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#minorsextrafficking | The Gallo Gives Foundation awards $15,000 in community donations | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

As part of its continual effort to make a difference in the community in which it lives and serves, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Gallo Realty’s Gallo Gives Foundation awarded its 2020 […]

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#onlinedating | AsianDate Gives an Insight into the Subtle Signs that Show When a Match is Interested in Dating – Press Release | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

AsianDate gives an insight into the signs to look out for when understanding whether someone is interested in dating and ready for online romance. AsianDate, the international dating platform for […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Department of Parliamentary Services gives itself cyber tick of approval

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans


Image: Asha Barbaschow/ZDNet

The Australian Department of Parliamentary Services (DPS) has self-assessed that everything is mostly fine with its infrastructure, following a leaked report that everything was not.

Last month, the ABC reported that an internal audit written by KPMG had given many elements of DPS the lowest cyber maturity rating possible.

At Senate Estimates on Monday morning, DPS secretary Rob Stefanik said the leaked report was a draft prepared after the advisory giant had completed its “preliminary field work”.

“It wasn’t until a process of validation and verification that a lot of the information presented in that draft was simply found to be incorrect and the final report that they had produced, which had an implementation plan in it, in July 2019, did not have the statements in it that the original draft did.”

Stefanik said that instead of receiving the “ad hoc” rating — the lowest possible rating on a scale that ranges from ad hoc to developing, to managing, to embedded as the highest rating — the department bagged a “managing” rating in 85 of 88 criteria, with the remaining three being scored as “developing”.

Labor Senator Kimberley Kitching asked to what extent the department was able to self-assess its cyber maturity.

“It’s entirely self-assessment,” Stefanik replied.

Senate President Scott Ryan said the final report would not be released, and senators could take their concerns to the private Senate Standing Committee on Appropriations, Staffing, and Security.

“It is not appropriate to release that report because it contains information that could be used to weaken our cybersecurity,” he said.

“We have more lengthy discussions on these matters in a non-public forum to which all senators are entitled to attend and, having consulted officials, both in the Department of the Senate and in DPS, it is the view that that committee, which has a specific mandate regarding information technology in its terms of reference, is the appropriate place to discuss matters that should not be drawn to public attention or exposed to public.”

In earlier remarks, Ryan said public sector networks were targeted across a four-day period in October.

“During this period, the investment that DPS made in cybersecurity has paid dividends,” Ryan said.

“Our cybersecurity operation centre was able to leverage information from partners to be well prepared in advance of the campaign, and protective controls in place, blocked many attempts to inject malware into the environment.”

The attackers also went after parliamentary staff on their personal email addresses in an attempt to gain access to the parliamentary network.

“I’m pleased to report that there was a high degree of co-operation by users during this period, combined with the maturing cybersecurity defences that have been put in place. They both ensured that the parliamentary environment was protected from this attack,” the Senate President said.

“This is one example of many cases on a daily basis where parliament is targeted by malicious actors.”

The parliamentary network and Australia’s political parties were not successfully defended during an attack in February 2019.

For eight days, the attacker described as a state actor was able to remain on the network.

“While I do not propose to discuss operational security matters in detail, I can state that a small number of users visited a legitimate external website that had been compromised,” Ryan said at the time.

“This caused malware to be injected into the Parliamentary Computing Network.”

The incident highlighted the awful password practices present with Australia’s parliament.

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Department of Parliamentary Services says February attack was ‘detected early’

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Department of Parliamentary Services says there is no evidence to suggest data has been taken or accessed, or that the incident is part of a plan to influence electoral processes.

Cybercriminals flooding the web with coronavirus-themed spam and malware (TechRepublic)

Hackers have expanded their exploitation of the outbreak fears with hundreds of scams and operations.

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Google Cloud Update Gives Users Greater Data Control

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

External Key Manager and Key Access Justification are intended to give organizations greater visibility into requests for data access.

Google Cloud today debuted new capabilities, External Key Manager and Key Access Justifications, to give customers greater visibility into who requests access to their information and the reasoning behind these requests. They also have the ability to approve or deny them.

