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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Accelerator Program for Early-Stage Innovations in Water: An Akamai India CSR Flagship Initiative

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Written by Neha Jain, Co-Chair of India’s CSR Board

Continuing in our commitment to sustainability, Akamai is excited to announce the launch of our accelerator program supporting innovators and building solutions to address India’s water challenges. A concerted effort by the Akamai India leadership team, the accelerator program is being launched at a time when we are witnessing a rising demand for water globally, caused by exponential population growth coupled with a changing climate that is making rainfall less predictable. Closer to home, here in Bangalore, India, we are witnessing the impact of rapid urbanization on our water resources like never before.

From our past experience with Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives and supporting social purpose organizations in India, our India leadership team was eager to build a program that has a strong focus on impact and also reflects Akamai’s core values of innovation, technology, and sustainability. After exploring various thematic areas, we selected water — spanning water conservation, groundwater recharge, water quality, efficient use of water resources, and water governance — all calling for the sustainable management and use of India’s scarce water resources.

After analyzing the available solutions and gaps, we realized that a critical area of need is for solutions that require support with refinement of their products, and ideas allowing for higher market-readiness and scale. We are excited to be a catalyst in this ecosystem and join forces with the Indian Institute of Technology Madras (IIT Madras) — one of India’s premier academic institutions — in this endeavor. IIT Madras has supported over 200 startups through its incubation programs and also houses the International Centre for Clean Water (ICCW), a first of its kind, in-house centre in India, exclusively set up to focus on supporting water innovations.

Together with our accelerator partner, we are excited to embark on this journey, and you will hear more from us and our grantees soon! 

Stay tuned for more updates.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from The Akamai Blog authored by Courtney Hadden. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAkamaiBlog/~3/1RQSs56DbK8/accelerator-program-for-early-stage-innovations-in-water-an-akamai-india-csr-flagship-initiative.html

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Francisco Cabanas’ ‘Critical Role Of Min Block Reward Trail Emission’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via the DEF CON Conference YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn.

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The post DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Francisco Cabanas’ ‘Critical Role Of Min Block Reward Trail Emission’ appeared first on Security Boulevard.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Jeremy Gillula PhD: ‘Encrypting The Web Isn’t Enough’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via the DEF CON Conference YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Signal Sciences Introduces Advanced Rate Limiting for Fast, Easy Protection Against Advanced Web Attacks

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Signal Sciences is excited to announce the availability of new advanced rate limiting features that extend our customers’ ability to detect and stop abusive behavior at the application and API layer.

Over the past several weeks as part of our early access program, we piloted advanced rate limiting in real-world production environments and stopped major attacks for customers from major retailers with large-scale e-commerce operations, financial services firms with mission-critical applications to major online media companies that stream video content to hundreds of millions of users monthly.

The Value of Intelligent Rate Limiting to Protect Applications

The primary objective of rate limiting is to prevent apps, APIs and infrastructure from being exploited by abusive request traffic, much of it originating from automated bot operators. Stopping this traffic from reaching your app and API endpoints means availability, reliability and a satisfying customer experience.

Up to this point, customers have used the Advanced Rules capability of our next-gen WAF to monitor and block web request traffic that attempts to carry out application denial-of-service attacks, brute-force credential stuffing, content scraping or API misuse.

Advanced rate limiting from Signal Sciences stops abusive malicious and anomalous high volume web and API requests and reduces web server and API utilization while allowing legitimate traffic through to your applications and APIs.

With our new advanced rate limiting capability, Signal Sciences customers can leverage the ease of use, effective defense and precise blocking they’ve come to expect from our next-gen WAF and RASP solution. In addition to out-of-the-box protection, they also gain immediate insight and understanding of the traffic origins and can take granular custom actions by:

  • Creating application-specific rules to prevent app and API abuse
  • Defining custom conditions to block abusive requests
  • Identifying and responding to a real-time list of IPs that have been rate limited
  • Taking action on the identified source IP addresses with one click

How Signal Sciences Advanced Rate Limiting Works

Leveraging our award-winning app and API web protection technology, advanced rate limiting provides intelligent controls to reduce the number of requests directed at key web application functions such as credit card validation forms, forgot password fields, email subscription sign-ups, gift card balance checkers and more.

