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#onlinedating | As if Thanksgiving Wasn’t Stressful Enough This Year | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

[ad_1] I was just informed that my sister’s boyfriend will be joining us for Thanksgiving. They’ve been going out for two years. I don’t like him and my other sibling downright hates him. Any other year, we could deal with this fairly easily; we have a big extended family. But this year, only immediate family […]

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Jeremy Gillula PhD: ‘Encrypting The Web Isn’t Enough’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via the DEF CON Conference YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn.

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#infosec | Cybersecurity Isn’t “Cool” Enough to Attract New Talent

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

New research published today has found nearly half of cybersecurity professionals believe their industry is experiencing a skills gaps because it isn’t considered “cool” or “exciting.”

The “Opportunity in Cybersecurity 2020” report surveyed over 200 cybersecurity professionals in the UK and the US about their personal experiences working in the industry. Of those questioned, 42% felt that public perception of the industry as being boring and full of dorks was dissuading fresh talent from pursuing a career in cybersecurity. 

This opinion was found to be most prevalent among millennial respondents, 46% of whom blamed the cybersecurity skills gap on the industry’s square image.  

Shamla Naidoo, former CISO at IBM, said, “To many people, cybersecurity equates to—and is limited to—someone in a hoodie bent over a keyboard in a dark room. That’s not the case at all. If we don’t expand beyond that, we’ll lose out on even more people in the industry.” 

The report was drawn from surveys and research conducted by the Center for Economics and Business Research, commissioned by cybersecurity firm Tessian. 

According to the report, improving the industry’s image to recruit more women especially could have a particularly beneficial effect for America. Researchers discovered that if the number of women working in cybersecurity in the US equaled that of men, the economy would receive a $30.4bn boost. 

Fresh talent who don’t give a fig about the industry’s image may be put off working in cybersecurity because of the lack of equality when it comes to salary. At present, cybersecurity’s reputation is tarnished by an embarrassing 17% difference in how much men and women are paid in the US, and an even more shameful gap of 19% in the UK.

Of those surveyed for the report, 45% of US respondents said offering equal pay would help with recruitment. 

Researchers found that offering equal pay would also strengthen the US economy. An additional $12.7bn would be added to the US economy if women’s salaries were equal to those of their male colleagues.

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#hacking | Will the UK’s new IoT cybersecurity rules do enough?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

As our personal lives are enhanced with greater connectivity – faster download speeds, more powerful smartphones, cloud-enabled apps – IoT devices are quickly extending beyond novelty factor, proving that cross-device connectivity really does have its perks. 

We can answer our door from work with Google Nest, ask Amazon Alexa for a new recipe, but all this ‘anytime, anywhere’ appeal must be weighed against an unfortunate reality – by connecting a multitude of often poorly-configured devices to our personal networks we are rapidly expanding our cyber-attack surface. 

Cybercriminals often seek access to devices to build powerful botnets in which to conduct DDoS attacks on online services or to access personal information, but few recent cases have been as sinister than that of the attacker who hacked a Ring camera to taunt an 8-year-old girl during the Christmas holidays. 

In-built security standards for IoT devices have historically been lax to the point that, in the US, even the FBI has warned that “your fridge and your laptop should not be on the same network.

“Keep your most private, sensitive data on a separate system from your other IoT devices,” it added.

As the number of connected devices proliferates within households and businesses, the UK – in which just 27 percent of consumers aren’t even aware of the security issue (Specops) – is making steps to curb the IoT cybersecurity risk before it spirals out of control. 

Under new government proposals, all Internet of Things and consumer smart devices will need to adhere to specific safety requirements. 

The proposed measures between the government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), and the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) come as a result of conversations with information security experts, product manufacturers, retailers and others.

“Our new law will hold firms manufacturing and selling internet-connected devices to account and stop hackers threatening people’s privacy and safety,” said Matt Warman, Minister for Digital and Broadband at DCMS.

The intended legislation, which follows previously suggested (but unenforced) guidelines, would require IoT devices sold in the UK to follow three particular rules: 

  • All consumer internet-connected device passwords must be unique and not resettable to any universal factory setting.
  • Manufacturers of consumer IoT devices must provide a public point of contact so anyone can report a vulnerability and it will be acted on in a timely manner.
  • Manufacturers of consumer IoT devices must explicitly state the minimum length of time for which the device will receive security updates at the point of sale, either in store or online.

“We want to make the UK the safest place to be online with pro-innovation regulation that breeds confidence in modern technology,” said Warman. 

“Our new law will hold firms manufacturing and selling internet-connected devices to account and stop  hackers threatening people’s privacy and safety. It will mean robust security standards are built in from the design stage and not bolted on as an afterthought.”

Despite the announcement, no date has been presented as to when the rules would be enforceable – legislation would be done “as soon as possible,”  it said, pending further work alongside retailers and manufacturers. 

However, the government’s proposed that any products that don’t follow these rules could be banned from sale in the UK in due course to “ensure that strong cybersecurity is built into these products by design,” said Warman.

Despite the show of intent, some commentators have said the move to enhance IoT security won’t address the root flaws with devices. Stuart Sharp, VP of Solution Engineering at OneLogin, said the move was a “welcome first step” but failed to address the core problem.

“For standard forms of authentication, there are well established and scrutinised protocols such as SAML, OAuth and OIDC. IoT lacks any such standards, and the proposed regulations do nothing to ensure that the mechanisms underpinning IoT communication are secure.”

According to a 2019 Smart Home Security Report by Avast, more than 40 percent of ‘digital households’ worldwide have at least one vulnerable device. Making matters worse, just one vulnerable device can put an entire home network at risk and the most at-risk devices aren’t always the most obvious 

Two-thirds (67 percent) of Americans and 82 percent of Brits saw security cameras as the most vulnerable devices. However, research shows that these are some of the best equipped in terms of fighting off attacks

Just 10.5 percent of respondents said smart hubs were among the most vulnerable to hacking but these have been shown to be some of the least secure – and can, of course, provide a gateway to other devices in a household.

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5 #Reasons Why a #Credit Freeze Isn’t Enough to Help Protect #Against #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security News

When a data breach happens, it’d be great if you could simply prevent identity theft with a credit freeze. The truth is, nothing can prevent identity theft, although there are things you can do to help protect against it.

Still, with identity thieves taking aim at everything from tax refunds to bank accounts, it’s worth asking the question: “Is a credit freeze a good idea?

It can be. But it may not be enough. Here’s why.

When your personal information is exposed in a data breach, you could face a greater chance of becoming a victim of identity theft. More of your information could be out there. And if it is, it might be for sale on the dark web for criminals to acquire.

Consider this statistic: You are 11 times more likely to be a victim of identity fraud if you are notified of a breach. That’s according to the 2017 Identity Theft Study by Javelin Strategy & Research.

No one wants their personal information stolen in a data breach. But if it happens to you, you’ll probably want to do whatever you can to help protect yourself against identity theft.

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Artificial #Intelligence is #Important for #Cybersecurity, But It’s Not #Enough

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The advent of Artificial Intelligence has brought with it a new scope for cybersecurity. Why the artificial intelligence is important for cybersecurity?

The advent of Artificial Intelligence has brought with it a new scope for cybersecurity. After all, an intelligent security system is expected to overcome any sophisticated threats. However, many security experts believe that AI is a double-edged sword and hence it could become dangerous at an epic level if it gets into the wrong hands. Let us make a quick analysis on the unison between cybersecurity and AI.

Cybersecurity is the need of the day. As if we didn’t have enough to worry about with terrorists running wild – always looking to inflict damage – we now have to worry about Cybercriminals as well. And in many cases, they can be a lot more dangerous than your average terrorist.

The significance of having a perfect cybersecurity strategy or solution has grown over the years. All the credit goes to the proliferation of smart devices on the Internet. Also, because of the growing endpoints that are always connected to the cyberspace, cybercriminals now have a plethora of opportunities to infiltrate devices.

Not only do hackers have more entry points to breach, but they also have more sophisticated tools to penetrate even into highly-secured devices or networks. How are they doing it? By mass producing sophisticated malware.

According to the 22nd threat report by Symantec, it is found that over 300 million malware were detected in 2016 alone. Not only this! John – the contributor at thebestvpn, shared the shocking statistic that one in every 131 emails contains a malware. The massive figure presents quite a shocking blow to businesses who then rush to come up with a more potent cybersecurity solution.

Moreover, we can’t ignore the fact that with the passage of time, cybercriminals have become smarter and more adept at countering traditional security practices. A survey conducted in 2017 of 70 professional hackers and pen testers found that 60% of hackers claim they can compromise a system within just 6 hours. Plus, over 80% of the hackers and testers said they could remain hidden from the network for 100 days after stealing sensitive data.

To combat such threats, we need to come up with a disruptive security technology that is not only efficient, but also proactive, faster and more intelligent. One such disruption that can prove itself an ideal security solution is Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Artificial Intelligence & Cybersecurity: A Perfect Unison or a Calamity

When we talk about Artificial Intelligence, the first thing that pops into our mind are technologies like Tesla’s self-driving cars or the Amazon Echo. This is because we take AI only as a “Buzzword” and nothing else.

