerance and solidarity, remained negligible. No more than 3% of countries reported qualitative progress in this area.

Increase in funding for adult learning and education needed

GRALE 4 shows that over the last ten years, spending on adult learning and education has not reached sufficient levels, not only in low-income countries but also in lower middle income and high-income countries. Nearly 20% of Member States reported spending less than 0.5 per cent of their education budgets on ALE and a further 14% reported spending less than 1 per cent. This information demonstrates that many countries have failed to implement the intended increase in ALE financing proposed in GRALE 3 and that ALE remains underfunded. Moreover, under-investment hits socially disadvantaged adults the hardest. Lack of funding also hampers the implementation of new policies and efficient governance practices.

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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | SPC Named Center of Excellence in Cyber Defense Education

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

St. Petersburg College was recognized this month by The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

  • SPC named Center of Excellence in cybersecurity education
  • Designated through academic year 2024
  • Allows school to further expand program
  • More Pinellas County stories

The school was named a National Center of Excellence in Cyber Defense Education. The recognition comes as October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month. 

Dr. James Stewart, Dean of the College of Computers and Information Technology at SPC, says the designation is an honor and will help the school expand its cybersecurity program. 

“We want to make sure that we’re number one, our students are number one, and that’s our goal,” said Stewart.

The students at SPC enrolled in the cybersecurity program to get hands-on experience, including learning how to block hackers.

“It’s really interesting to see how they kind of circumvent the common protections we have in place,” said student Lionel Plaisance. “When you’re working in cybersecurity, you have to have a really good idea not just about how one thing works but about how all the pieces come together.”

The dean says the designation will be on students’ diplomas. He also says this recognition will help them expand the program, including adding new classes focused on threat analysis. 

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#deepweb | How Heather Corinna Started the Online Sex Education Revolution – Ms. Magazine

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Information on sexual health permeates the contemporary Internet—from Instagram moguls with a sex ed agenda to crowdsourced Wikipedia entries on gender identities to Netflix original series on the joys and perils of adolescent sexploration. Unfortunately, much of this information is far from comprehensive, and at times unreliable.

But it could be worse: Heather Corinna remembers a time when this wild west of resources was nothing more than a desolate wasteland. That is, before 1998, when they founded pioneering sex education website Scarleteen to answer the questions of tech-savvy and body-curious youths.

Over two decades later, Corinna opened up to Ms. about how much has changed since they pushed through the tumbleweeds of an early Internet—dishing on the origins of their career, their freshly minted graphic novel and the fickle state of sex education.

Tell me a little bit about the original website you hosted that prompted you to start Scarleteen.

Just to backtrack a little bit: starting Scarleteen: It was not something I meant to be a full-time job! [My original website], Scarlet Letters, was meant mostly to focus on women’s experiences with sexuality; it had some smut, some advice, some literary pieces. And because it was one of the few things about sex and sexuality that was on the web at the time, I presume that’s why young people were ending up there, because they were looking for anything on sex and sexuality. So they started to write in.

This was before abstinence-only education and purity pledges, and because it was then and not now, what they were writing in was not particularly complex stuff. Like: “How do I take the birth control pill properly? How do I figure out what I like with my boyfriend?”

My mother was in public health my whole life, my dad was an activist and I’d been a teacher already for a while, so I could answer their questions. The nature of the questions wasn’t very complicated, so putting together Scarleteen I figured I would put up five or 10 pages as a supplement and that would be fine.

Of course, what I wasn’t aware of is that even by that point in the mid-90s a lot of people were not getting sex ed in school or anywhere else. So I put up those pages and it kind of exploded and everybody started writing letters. So, naturally, the questions coming in didn’t necessarily stay so fast and easy. I had to basically stop teaching in person. I had to make a decision to do Scarleteen full time and once it took off it kind of ate my life.

What went into that decision to choose Scarleteen and make that your full-time passion?

Well, it certainly wasn’t the ability to support myself! For me, it was just that I already liked working in sexuality with adults but the need did not feel as compelling. I’m not sure if I would have made the same decision if there had been other sites that appeared to be serving this need. A lot of my nature as a person has to do with service—if somebody needs a thing that I have the ability to provide, then it seems like I should do it. And a lot of the feedback that I was getting when I started doing Scarleteen was young people saying that they had a hard time finding other adults who had [sexual health] information who they could talk to, who wouldn’t shame them, who didn’t have innate problems with sex, who talked to them with respect, who talked to them like they were people who are becoming adults and who weren’t embarrassed.

When you were growing up, did you see anything like a pre-Scarleteen?

I can’t think of anything like [Scarleteen] when I was growing up, but I’d definitely say it has forbearers and parents. I remember as a young person being buried in “Our Bodies, Ourselves”—there’s no way I could do this without that book and all of the little legs of the feminist, self-help health movement in the 70’s.

