global

now browsing by tag

 
 

‘Cyber is the New #Black’: #Cyber Expert Points to #Diplomacy to #Solve Global #Cybersecurity Issues

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

With growing threats not only in the physical world but also in today’s nebular cyber world, Christopher Painter ’80 argued that “cyber is the new black,” meaning that “everyone cares about cyber” now.

Painter, who has been at the forefront of cyber issues for the last 25 years, addressed growing security concerns and the role of modern cyber-diplomacy at the 2017 Bartels World Affairs Fellowship Lecture this Wednesday.

Painter, the “weary warrior” of cyber warfare for his entire career, started his career as a prosecutor dealing with cyber cases and served as the U.S. State Department’s first coordinator for cyber issues from 2011 until July this year.

While studying at Cornell in 1979, Painter used punched cards for computer programming and played hundreds of sessions of BakéGyamon, an anime computer game, for his work study. Back then, Painter reflected, “the internet … existed in very basic form. The world wide web certainly didn’t exist.”

But technology has come far since; today, “we are all dependant [on the internet] for financial transactions, social transactions and to communicate really for everything,” Painter said.

However, though this rapid technological innovation has largely “been a tremendous force for good,” it does not come without its dangers.

“[The internet] has been the target of criminals, malicious state actors, terrorists and others,” Painter said.

Therefore, it is essential to find the balance, so that we are “not trading security for openness … but having all these things together,” Painter said.

“Back then, people looked at computer hackers as Robin Hood’s,” Painter said, because the common citizen’s information was not stolen, nor were they personally threatened.

This is no longer the case for the common citizen today.

In 2000, Painter was involved in a case that seemed to be a sophisticated, dangerous attack because it was on a global scale, but in reality, it was a fourteen-year-old Canadian boy, called the “MafiaBoy,” hacking computers.

His acts, Painter said, “had really a disproportionate effect and demonstrates the asymmetric nature of the technical threat.”

On a more serious note, Painter discussed the time North Korea hacked into Sony to pull back the distribution of an image, in which the country was “not only hacking into a system but was meant to curtail freedom of expression rights,” he said.

Taking this a step further, Painter highlighted a major concern regarding cybersecurity: “the fear of a debilitating attack against our infrastructure,” he said, pointing to possible examples of taking down the water system and the power system.

Painter said plainly, “It would have long-term, terrible consequences” as “not just a cyber but as a physical event.”

Therefore, “we have to be cognisant of these threats going forward,” he said.

These threats transcend individual hackers to entire nations, with different states having different visions for the future of technology.

Whereas much of the Western world is open about sharing information, Russia and China are among the countries that “want absolute sovereignty in cyberspace,” Painter said.

“The internet is not run by states — not run by government,” Painter said.

Although governments have influence over the internet to some extent, the private sector is involved, too, as Painter explained, so it is an international issue that different groups of people have to confront together.

Painter believes international law should apply to cyberspace as it does to the physical world. There are a set of norms many countries agree to, such as the idea that a nation should not attack infrastructures meant for the public good.

“You have to get countries around the world to embrace this to really make these norms stick,” he said.

So, how do we deal with the issue of cybersecurity?

Painter said, “It all comes down to the role of diplomacy — in all of this, the role of building alliances and shaping the environment and showing international cooperation is really paramount.”

The post ‘Cyber is the New #Black’: #Cyber Expert Points to #Diplomacy to #Solve Global #Cybersecurity Issues appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Hackers #Attack Global #Banks with Just Found ‘Silence’ #Banking #Trojan

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

One fresh banker Trojan has been detected and found employing techniques resembling ones that the Carbanak employed. The Trojan has been targeting financial institutions mostly in Russia.

According to security researchers from Kaspersky Lab, the new Trojan called “Silence” is used for acquiring continuous access of certain online banking network even as it makes video recordings of computer operations by bank employees, identifies the software they use and the operational activities of the bank. Once equipped with all this knowledge, the attackers controlling the malware apply that knowledge for grabbing cash out of the banks’ customer accounts. Scmagazine.com posted this, November 1, 2017.

By monitoring victims’ activities in the bank, the attackers get all the necessary details from them for sniffing the bank’s networks while escape unnoticed with stolen money. The victims get an e-mail containing one malicious attachment masquerading as ‘Windows help.’ The attachment contains a CHM file with a JavaScript embedded that by default downloads one Visual Basic programmed script and runs it that thereafter pulls down the Trojan installer via its command-and-control (C&C) server.