Google Cloud encrypts customer data-at-rest by default; users have several options to manage encryption keys. External Key Manager, coming soon in beta, is the next level of control. It works with Cloud KMS and lets users encrypt data in BigQuery and Compute Engine. Encryption keys are stored and managed in a third-party system outside Google. The idea is to let companies separate data and encryption keys while still using cloud compute and analytics.

Key Access Justifications is a new capability designed to work with External Key Manager. When an encryption key is requested to decrypt data, this tool provides visibility into the request and its justification, along with a mechanism to approve or deny the key in the context of that request, using an automated policy set by the administrator via third-party functionality.

This feature is coming soon to alpha for BigQuery and Compute Engine/Persistent Disk, and it covers the transition from data-at-rest to data-in-use, Google reports.

Read more details here and here.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | FBI gives tips on how to keep your information secure

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

JACKSON, Tenn.– Internet-enabled theft, fraud and exploitation were responsible for $2.7 billion in losses in 2018. The victim could be anyone who uses a connected device, including you.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says its Internet Crime Complaint Center took in a an average of 900 complaints every day last year, ranging from non-payment scams to pyramid schemes.

Jeremy Baker is one of the people investigating these crimes. To prevent them, he has some tips you can do right at home.

“Just like your personal hygiene, you want to shower every day, you want to bathe, want to smell good, your cyber hygiene is the same thing. Just be in good shape,” Assistant Special Agent-in-Charge Jeremy Baker told WBBJ 7 Eyewitness News.

The first thing he said was to have multi-layer authentication.

“If you log into your email and give your username and password, it won’t let you in just yet. It’ll do at least one other step like text you a code or email a different account a code and you put that in and go in,” he said.

To set that up, go to your email account, click security, and turn on the two-step verification.

Also, check your passwords.

“Think about somebody sitting in their mother’s basement all day trying to guess what your password is. Make it hard for that person to do it,” Baker said.

He said the passwords should be long and unpredictable.

“So, if I’m a Green Bay Packers fan, I shouldn’t make it ‘Green Bay Packers Fan,’” Baker said.

And if you post about the Packers all over social media, hackers might be able to use that.

“I’ve actually seen some huge cases where some industrious and creative criminals tracked executives on social media,” he said. “That is exactly how they got millions of dollars out of these large companies. Because they knew exactly what to say and when to say it and when to hit, based on the executive’s availability or lack-of availability.”

Keeping that safe is as easy as changing the privacy setting on social media from public to private.

But, most importantly, trust your gut. If you see a website or email that doesn’t look secure, don’t click or open it.

“Because those are actually the two biggest things we still see, even as complicated as technology gets, it’s usually caused by people opening or clicking things they shouldn’t,” Baker said.

And, the FBI says give the computer a break and turn it off. If the computer isn’t on, hackers can’t get into it.

“Make it hard for the bad guys to make you a victim,” he said.

Baker also offers a few other tips:

Use different computers for internet use and private use.

Install and keep up with anti-virus protection and software.

Keep your computer, tablet and phones up-to-date with the latest software, as the makers are constantly researching and updating.

And, back up your data.

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Millennials are more aware of #cyber risks yet are ‘alarmingly’ careless #online. What gives?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Millennials are more aware of #cyber risks yet are ‘alarmingly’ careless #online. What gives?

Millennials are more aware of cybersecurity careers than they were four years ago and believe that cyber attacks influenced the 2016 presidential election, and yet they’re not interested in pursuing cyber professionally and exhibit careless online habits in their everyday lives.

No, this is not the head-scratching dichotomy of the latest viral video from Simon Sinek explaining this either self-absorbed and entitled or passionately idealistic generation — it depends on whom you ask — born between 1981 and 1997. Rather, the insights are from a new survey from Raytheon Co.’s Intelligence, Information and Services business unit, based in Dulles, along with the National Cyber Security Alliance and Forcepoint, an Austin, Texas-based cyber company owned by Raytheon.

The annual study, in its fifth year, captures what the companies call “alarming” trends among millennials when it comes to cybersecurity. And why does a $24 billion gov-con giant like Waltham, Massachusetts-based Raytheon (NYSE: RTE) care?

Because “the demand for skilled cyber talent has become a national security issue,” Dave Wajsgras, president of the company’s Intelligence, Information and Services division, said in a statement. “While great strides have been made to increase millennial awareness in the cybersecurity profession, there is still work to be done.”