I think about growing up reading Judy Blume; she wrapped quite a bit of really excellent sex and body information into what she did. I think about “Free to be You and Me;” there’s a lot of stuff about gender equity and fairness in relationships. I think about the initial initiatives to provide information about HIV and AIDS, which were very grassroots and street, because health care providers and the whole government in America was denying what was happening. So I think there are a lot of organic parents of Scarleteen.

How would you say sex educators have changed since you entered the field?

About five years ago, we had an intern start who was 19 and who was talking about how she knew she wanted to be a sex educator since she was 12. It was lovely, because when I was 12, that wasn’t a job! There was no way I would have ever gotten the idea that was a job, whereas someone who’s 12 now, if they’re just watching YouTube, they can see that it’s a job.

I do think that one of the biggest changes is that you have young people, when they are still young people, identifying that this is an area of work that they want to get started in and get involved with. And that’s a massive difference.

If you were to compare the sexual education climate when you started Scarleteen to the climate today, what would you say has changed or stayed the same?

It’s interesting because there’s definitely some things that have gotten worse in the interim and some things that have gotten better. Adults in general are still scared of speaking to their kids about sex and sexuality but you know, the 80’s and 90’s was kind of the hay day for really good sex information. It wasn’t very highly policed and massive conservatism in the United States was kind of at a low. When I first started Scarleteen in ’98, I wasn’t answering questions from people who were in deep, deep shame from having been sexual because you didn’t have all of this “purity” culture.

Then, of course, when the Bush administration came in, and you had billions of dollars going to abstinence-based initiatives—the opposite of sex education. So right now, we’re still at a point where people are fighting to get back good sex ed. But now that fight includes people saying: “Oh, and by the way, we want our sex ed to include queer people, we want it to include trans and gender nonconforming people and we want it to recognize that not everybody is going to get married and have babies.”

What are some of the biggest challenges at Scarleteen?

One of the biggest challenges right now is that I’m the oldest person at Scarleteen by a very serious long shot, but that’s by design. Coming from a generational place that was very, very sex positive and really sexual to a generation that is full of purity culture and has a lot of shame and extra fear is definitely challenging. It’s not the easiest thing for me to relate to. I had a lot of things that I was scared of growing up, but sex was one of the few things that I wasn’t scared of. From a personal perspective, I need to work a little bit harder to connect.

What are some aspects of traditional classroom sex ed that you’ve consciously brought into Scarleteen, versus ones that you’ve consciously ditched?

My teaching background is Montessori and Unschooling, so I’m not a fan of compulsory education. One of the things I like best about Scarleteen is that nobody is forced to be here. So nobody’s suffering through an education that they’re not ready for, that they don’t want or isn’t relevant to them. Having things be opt-in, rather than compulsory is a really big thing for me.

So, we try to make sure that what we’re doing is based on what young people are asking for, whether that ask is super explicit, or whether that ask is based on a trend that we’re noticing. In a lot of any education, what’s being presented is being decided by the educators. One of the things I’ll often hear as a sex educator is, “when I was a teenager, I wanted [to learn] ‘X’”—which would be great if we were going back in time, but generally, that’s not a good basis for figuring out what somebody who’s an adolescent now wants. They could be a radically different person from you, so what you wanted or needed 20 or 30 years ago is not necessarily helpful in figuring out what an adolescent right now wants.

Are there any projects or programs that you really feel fulfilled by right now with Scarleteen?

On September 3rd, our comic, Wait, What? A Comic Book Guide to Relationships, Bodies, and Growing Up came out! The comic is for middle readers and what we wanted to focus on is how young people—10 to 11- or 15-year-olds—can talk with each other about basic issues, so that readers in this age group can see a good model of how to be supportive of each other. For example, how to talk about gender roles, boyfriends and girlfriends, crushes and feeling awkward in bodies. There’s absolutely some sexual anatomy [in the book]; there’s some stuff about gender identity, orientation, how to build a support group, how people use virginity constructs to make other people feel bad… for 75 pages, there’s a lot! For example, there’s one character who says he’s worried that his genitals are weird, and our approach is to say that genitals are weird—so, we have two pages of illustrations of different ways genitals can look!

Separate from Scarleteen, I just got a contract to write a guide to perimenopause and menopause: What Fresh Hell is This: Perimenopause, Menopause, Other Indignities, and You–A Guide. By and large, a lot of [the perimenopause and menopause literature] out there assumes that you’re cisgender, assumes that you’re straight, assumes that you had kids, assumes that you’re married to a man. It’s meant for a very different generation than Gen Xers.