The researchers state that the controllers of ‘Silence’ possibly are a Russian-speaking group that has targeted no less than ten financial institutions with some inside Malaysia and Armenia although the majority is inside Russia. This is unlike Russian cyber-criminals who usually spare attacking domestic targets.

Like Carbanak, first victims of Silence are duped with spoofed electronic mails that enable the hackers to gain entry inside the network. The hackers then hang around for as long as it needs them to get all the information for striking attack and stealing huge amounts of funds.

The spoofed e-mails are highly personalized to craft them as spear-phishing e-mails. Kaspersky researchers point out that the hackers had previously attacked to infect banking infrastructure so they could dispatch the malicious messages via the ids belonging to genuine bank employees thus making the e-mails appear inconspicuous while trapping the victims.

The Carbanak gang too was the discovery of Kaspersky Lab back during 2015. According to a particular report then, the infamous hackers managed filching a maximum of $1 billion from over a hundred banks globally.

The post Hackers #Attack Global #Banks with Just Found ‘Silence’ #Banking #Trojan appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Reminding The Middle Market That Global Payroll Demands Cybersecurity, Too

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Cybersecurity weighs heavily on corporates’ minds, especially when incidents like the Equifax data breach occur. But often, businesses prioritize security of customer data, then safeguard internal company data. Experts warn some companies could be missing a huge area prone to data hacks: payroll. “Payroll data is […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Global cyber attack could spur $53 bln in losses-Lloyd’s of London

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans The report, co-written with risk-modeling firm Cyence, examined potential economic losses from the hypothetical hacking of a cloud service provider and cyber attacks on computer operating systems run by businesses worldwide. Insurers are struggling to estimate their potential exposure to cyber-related losses amid mounting cyber risks […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Kaspersky Lab chief urges global assault on hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The man who runs the global internet security firm under fire from US authorities over claims of cyber-espionage says governments across the world must urgently launch a co-ordinated effort to crack down on state-sponsored hackers. Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and chief executive of internet security company Kaspersky Lab, said the US,…

The post Kaspersky Lab chief urges global assault on hackers appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Social media ‘bots’ distorting global politics

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Washington – A wave of “computational propaganda”, largely driven by Russia, is impacting politics around the world by spreading misinformation designed to manipulate public opinion, researchers said on Tuesday. The Oxford University team presented research in Washington on the use of automated programs or “bots” on social media aimed at…

The post Social media ‘bots’ distorting global politics appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Experts, Microsoft push for global NGO to expose hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Experts, Microsoft push for global NGO to expose hackers

As cyberattacks sow ever greater chaos worldwide, IT titan Microsoft and independent experts are pushing for a new global NGO tasked with the tricky job of unmasking the hackers behind them. Dubbed the “Global Cyber Attribution Consortium”, according to a recent report by the Rand Corporation think-tank, the NGO would…

The post Experts, Microsoft push for global NGO to expose hackers appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Billings cyber security businesses getting busier in the wake of global WannaCry virus

A cyber attack that spread ransomware across the globe managed to disable computer networks and strike panic in private businesses and government agencies. But by one measure, the WannaCry attack was a dud. The perpetrators of the virus — some are pointing fingers at hackers in North Korea — demanded that their victims pay ransom […] View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Lessons Small Businesses Can Learn from the Global WannaCrypt Ransomware Hack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Lessons Small Businesses Can Learn from the Global WannaCrypt Ransomware Hack

What can small businesses — especially those operating on the web — learn from the latest ransomware attacks. Recently, hackers dispatched ransomware called WannaCrypt. When it was opened on computers, it locked users from accessing necessary data. The only way to unlock the hack was to pay a ransom via Bitcoin. More than 200,000 computers in 150 countries were affected …

The post Lessons Small Businesses Can Learn from the Global WannaCrypt Ransomware Hack appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Business braces for global hacking assault

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Business braces for global hacking assault

A new fast-spreading computer attack and a hacking group’s threat to release a fresh trove of stolen cyberweapons are fuelling fears among businesses and security experts of another global technology assault. The new attack, called Adylkuzz, follows last week’s WannaCry outbreak, which crippled computers in more than 100 countries over the weekend. Both attacks rely on a Windows bug that …

The post Business braces for global hacking assault appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures