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Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked

Want to delete that embarrassing message you just sent? WhatsApp will let you, and so will Instagram — but if you’re using Facebook, then you’re out of luck.

Unless you’re Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO and cofounder of Facebook.

TechCrunch reported Thursday that some old messages sent by Zuckerberg and senior executives have disappeared from recipients’ Facebook Messenger inboxes, proven by the original email receipts sent at the time.

The company appeared to confirm the unique arrangement, telling TechCrunch the change was made in response to an uptick in hacking.

“After Sony Pictures’ emails were hacked in 2014 we made a number of changes to protect our executives’ communications. These included limiting the retention period for Mark’s messages in Messenger. We did so in full compliance with our legal obligations to preserve messages,” the company said.

The Sony hack targeted the emails of Sony film executives, which revealed a side of Hollywood rarely seen by outsiders, and the decision to name the event as a catalyst for Facebook’s message purge indicates how troubling the incident was in Silicon Valley — and that Facebook was concerned about being hacked.

The company also raised the idea of a “retention period,” though there is no such thing for normal users. If a user long presses a private message on Facebook a “Delete Message” pop up confirms that the function will “delete your copy of the message,” and the recipients’ copy will remain.

Facebook-owned Instagram has long had the option to “unsend” direct messages, while Facebook-owned WhatsApp recently launched a deletion function where unread messages can be deleted “for everyone.” A message is then displayed to all participants that content has been deleted.

But Zuckerberg’s deleted messages didn’t leave behind any such message, probably because they had already been read, many years ago.

The messages were originally sent to former employees and people outside of Facebook. According to TechCrunch, the recipients of the now-deleted messages were not informed at any stage that correspondence they received had been erased.

Zuckerberg may be the CEO of Facebook, but it’s unclear how the decision to remove senior executives’ messages would be allowed under the company’s terms of service. The terms only allow Facebook to remove content if the company believes “that it violates this Statement or our policies” or for infringing copyright.

Deleting messages quietly, and selectively, also appears to fly in the face of Facebook’s campaign to “make the world more open and transparent.” Its own policies say that the company “should publicly make available information about its purpose, plans, policies, and operations.”

Facebook appears to have not followed these policies in this instance, and it raises questions about the recipient’s right to privacy.

The news comes just weeks after the Cambridge Analytica scandal which has seen Zuckerberg admit that tens of millions of users probably had their data scraped.

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The post Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Former #Tennessee Gov. #Bredesen’s Senate #campaign fears it was #hacked

Source: National Cyber Security News

Former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen’s Senate campaign told the FBI in a letter Thursday that it fears it was hacked.

The revelation comes as intelligence experts predict a widespread threat of cyberattacks on campaigns and election systems from both domestic and foreign hackers.
According to a copy of the letter obtained by CNN, Bredesen’s campaign “received multiple emails that appeared to be from the campaign’s media buyer” on February 28, which included specific details about a planned media buy and “urged the campaign to wire funds to an international bank account.”
    The letter, written by the campaign’s counsel Robert Cooper and sent to the FBI’s Memphis division, also detailed another email received on the same day which “purport(ed) to be from a principal in the media team that produced the TV commercial, urging transfer of the funds.”
    An FBI official confirmed that the Memphis field office received the letter but declined to comment further.
    Following the phishing attempt, the campaign hired a security firm “to determine the extent of any breaches and review security protocols,” according to the letter.

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    Open #banking holds #promise but #cybersecurity fears loom for #Canadian #banks

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    As banks work to fortify their cybersecurity defences amidst a growing number of data breaches, they are also exploring the promise of so-called “open banking,” a concept that could finally disrupt the staid financial services industry.

    Customers have increasingly moved away from physical branches towards online and mobile apps, but banking has yet to reach its “Uberization” moment, one that breaks down traditional models to usher in new innovations, as Uber has done for the taxi industry.

    Open banking — granting third-parties like financial technology startups access to bank data to develop innovative apps — could be such a “game changer,” according to Toronto Dominion Bank’s chief information officer, Jeff Henderson.

    All but one of 100 payment executives at major banks globally said they were planning major investments in open banking by 2020, according to an online survey by consulting firm Accenture released last month.

    But even as Canadian financial institutions toy with the idea, they’re concerned about the looming risk to consumers’ personal information amid the growing threat of cyberattacks.

    The Accenture survey also showed that 50 per cent of respondents said that implementing the emerging concept increases risk.

    “There’s no question this is a trend,” TD’s Henderson said.

    “(But) I want to make sure that any time we exchange information externally, that is done so in a very controlled and understood manner.”

    In these early days, the exact nature of the innovation in the open banking landscape is unclear, said Bob Vokes, managing director of financial services at Accenture in Canada.

