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A new #Facebook #security feature reveals #fraudulent #Facebook-like #mails

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A new Facebook security feature protects users from identity theft, the tech giant is taking note of every email it has “recently” sent to its users.

Facebook has rolled out a new security feature to protect users from identity theft, the tech giant is taking note of every email it has “recently” sent to its users.

The full list of email sent by Facebook is available under the Settings menu on the social network platform.

Facebook users that will receive a message allegedly sent by the social network giant can check its authenticity by viewing the new “See recent emails from Facebook” section at the bottom of the Security and Login page.

Facebook security feature

If the message is not included in the list it is fraudulent and must be discarded.

“Facebookmail.com is a common domain that Facebook uses to send notifications when we detect an attempt to log in to your account or change a password. If you’re unsure if an email you received was from Facebook, you can check its legitimacy by visiting facebook.com/settings to view a list of security-related emails that have been recently sent.” states the announcement published by Facebook. 

Even if threat actors are able to disguise emails, to make them look like official messages sent by Facebook, the new Facebook security feature will help users to identify phishing attacks.

Crooks use phishing attacks to obtain victim’s credentials, access their profile, and perform a wide range of fraudulent activities.

Compromised accounts could be used to send out phishing messages or to spread malware.

Users that will discover email scam pretending to be sent from the Facebook platform can report it to phish@facebook.com.

If your account has been compromised due to a phishing attempt, visit facebook.com/hacked.

“If you’ve checked this tool and determined that an email you received is fake, we encourage you to report it to phish@facebook.com, and if you believe your account has been compromised due to a phishing attempt, you may attempt to regain access to your account at: facebook.com/hacked. ” concludes Facebook.

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Taking #Facebook #Quizzes Could Put You at #Risk for #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

From phishing schemes to a thief pilfering your passport, there are plenty of ways to fall victim to identity theft. And now, participating in Facebook quizzes is one of them. As ABC News reports, the seemingly harmless surveys that populate your feed could wind up providing unscrupulous hackers with the answers to your online security questions.

Popular Facebook quizzes often ask users to answer a series of sharable personal questions, ranging from the name of their pet to their birth city. Some people see them as a fun way to bond with friends, or a way to make new ones. But as one local police department in Massachusetts recently noted on Facebook, many of these queries are similar—if not identical—to security questions used by banks and other institutions.

“Please be aware of some of the posts you comment on,” the Sutton Police Department in Massachusetts wrote in a cautionary message. “The posts that ask what was your first grade teacher, who was your childhood best friend, your first car, the place you [were] born, your favorite place, your first pet, where did you go on your first flight … Those are the same questions asked when setting up accounts as security questions. You are giving out the answers to your security questions without realizing it.”

Hackers can use these questions to build a profile and hack into your accounts or open lines of credit, the department said. They could also trick you into clicking on malicious links.

Experts say it’s OK to take part in a Facebook quiz, but you should never reveal certain personal facts. Take quizzes only from respected websites, and always carefully vet ones that ask for your email address to access the poll or quiz. And while you’re at it, consider steering clear of viral memes, like this one from 2017, which asked Facebook users to name memorable concerts (yet another common security question).

The post Taking #Facebook #Quizzes Could Put You at #Risk for #Identity Theft appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Facebook fights #imposter accounts with #facial #recognition

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Facebook on Tuesday announced a new facial recognition tool that can spot you even when you haven’t been tagged – handy when some identity thief goes and puts up an account with your photo.

It also introduced a way for the visually impaired to know more about who’s in the photos they encounter on Facebook.

You might be a bit dizzy from Facebook’s ever-changing privacy controls. You might be wondering how to keep yourself from ever being tagged in the first place, which would be pretty nice, privacy-wise. Sorry, Charlie: long story short, we’re still stuck with having to go untag ourselves, since nobody’s forced to ask us before they do the deed.

Short story long, on the facial recognition front Facebook says it’s received feedback from people saying that they’d find it easier to manage face recognition through a simple setting, so it paired the new tools with a single on/off control. It says that if your tag suggestions setting is currently set to “none,” then your default face recognition setting will be set to “off” and will remain that way until you decide to change it.

At which point you may be saying, as was I, Who now? What? Where dat?

For which Facebook has this page with instructions about how to turn off tag suggestions for photos of you. Mind you, it doesn’t stop anybody from tagging you – all it does is stop Facebook from suggesting that people tag you in photos that look like you.

Anyhow, back to the notifications when Facebook spots photos of you even though you haven’t been tagged: from hereon in, if you’re part of the audience allowed to see the image, you can choose whether to tag yourself, roam free and untagged like the wild mustang you are, or reach out to the person who posted the photo if you have concerns about it.

You can, that is, unless you’re in Canada or the EU, where all this is moot: Facebook doesn’t currently offer facial recognition there (a situation brought about after backlash from users and regulators. In 2012, the company, under pressure, turned off facial recognition in Europe and deleted the user-identifying data it already held.)

If you’re in a photo but you’re not in the post’s selected audience, you are out of luck, since Facebook says it “always respect[s] the privacy setting people select when posting a photo on Facebook (whether that’s friends, public or a custom audience).” Thus, you can still be in a photo and not receive a notification if you’re not in the audience.