[This book]’s pretty much going to be: you’re in this, this is going to be terrible, this is what’s going to happen, this is how we’re going to keep from killing people and hopefully come out on the other side. I want to make a list of everyone that’s been in perimenopause and hasn’t killed anyone. Just as a little inspiration just to be like: see, if they did it, you can do it. YOU can not kill anyone through this process.

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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Government to include cybersecurity education in school curricular

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

General News of Tuesday, 22 October 2019

Source: ghananewsagency.org

2019-10-22

Ursula Owusu Ekuful, Minister Of CommunicationsUrsula Owusu-Ekuful, the Minister of Communications

Government has said that it would incorporate cybersecurity education into the basic and senior secondary schools in Ghana as part of an agenda to build capacity of citizenry in tackling cybersecurity.

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo said this in a speech read on his behalf by Mr Ambrose Dery, the Minister of the Interior, at the opening of the National Cyber Security Awareness Month 2019.

The President said, including cybersecurity education in the curriculum of basic and senior secondary education would help in building the capacity of citizens from an early stage and take the efforts made during the awareness month a step further.

The National Cyber Security Awareness Month 2019 is being celebrated on the theme: “Demonstrating Ghana’s Cybersecurity Readiness” and spans from October 21 to 30 in Accra.

He said Ghana would continue to look up to other countries which had made great strides in cybersecurity to ensure regional and international collaboration in her journey towards achieving cybersecurity maturity, as part of the country’s digital strategy.

President Akufo-Addo said his government had undertaken a number of initiative that serve as testament to the fact that Ghana had made notable progress and development in the area of cybersecurity and that “We do not plan to rest in a state of complacency, but rather vow to do more”.

He said the Country had ratified the African Union Convention on Cyber Security and Personal Data Protection also known as the “Malabo Convention”, and the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime, popularly referred to as the “Budapest Convention”.

He said “these conventions would enhance our cooperation with other countries at the policy, technical and operational levels in dealing with cybercrime.”

The President said to secure the country’s digital journey, the government had tasked the National Cyber Security Centre, through the Ministry of Communications, to ensure the security of Ghana’s digital space.

“I am reliably informed that, Ghana’s National Cybersecurity Policy and Strategy (NCPS) have been reviewed to reflect current cybersecurity developments and are consistent with international best practices,” he said.

Mrs Ursula Owusu-Ekuful, the Minister of Communications, said the country was no exception to cyber-attacks, especially as government was poised at improving the digital space, adding that, everyone who used any electronic device was a potential victim of cyber attack.

She said digitalization held many opportunities for the nation, especially in the areas of job creation, hence the need for every government agency and the private sector to support the agenda of building a strong digital economy.

Mrs Owusu-Ekuful said as the country hosts the secretariat of the African Continental Free Area (AfCFTA) Agreement, there were numerous opportunies that would be presented to businesses and individual citizens.

She, however, said hosting the AfCFTA Secretariat was a wake-up call for all and sundry to support the agenda of securing the digital space to protect everyone from cyber attacks.

The Minister said by 2020, all government payments systems would be done electronically and that also called for securing the cyberspace.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Networking, engineering and education | Cyber Work Podcast

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Tia Hopkins, Vice President of Global Sales Engineering at eSentire, and Cyber Work host Chris Sienko discuss Hopkins’ past in physical networking, her pursuit of education and how she advanced her career.

Additional Resources

– View the transcript, additional episodes and promotional offers: https://www.infosecinstitute.com/podcast

– Celebrate National Cybersecurity Awareness Month with 30 days of free Infosec Skills training: https://www2.infosecinstitute.com/ncsam2019-podcast

– Join us in the fight against cybercrime: https://www.infosecinstitute.com

 

About the Cyber Work Podcast

Knowledge is your best defense against cybercrime. Each week on Cyber Work, host Chris Sienko sits down with a new industry thought leader to discuss the latest cybersecurity trends — and how those trends are affecting the work of infosec professionals. Together we’ll empower everyone with the knowledge to stay one step ahead of the bad guys.

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USENIX Workshop on Advances in Security Education (ASE)

General Cybersecurity Conference

 August 13, 2018 | Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Cybersecurity Conference Description

The 2018 USENIX Advances in Security Education Workshop (ASE ’18) will be co-located with the 27th USENIX Security Symposium, and is intended to be a venue for cutting-edge research, best practices, and experimental curricula in computer security education.

The workshop welcomes a broad range of paper and demo submissions on the subject of computer security education in any setting (K–12, undergraduate, graduate, non-traditional students, professional development, and the general public) with a diversity of goals, including developing or maturing specific knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs), or improving awareness of issues in the cyber domain (e.g., cyber literacy, online citizenship). ASE is intended to be a venue for educators, designers, and evaluators to collaborate, share knowledge, improve existing practices, critically review state-of-the-art, and validate or refute widely held beliefs.