    “What we’re trying to do in open banking is to create new sets of services off of the banking data, or alternatively, allow you to manipulate your banking information in a different way,” he said.

    Open banking allows consumers to share their banking data, which proponents say will spur the creation of new apps and platforms that will make financial transactions easier or develop new use cases.

    For example, a consumer could log into one app and see all their financial accounts, from various banks, to get a full picture of their net worth and move funds in real time. Or, geolocation data could be layered over payment data, allowing a consumer to analyze exactly where their money is being spent, while also allowing merchants to offer them location-based rewards.

    The buzz around open banking is building just as concerns about cybersecurity mount.

    Most recently, Uber announced earlier this month that hackers compromised some 57 million user accounts and Equifax Inc. disclosed in September a cyberattack that compromised the personal information of half of Americans and some 19,000 Canadians.

    It also comes as the Bank of Canada once again listed cyber threats as a key vulnerability for the Canadian financial system in its semi-annual review released Tuesday.

    “The high degree of financial and operational interconnectedness among financial institutions means that a successful cyber attack against a single institution or a key service provider could spread more widely within the financial system.”

    Meanwhile, various jurisdictions are pushing ahead with legislation that would see financial institutions become even more interconnected.

    By January 2018, banks in Europe will be required to share proprietary data, in a regulated and secure way, under the U.K.’s Open Banking Standard and Europe’s PSD2 legislations.

    Canadian institutions are also jumping on board.

    The Competition Bureau said in a report on fintech earlier this month that it is early days “but the potential impact on competition and innovation is promising.”

    The Ministry of Finance said in August it is “examining the merits of open banking.”

    “Open banking holds the potential to make it easier for consumers to interact with financial service providers and increase competition,” the ministry said in a consultation paper as part of a review of the federal Bank Act.

    The Canadian Bankers Association responded to the ministry that while its members are proponents of innovation, they are also concerned about the potential impacts on safety, soundness and stability in Canada’s financial system.

    “Canadian banks have devoted very significant resources to creating well-established information security and data warehouses that meet the highest standards worldwide, the CBA said.

    “Any initiative that could undermine this trust would be very problematic for Canadian consumers, financial market participants and the broader economy.”

    Vokes says these concerns — as well as questions about whether the bank or the third party is liable if something goes awry — will need to be addressed in legislation.

    If additional layers of security protection are put in place, open banking should not raise the level of cybersecurity risk, he said, adding however, that cyberattackers are becoming more sophisticated as well.

    “Innovation isn’t just the purview of fintechs,” he said.

    “As we continue to innovate, fraud and criminal enterprises are also innovating.”

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    Hacking fears take small businesses offline

    more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans After Ken Taylor’s personal computer was hacked he is concerned about the impact hacking would have on his restaurant Templestowe Living Room. “I went into a website which was a bogus site and it basically took a hold of my computer,” Taylor says. “I got a […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

    Bug took Apple’s Developer website down amid hacking fears

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    After several developers reported a possible security breach in Apple’s Developer website as their account addresses showed an address in Russia, Apple has said the problem originated owing to a bug in its account management application. According to a MacRumours report on Thursday, several developers reported that all of their…

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    Police warn of hacking threat via our online fridges and kettles as fears are raised over the ‘internet of things’

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    Household appliances which connect to the internet will increasingly be hacked by criminals seeking to steal your identity, rob your home or bank accounts, a police chief has warned. Durham chief constable Mike Barton warned about the danger of the ‘internet of things’ as more ordinary household items such as…

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    Cyber Crime Fears Drive Up Demand for Anti-Hacker Insurance

    To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans For companies and organizations, an attack by hackers can inflict financial losses, corporate embarrassment and legal action. For insurers jumping into the …

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    Security skills gap grows, raising fears of cyberattacks

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    Security skills gap grows, raising fears of cyberattacks

    Organizations are struggling with a worsening cyber security skill shortage while facing rising threat levels, according to a new study by Crowd Research Partners, an organization that produces peer-sourced market research reports. A survey of more than 1,900 security professionals …

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    ‘Paranoid Republicans’ are reportedly using an app that auto-deletes messages over hacking fears

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    ‘Paranoid Republicans’ are reportedly using an app that auto-deletes messages over hacking fears

    In 2016, the emails of Democratic Party officials were hacked and leaked to Wikileaks — an incident that defined the US presidential election and helped Donald Trump achieve his shock victory over establishment favourite Hillary Clinton. Republicans are now determined …

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    NCC Group hopes for boost on fears of hacking as chairman quits

    Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

    NCC Group hopes for boost on fears of hacking as chairman quits

    Troubled NCC is banking on extra work as businesses become more fearful of hacking, the cyber-security firm said on Thursday as its long-standing chairman stepped down. Paul Mitchell, who has been chairman for 17 years, will leave on May 31. …

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