Indeed, hacks and breaches seem to grow more damaging and widespread by the day. At the same time ISACA, a nonprofit information security advocacy group formerly known as the Information Systems Audit and Control Association, predicts there will be a global shortage of 2 million cybersecurity professionals by 2019.

Every year in the U.S., 40,000 jobs for information security analysts go unfilled, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cybersecurity-related roles, according to cybersecurity data tool CyberSeek. For every 10 cybersecurity posts that appear on careers site Indeed, only seven people even click on one of the ads, let alone apply, according to Forbes.

Opinion research firm Zogby Analytics independently conducted the Raytheon survey, polling 3,359 young adults ages 18-26 in nine countries: Australia, Germany, Jordan, Poland, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and United States.

Some of the survey’s findings are encouraging, showing rising cyber awareness and engagement among millennials:

  • 34 percent of U.S. survey respondents (37 percent globally) said a teacher discussed cybersecurity with them as a career choice, up 21 percent from the number of respondents who said a career in cyber had been mentioned to them by a teacher, guidance or career counselor in 2013.
  • 51 percent of U.S. respondents (52 percent globally) said they know the typical range of responsibilities and job tasks involved in the cybersecurity profession, up from 37 percent in the U.S. in 2014.
  • Globally, 46 percent of men have met or known someone studying cybersecurity at the high school, university or graduate level.
  • 71 percent of young adults surveyed think it’s their responsibility to keep themselves secure online rather than relying on the government, commercial companies or other individuals.

At the same time:

  • Globally, only 38 percent of millennials were willing to consider a career in cybersecurity. That percentage is unchanged from 2016.
  • Only 26 percent of women globally have met or known someone studying cybersecurity at the high school, university or graduate level.
  • Globally, 63 percent click on links even if they aren’t sure the source of the link is legitimate.
  • The proportion of U.S. young adults who share passwords with non-family members nearly doubled from 23 percent in 2013 to 39 percent in 2017 (42 percent globally this year).
  • 74 percent reported using unsecured public Wi-Fi today in the U.S. as a matter of convenience even though the security risks are well documented, up from 66 percent in 2013.

“We need to be providing the tools for this generation to take action and embrace safe online practices,” Michael Kaiser, executive director of the National Cyber Security Alliance, said in a statement. “We also need strong role models – including parents, teachers, colleagues, and friends – to help improve cyber practices nationwide and encourage the pursuit of cybersecurity careers among young adults.”

 

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Townsville expert gives tips to protect kids from online bullies

TOWNSVILLE parents are being urged to log on to social media to empower them to better prepare their children against the threat of cyber bulling.

St Patrick’s College counsellor Courtney Rogers said it was vital that parents familiarise themselves with the social media channels their children are using.

“The internet is a whole new strange world and it’s constantly developing and evolving so quickly that parents have difficulty keeping up,” she said.

“It can also be an area where parents don’t have as much control as the do in other areas of their young peoples lives because it’s something that can be kept secret and private.

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The Internet of Things gives hackers an attack path

encryption

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The Internet of Things gives hackers an attack path

Web-connected gizmos played a major role in Friday’s attack that took down retailer, social media and other websites.
(Bloomberg)—Are you looking forward to the day when your sleeping baby’s diaper tells you it’s wet before the wetness wakes your baby?

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Football Team Gives Cheerleader With Cancer A Colorful Surprise

When the Friday night lights go on for high school football games, fans and athletes alike don their school colors to show support for their team.

But during last week’s game for a high school in Palo Cedro, California, another color was on everyone’s mind: orange.

As the Foothill High School football team poured onto the field before last Friday’s game, each player placed a single orange rose at the feet of cheerleader Ashley Adamietz, a high school senior who was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia just last month, according to CNN.

At the end of the game’s opening ceremony, the cheerleader had Read More

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Privacy breach at Athens clinic gives pause to local providers

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Privacy breach at Athens clinic gives pause to local providers

Local health care providers said they have taken note of a data breach at a clinic in Athens that exposed the private information and medical history of some 200,000 current and former patients.
“What’s so scary about this … every

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