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(Munich) Executive Education

General Cybersecurity Conference

 August 8, 2018 | Munich, Germany

Cybersecurity Conference Description

This is a ONE-DAY conference for Managers, Senior Managers, Executives and Board of Directors across all industries. Introduces attendees to the most relevant cybersecurity topics to ensure they have the knowledge to make more
informed decisions and better manage business risk.

8 Topical Sessions
• Foundational Information Security Concepts
• Security Awareness
• Social Engineering
• Spear-Phishing & Ransomware
• Cybercriminal Psychology
• Insider Threats
• External Threat Actors

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Hackers are #targeting schools, #U.S. Department of Education warns

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hackers are #targeting schools, #U.S. Department of Education warns

When Superintendent Steve Bradshaw first received a threatening text message in mid-September, he didn’t know it was coming from a hacker trying to exploit his Montana school district.
But soon, students and other schools around Flathead County were receiving threatening messages, too. More than 30 schools in the district shutdown for three days.
“The messages weren’t pleasant messages,” Bradshaw said. “They were ‘splatter kids’ blood in the hallways,’ and things like that.”
The U.S. Department of Education is now warning teachers, parents, and K-12 education staff of a cyberthreat targeting school districts across the country.
So far, at least three states have been targeted by the extortion attempt from hackers asking schools to give them money or the group will release stolen private records, according to the department.

“In some cases, this has included threats of violence, shaming, or bullying the children unless payment is received,” the department wrote in an advisory this week.
Bradshaw, the superintendent of schools in Columbia Falls, Montana said a hacking group broke into multiple school servers and stole personal information on students and possibly staff. He said after the threatening messages came, hackers asked for ransom.
In a ransom note sent to a number of Columbia Falls school district members and released by the county’s sheriff’s department, the hacking group called the Dark Overlord threatened the district and demanded up to $150,000 in bitcoin to destroy the stolen private data.
The threatening letter talked about use of force, mentioned the name “Sandy Hook,” the elementary school in Connecticut where 20 small children and six adults were shot dead, and said victims would suffer financial and reputational damage.
Law enforcement said they did not believe the threats and determined the attackers were located outside of the U.S.
“We feel this is important to allow our community to understand that the threats were not real, and were simply a tactic used by the cyber extortionists to facilitate their demand for money,” the Flathead County Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post last month.
Bradshaw said the district is not paying the ransom, and he is still receiving threatening messages.

The same hackers also targeted the Johnson Community School District in Iowa earlier this month, and the district canceled all classes on October 3. According to local media reports, the hackers also sent threatening text messages to children and their parents.
The hacking group previously attempted to extort Netflix (NFLX, Tech30) after hacking its production studio, Larson Studios. The group released episodes of Orange is the New Black online last spring.
It’s unclear why the Dark Overlord began targeting schools but someone from the hacking group told the Daily Beast they are “escalating the intensity of our strategy in response to the FBI’s persistence in persuading clients away from us.”
The Department of Education says the hackers are probably targeting districts “with weak data security, or well-known vulnerabilities that enable the attackers to gain access to sensitive data.” It advises districts to conduct security audits and patch vulnerable systems, train staff on data security best practices, and review sensitive data to make sure no outside actors can access it.
According to Mary Kavaney, the chief operating officer of the Global Cyber Alliance, school environments often don’t have a lot of technology resources dedicated to security, but have some of the richest personal information on people, including social security numbers, birth dates, and, potentially, medical and financial information.
“If bad actors can access student [personal data], that information can be exploited for the purpose of fraud and committing crimes for years before it is detected,” Kavaney says. “It’s often only upon application for a job, or application for financial aid to attend college that students find out that their social security number has been used fraudulently — they may have poor credit due to false applications against their history, or worse, find that crime has been committed in their name.”
Bradshaw says the ordeal has been stressful and troubling. Because the district hasn’t paid the hackers, they’re still threatening to release the data online. But, he said, the response from law enforcement and the Flathead County community has been positive.
“We still got people in this country that believe in one another, and it’s been easier to get through than you would have thought,” Bradshaw said. “People care about people in this state.”

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Officials push cybersecurity education amid rise in malicious attacks

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans SALT LAKE CITY — Digital security breaches that impact megacompanies like Equifax, Sony or Yahoo tend to dominate headlines when they occur, but it’s far more common for small businesses to fall victim to cybercriminals and, when they do, the results are typically far more catastrophic. […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Making Sure That Schools Measure Up Under ESSA – Education Week

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Here’s a concise guide to key school accountability provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, including how states and districts handle teacher evaluation, gauge school progress, and fix their lowest-performing schools. View full post on Education…

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