Signal Sciences makes it easy to create application-specific rate limiting rules. One-click actions enable further control over automated volumetric web requests.

Our technical approach for this new capability was informed by the expertise our company has gained from protecting over a trillion web requests monthly. This experience shows us that web requests that result in application abuse can blend in with legitimate traffic. Signal Sciences advanced rate limiting is designed to identify such traffic and prevent individual IPs from causing app abuse.

Take the next step and effectively stop and manage abusive traffic

We invite you to learn about other common attack scenarios that customers use advanced rate limiting to thwart and how easy it makes stopping and managing the attack origin traffic: download the rate limiting data sheet or request a demo today.

The post Signal Sciences Introduces Advanced Rate Limiting for Fast, Easy Protection Against Advanced Web Attacks appeared first on Signal Sciences.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Signal Sciences authored by Brendon Macaraeg. Read the original post at: https://www.signalsciences.com/blog/signal-sciences-introduces-advanced-rate-limiting-protection-against-advanced-web-attacks/

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Daniel Kim’s ‘Keynote Speech: Monero Introduction And Investor Perspective’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via the DEF CON Conference YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | K-12 Remote Learning Checklist: Securing Data in a Remote Learning Environment

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

12-Step Remote Learning Checklist to Help District IT Protect Student and Staff Data

K-12 school districts across the country are shutting down to increase “social distancing” and help slow down the outbreak of COVID-19—the disease caused by exposure to the new coronavirus. Many are either considering or preparing for a shift to remote learning for the remainder of the year.

Technologies focused on learning management, online teaching, collaboration, and video conferencing will help districts provide students and staff with the tools needed to move forward with remote learning. This shift requires a lot of time and effort for district IT teams to vet, implement, and support in the coming weeks.

But K-12 IT teams must also plan for the adjustments in cyber safety and security this shift will require.

Students and staff will be accessing their Google and/or Microsoft accounts from locations outside of the school’s networks. They will also be using new, often OAuth-enabled, EdTech SaaS for a variety of learning and student management purposes. Both of these trends expose district information systems to data security and student data privacy risks.

G Suite & Office 365 Data Security & Student Safety Remote Learning Checklist

What is G Suite and Office 365 security and student safety? It is the district’s ability to have visibility and control into the activity taking place in collaborative cloud software as a service (SaaS) applications—such as Google G Suite and Microsoft Office 365—commonly used by districts today.

If or when your district moves to remote learning, traditional perimeter security safeguards, such as firewalls and content filters, become less effective. This is especially true if your district doesn’t have 1:1 device capabilities. Students will be accessing their school account from an unmanaged device without all the security measures a district device would have.

[FREE] K-12 REMOTE LEARNING SECURITY CHECKLIST: DOWNLOAD & SECURE DISTRICT DATA FROM CYBER ATTACKS >>

 

To help K-12 IT teams securely transition to remote learning and working, we’ve developed this 12-step remote learning checklist focused specifically on cybersecurity and safety protections.

1. Document remote work security policies

Your district’s staff and students are likely not used to working in a remote environment, and may not realize that security tools like firewalls and web content filters are less effective outside your district’s network. If your district hasn’t done so already, now is the time to create and document remote work security policies.

Start by developing a document outlining a list of approved cloud applications to be used for remote learning purposes. If your district doesn’t have a learning management system (LMS) or other remote learning tools already available, consider looking into tools such as BrainPop, Discovery Education, Agilix, Edmentum, and more. Other cloud applications your district’s IT team may want include Zoom, Google Hangouts, Cisco’s Webex, or another popular video conferencing tool that your district is comfortable with using.

Once your team has decided which cloud apps are approved, make sure to include the list in your district’s remote work security policy document. You may also consider including a list of apps that shouldn’t be downloaded and installed.

If your district isn’t 1:1, this will be tougher to enforce due to the fact that students will be accessing their school accounts from an unmanaged device. However, having a guide in place will prove useful in helping students and staff protect their devices, and sensitive data, when logging in to use these apps from home.

2. Create employee cybersecurity training & testing

Simple human error is the number one reason cybersecurity incidents happen in any organization. Educate your district’s staff, students, and parents on common cybersecurity best practices and what to look for in terms of possible red flags.

Create guidelines that encourage students, staff, and parents to look at who emails are coming from. Does the email domain match your district? If there are any links within an email, does the redirect URL match the destination the email claims?

Same goes for file attachments. Are they coming from a trusted source and do the documents pertain to any lessons or assignments students and staff are working with?

You may also want to consider testing your users’ ability to recognize a suspicious email.

One common tool to send out phishing email tests to see how prepared and educated your district stakeholders are regarding cybersecurity is KnowBe4. With this tool, your IT team can conduct phishing tests, password strength tests, email exposure and domain tests, and more. This way, your team has a better picture of where your weaknesses lie and what you need to educate further on during this hectic time.

3. Monitor student and staff account logins

Students and staff will be logging into their school accounts from outside of your district’s security perimeter—and from an unmanaged device if your district isn’t 1:1.

Your IT team must monitor account logins and look for anomalous behavior that may indicate an account takeover attack. Anomalous behavior might include multiple unsuccessful logins, failed multi-factor authentication checks, and successful logins from an unapproved location such as another country.

 

[FREE] K-12 REMOTE LEARNING SECURITY CHECKLIST: DOWNLOAD & SECURE DISTRICT DATA FROM CYBER ATTACKS >>

 

4. Check for unsanctioned 3rd party SaaS apps

Now that students will be using their school device—or a personal device—outside of school, monitoring for risky 3rd party apps is especially important. This is because malicious apps and apps with insufficient infrastructure security pose far-reaching risks to your district’s information systems.

Additionally, the flood of “free” teaching and learning apps on the market creates openings for serious OAuth security risks. Teachers and students alike may take advantage of these tools with the best intentions, but EdTech that hasn’t been properly vetted can lead to a variety of cybersecurity risks.

Your IT team should monitor which apps are granted OAuth access to district Google and/or Microsoft accounts, check what permissions are granted, and be able to remove the apps that don’t meet your infrastructure security, data security, and/or student data privacy policies.

5. Monitor for improper file sharing and access

Student data privacy laws still apply when your district transitions to remote learning, and keeping track of data becomes more difficult when students and staff access everything remotely.

To help prevent any financial, staff, and/or student data from leaving your district’s G Suite or Office 365 environment, look for drives, folders and files that have given external accounts access to view and/or edit. If any external shares are found, make sure to break them and set up policies to automatically remediate when a future external share is granted.

6. Secure personally identifiable information (PII) and create data loss prevention policies

Data loss prevention is a strategy to ensure the sensitive information of students and staff are protected and don’t inadvertently leave the network. Have your IT team start by checking email and files for PII, such as social security numbers, W2s, and bank account information. Then, delete, quarantine, or revoke access to any information that is being improperly shared.

Once complete, set up automatic policies to remediate all PII that leaves your district’s network to ensure FERPA requirements are met.

7. Create student safety monitoring & policies

Just because your district’s students are distanced from one another as a result of school closures and self-isolation, doesn’t mean that they aren’t communicating via their school Google or Microsoft accounts.

Students may be using their school accounts to send emails or use Google Docs as a chat board. It’s important for your IT team to continue monitoring for signals of cyberbullying, self-harm, inappropriate content, abuse, and other forms of student safety threats. Unfortunately, it may be easier for these issues to go undetected during this time.

8. Enable anti-phishing and anti-malware protection

With dispersed students and staff, cybersecurity risks in your district are going to increase. Your IT team will need to ensure they have anti-phishing and anti-malware protection enabled.

Students and staff will be logging in from their home networks and maybe from a personal device, which means school firewalls, web content filters and endpoint security may not be effective for the time being.

The best option for your team at the moment is to start with configuring your district’s G Suite and Office 365 anti-phishing and anti-malware capabilities, and layer additional safeguards to ensure district cloud applications are protected—regardless of the device or the location.

9. Monitor for lateral phishing activity

In the event a student or staff member at your district does fall victim to a phishing scheme, it’s important for your IT team to be monitoring the activity that is taking place within district cloud apps.

This means not only monitoring the email traffic coming from external sources, but also monitoring and analyzing emails sent from internal accounts to others. Doing so is critical to reveal signs of an account takeover and lateral phishing attack.

[FREE] K-12 REMOTE LEARNING SECURITY CHECKLIST: DOWNLOAD & SECURE DISTRICT DATA FROM CYBER ATTACKS >>

 

Are you getting phishing email alerts from an internal email address? Is a student or staff member sending an unusual number of emails to other school accounts that they don’t usually interact with? Is an account suddenly sharing and/or downloading more files than usual? These are a couple of examples of trends your team will need to look for more often in a remote learning environment.

10. Make multi-factor authentication mandatory

Multi-factor authentication requires your district’s students and staff to take a second step, after entering the correct password, to prove they have authorized access. Students and staff will be logging in from unrecognized devices, which makes this security tool a critical one for your district to have enabled during this time.

It’s also incredibly quick and easy to set up through your Google and/or Microsoft admin portal.

Multi-factor authentication typically includes entering a code that is sent to their phone via SMS. It can also include phone calls, answering security questions, mobile app prompts, and more.

11. Reset passwords across all accounts and set a password strength policy

Set policies and standards for your district’s cloud app passwords now that students and staff are accessing remotely.

At a minimum, enable your system’s “require a strong password” feature. You can also set minimum and maximum password lengths, password expiration, and more.

If your district already has policies in place, now is a good time to check current passwords to see if there are any passwords that are out of compliance and force password changes through your admin console.

12. Run a G Suite & Office 365 data security & student safety audit

With this checklist, now is an opportune time to run a cloud security audit of your district’s G Suite and/or Office 365 environment. An audit will check for any configuration errors, sharing risks, files containing sensitive information, risky 3rd party SaaS apps, and more.

It’s also important to run an audit on a periodic basis more frequently now that districts are closing or moving to remote learning. Weekly reports can be automated and provide you with detailed information into the security health of your cloud applications, and the activity taking place between students, staff, and external environments.

If your district uses SaaS applications such as G Suite and Office 365, protecting the data and accounts in these apps is a critical layer in your cybersecurity infrastructure.

Without it, monitoring and controlling behavior happening on the inside is impossible. This blind spot creates critical vulnerabilities in your district stakeholders’ sensitive information and is now a much bigger blind spot given the current circumstances.

The post K-12 Remote Learning Checklist: Securing Data in a Remote Learning Environment appeared first on ManagedMethods.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from ManagedMethods authored by Jake Kasowski. Read the original post at: https://managedmethods.com/blog/k-12-remote-learning-checklist/

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Coronavirus and cybersecurity crime – Security Boulevard

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Consumers and businesses alike have been scrambling to take steps to protect themselves from the coronavirus, from flocking to stores to buy out supplies of hand sanitizer, to encouraging workers to avoid large gatherings and work remotely. While we hope our customers are taking the necessary steps to stay healthy (check out best practices from the World Health Organisation here), in addition to health risks, there are increased cybersecurity risks, too. The European Central Bank recently issued a warning to banks about the heightened potential for cybercrime and fraud, as many users are opting to stay at home and use remote banking services during the coronavirus outbreak. At a time of uncertainty and vulnerability for many, hackers and fraudsters are taking advantage of fear surrounding the virus as it continues to spread across the globe. We pulled together the following tips to help you improve your cybersecurity hygiene during this time:

1) According to recent PCI Pal research, almost half (47%) of Americans use the same password across multiple sites and apps. We all know this is a big cybersecurity no-no, but it’s especially important during times of heightened risk that we ensure our passwords are unique and secure. Consider updating your passwords and using a password manager tool to improve account security.
2) In addition to varying passwords, consider adopting two-factor authentication for accounts – most services offer some sort of two-factor authentication, yet 23% of Americans report they have never used these tools to protect passwords or payments! Take advantage of these tools – especially if you’re going to be engaging with more digital services while you stay home to wait out coronavirus.
3) In addition to online fraud, there’s also an increased risk for phone fraud – whether you’re engaging with a customer service agent from your bank over the phone or simply ordering takeout. When speaking with a customer service representative, make sure you double check their credentials and only use the phone number provided by the company’s website.
4) For businesses looking to protect customer data during this time, consider PCI compliance, the strongest standard for payment security. PCI compliance standards can help protect your customers from data breaches and hacks – even when they ignore the above steps to protect themselves!
5) Phishing scams relating to Coronavirus will be prevalent, including emails pretending to offer advice from governments and the World Health Organisation. Scammers will use such techniques to infect your laptop/PC and gain access into your systems. Every care should be taken before opening such communications.

Contact us today to learn how PCI Pal’s solutions can help ensure your customers’ sensitive payment information is safe from opportunistic fraudsters.

The post Coronavirus and cybersecurity crime appeared first on PCI Pal.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Knowledge Centre – PCI Pal authored by Stacey Richards. Read the original post at: https://www.pcipal.com/en/knowledge-centre/news/coronavirus-and-cybersecurity-crime/

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Microsoft Acquires npm: A Healthy Move for Critical Public Infrastructure

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Today, news broke that GitHub and its parent company Microsoft, acquired npm and its public repository of open source JavaScript packages.

In 2018 when Microsoft acquired Github, many in the developer community had a cautious, even emotional response. Given today’s announcement that GitHub is acquiring npm — the same concerns are likely to surface again since JavaScript is one of the world’s most popular programming languages and since the commons of the global JavaScript community reside within the fabric of npm.

On one hand, such concern is understandable. After all, open source projects are created by the community and they exist to serve the community. I can imagine the argument going like this, “npm as the central repository of JavaScript can only provide value if the community at large trusts those who are responsible for running it.” But, what is “trust”? And how do public repositories like npm, Maven Central, or even Microsoft’s NuGet gallery go about earning the trust of a global developer community?

At Sonatype we’ve been the stewards of the Central Repository (Central), the world’s largest component repository of Java and other JVM related components since 2007. Based on this experience, I’ve learned first hand how challenging it can be to serve as the steward for a public repository. I know how hard it is to gain and keep the trust of millions of open source software developers. In my humble opinion, earning trust starts with “picking up a shovel” and solving a problem on behalf of a community to help it grow and flourish. Community trust is further amplified when you can muster enough resources to solve the same problem in a reliable and scalable manner over a period of many years.

But, here’s the thing; operating a public repository in support of millions (Read more…)

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27 Monero Village – Dr. Robin Renwick’s ‘Perspective Of Privacy Blockchain As A Boundary Object’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via their YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Alert Logic COVID-19 Preparedness and Response

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

To the Alert Logic customer and partner community,

With the global coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continuing to develop, Alert Logic is actively taking steps to safeguard the health of our employees and mitigate the spread of the virus in all the communities we are members of, while ensuring the continuity of our operations and maintaining consistently high levels of service to you.

As a worldwide organization that is entrusted to deliver an essential service 24/7, we are well prepared for the unexpected. In addition to our standard business continuity plans, we began reviewing and implementing specific provisions shortly after the COVID-19 outbreak occurred in China. While there continue to be unknowns, we are here and we are ready.

To support our employees in their well-being, we are asking them to work from home and refrain from all non-essential travel. Operating remotely is business-as-usual for our global team. We have voice and video systems in place and have encouraged their use for most customer and business partner meetings. In addition to operational enablement of our remote workforce we maintain the security controls and access management to support continuous monitoring and compliance.

Your day-to-day interaction with Alert Logic will remain unchanged. Our security operations are designed for continuous availability, operating across multiple geographic locations and capable of shifting resources and workflow as needed. Our online systems are built for extreme scale and are expected to operate without disruption. They will continue to be monitored and supported by the Alert Logic engineering and operations teams.

We will remain vigilant as this situation evolves, and continue to adjust our operations as needed. We are confident in our ability to uphold our commitments to your business and trust during this challenging time, and will maintain an open line of communication with the extended Alert Logic community throughout. We appreciate your continued trust and partnership as we navigate through this situation.

Best regards,

Bob Lyons, President and CEO
Alert Logic, Inc.

About the Author

Bob Lyons

As Chief Executive Officer, Bob Lyons brings Alert Logic more than 25 years of experience as a global executive with a demonstrated track record of value creation through technology innovation, revenue growth, customer experience and operational excellence. He is recognized for his success in helping high-growth technology and Software-as-a-Service companies scale globally and innovate, most recently as President and Chief Operating Officer of Connexions, a global leader in SaaS based customer loyalty and engagement solutions. Previously he served as Executive Vice President, Technology and Operations at Ascend Learning, a leading educational content and SaaS company. At Alert Logic, Lyons will support the company’s continued leadership and growth in security and compliance solutions for today’s diverse technology environments.

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