Regardless, AI can offer more firepower when it comes to cybersecurity. It can cover the lack of manpower that we see in this highly complex field. Likewise, it can run things faster and hence detect threats before they could compromise a system and inflict damage.

Although there is a lot of potential in Artificial Intelligence for tackling complex cyber threats for good, there are some aspects that make it a double-edged sword. Before we move on to the other aspects of AI, let’s take a look at why it seems to be a great cybersecurity tool.

The Significance of AI as a Security Solution

IT experts at a company have a lot on their hands to monitor and analyze. They are always challenged with sifting through loads of security logs and activities, finding security threats that could pose a serious threat and coming up with mitigation strategies to contain it.

Moreover, there are weeks and months of logs that need to be scrutinized and vetted for security purposes. Identifying any abnormality in such vast amount of data and then formulating the right solution require not only more manpower but also more tools and resources.

However, an AI-powered machine can greatly assist IT personnel in monitoring, tracking and detecting anomalies efficiently.

Ryan Permeh, Cylance Chief Scientist, said in an online interview conducted by CSOOnline, “Historically, an AV researcher might see 10,000 viruses in a career.  Today there are over 700,000 per day.” He further states that his security firm uses AI to tackle such attacks.

Apart from that, AI as a security tool can help with the lack of manpower that the cybersecurity industry is currently facing. Over 40% of organizations claim that they suffer from a “problematic shortage” of talent in cybersecurity.

Shahid Shah, the CEO of Netspective Communications, claims that there is a lot of skill shortage in different cybersecurity areas such as advanced malware prevention, compliance, IDS/IPS, identity and access management, etc.

Shah further states that by implementing AI, security firms can depend on “computers to do the grunt work and leave humans to the decision-making.”

Why AI Currently Isn’t a ‘Perfect’ Cybersecurity Solution

If AI can be used to shield our systems or networks from cyber-attacks, it is rational to expect the technology being used for more attacks. Shortly, when AI becomes more automated and developed, we might see more sophisticated cyber-attacks carried out by intelligent malware or viruses.

In fact, Endgame’s security expert, Hyrum Anderson has proved just that at the DEF CON 2017. The team demonstrated an intelligent application that can re-engineer a malware and make it undetectable to even a smart antivirus. A group of researchers was successful in circumventing the protective layers of the AI-powered antivirus with its AI-powered malware 16% of the time.

The research was conducted to show that even AI can have blind spots that could be used to compromise systems.

The demonstration Hyrum Anderson presented isn’t the only research that indicates the negative implications of relying solely on AI. In fact, another research conducted by a security firm, Cylance, predicts AI “weaponization” soon.

According to the research, 62% of security experts believe that AI-powered cyber-attacks will increase in the near future, and hence the technology will be used as an intelligent cyber weapon.

“While AI may be the best hope for slowing the tide of cyberattacks and breaches, it may also create more advanced attacker tactics in the short-term,” says Cylance.

Final Say

AI-powered systems may reinforce our cybersecurity infrastructure, enabling our workforce to detect, contain, mitigate or stop cyber threats. However, relying solely on an intelligent technology that could be molded at our will can be dangerous. Plus, an AI-enabled attack may prove to be detrimental at an epidemic level.

The post Artificial #Intelligence is #Important for #Cybersecurity, But It’s Not #Enough appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Why #micro SMEs are still not taking #cyber security seriously #enough

Why #micro SMEs are still not taking #cyber security seriously #enoughSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans A recent survey of 2,000 UK businesses looking at digital transformation showed the number of businesses with formal strategies had doubled over the last year to 63%. However, businesses with less than 50 employees lagged behind with 64% not having a formal plan, compared to 91% […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Are you paying enough attention to cyber security?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Poor cyber security may harm your company’s reputation, lose you customers and result in huge fines. The sheer volume of cyber attacks is dramatically increasing. According to recent figures, 46pc of companies suffered a cyber attack or breach on their computer systems last year. In 2015, this figure was just…

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Employers aware of cybersecurity threats but not proactive enough

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Employers aware of cybersecurity threats but not proactive enough

Although the study shows that businesses are gradually shifting from a defensive to an offensive stance in fighting cyber attacks, they’re largely ill-equipped to take on current challenges. A 2015 Spiceworks study showed hat while 80% of companies experienced a cyber attack, only 29% had a cyber expert on staff….

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