At any rate, the new use of facial recognition is mostly about letting you know if someone has uploaded your photo as their profile picture. Facebook wants to prevent people from impersonating others on the platform.

This isn’t the first approach it’s taken to the problem: In March 2016, it was testing a feature that alerted users if somebody was impersonating them. Impersonation was one reported source of harassment that was brought up in a series of roundtables the company held around the world to discuss women’s safety on social media.

With regards to helping the visually impaired, two years ago, Facebook launched an automatic alt-text tool that describes photos to people with vision loss. Combining it with facial recognition will enable people who use screen readers to know who appears in photos in their News Feed even if people aren’t tagged.

A little background on all this facial recognition stuff:

Since 2010, face recognition technology has “helped bring people closer together on Facebook.”

Well, that’s the way Facebook tells it.

Let’s rewrite the fairy tale from the perspective of we, the huddled, relentlessly tagged masses: Since 2010, Facebook’s been “helping us” by facially recognizing people in photos, suggesting their names for tagging, and not bothering to ask the people whom Facebook thought it had recognized whether or not they actually wanted to be tagged.

There have been notifications when we’re tagged, and then we’ve had to go untag ourselves. We have not, mind you, been notified before we’ve been tagged, in case we don’t want to be tagged in the first place, by the paparazzi we call friends and family.

Since 2010, Facebook’s facial recognition has gone through all sorts of gyrations. At one point, Facebook appeared to have gotten to the point where its systems don’t even have to see your face to recognize your face. In 2015, Facebook’s artificial intelligence team scored 83% facial recognition accuracy, even for photos where faces weren’t clearly visible, by relying on cues such as a person’s stance and body type.

All this, in spite of the fact that people overwhelmingly loathe it when their photos are posted without their approval.

To Facebook’s credit, though, it’s done at least one privacy-positive thing vis-a-vis facial recognition: in November 2015, the company said it was putting together a program to warn parents before they share photos of children publicly instead of just with friends.

It was refreshing to see Facebook planning to do something about the missteps that people make with photos that are feeding into its mushrooming database of facial recognition biometric data.

(Its Jabba the Hut of a face database hasn’t exactly given up on bread and pasta, however; in April 2016, Facebook announced that it was moving beyond still photos to auto-tagging faces [and cats, and fireworks, and food] in videos. Talk about shooting growth hormones into a database!).

The heads-up to parents was a good step. We can count the extra help for the visually impaired to that side of the facial recognition ledger, too. Also, being told when people are using your photos as their own profile pictures is a win.

We’d still like to see Facebook come out with a setting where you specify that you can’t be tagged at all. Or how about going backwards one more step in the process?

Given that Facebook can recognize your likeness without you being tagged, it would seem to be possible that the company could offer a setting through which users could choose to have photos of themselves pre-emptively barred from being posted at all.

Would you opt for that one?

The post Facebook fights #imposter accounts with #facial #recognition appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Facebook and Twitter play bigger role in Congressional election-hacking probe

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

As Congressional investigations into Russia’s role in manipulating the election for U.S. president deepens, tech companies are assuming a more central role in the inquiries. Both Twitter and Facebook are stepping up their efforts to cooperate with Congressional investigations into Russian interference with last year’s presidential election. For Twitter, that…

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What is Facebook cloaking, and why is it so dangerous?

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans I’m sure that you’ve been hearing a lot about “fake news” recently. Writers actually get paid to fabricate stories, intended to catch people’s attention and trick them into clicking. It’s big business these days and can generate tons of revenue off clicks. Clicking a link to […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Facebook scams: When your “friends” are actually hackers

Facebook scams: When your “friends” are actually hackersSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Scams cost Americans roughly $50 billion each year, and according to the Better Business Bureau, they affect one in four homes. The most frequently reported scams are delivered by phone. But more than half of victims say they were contacted online through websites, e-mail, social media […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Facebook To Educate UK NGOs On Combating Online Extremism

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Facebook‘s British division on Friday announced a new initiative aimed at educating non-governmental organizations (NGOs) on fighting extremist content posted online. In addition to training people for countering Internet activities of extremists, the Menlo Park, California-based social media giant is also looking to directly finance their efforts of doing so….

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The Weird Loophole That Leaves Even Well-Secured Facebook Accounts Vulnerable

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Facebook’s security team does its best to protect users. But not all of those users have the same ideas about how to be protected. Facebook serves almost 2 billion users, more than a billion of them on a daily basis. Those users are spread out all […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

INTERNET GIANTS DUPED Google and Facebook lose ‘£77million after falling for phishing scam sending cash to Lithuanian conman’

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ GOOGLE and Facebook have admitted they were conned out of an alleged $100million (£77million) in a phishing scam. The two world’s biggest companies fell victim after a Lithuanian man allegedly tricked …

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Chicago police arrest 14-year-old in alleged sexual assault broadcast on Facebook Live

Chicago police have arrested a 14-year-old who is suspected of participating in the alleged sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl that was streamed live on Facebook.

The teen was taken into custody Saturday night and is one of several juveniles suspected to have been involved in the alleged attack, Chicago police said. He is facing felony charges of aggravated criminal sexual assault, manufacturing of child pornography and dissemination of child pornography, Anthony Guglielmi, a spokesman for the police department, told the AP.

The arrest comes about two weeks after the girl’s family and friends said they witnessed her attack by several males on Facebook Live.

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