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Here are all of the crazy illegal things for sale on the hacker forum the Feds just shut down

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

On Wednesday, news broke the the Department of Justice dismantled the storied computer hacking forum Darkode and filed criminal charges against 12 people in the US who were allegedly associated with the website. Darkode, which has been around since 2007, was one of the few online marketplaces for English-speaking hackers (most others are in Russian). US attorney David J. Hickton described Darkode as “the most sophisticated English-speaking forum for criminal computer hackers in the world,” in the Department of Justice’s press release. Getting access to the website was a mini feat. Every user had to be vetted by another user, and also provide proof of their own hacking prowess. “Only those proposed for membership by an existing user could join, but not until they posted a resumé of the skills and achievements that could contribute to the criminal community. There was a hierarchical membership structure, and the status of users determined who they could communicate with, and their access to the commodities and services on offer,” wrote the UK’s National Crime Agency. But once users gained access to Darkode, they were given access to an insane cornucopia of hacking products. Journalist Brian Krebs was granted access, and kept a low profile for years on […]

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Cyber fraud is big business here

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Financial fraud is big business, contributing to an estimated $20 billion in direct losses annually. Industry experts suspect that this figure is actually much higher, as firms cannot accurately identify and measure losses due to fraud, says the ASSOCHAM–PwC(PricewaterhouseCoopers) report titled ‘Current Fraud Trends in the Financial Sector’. The report attributes increasing technology-driven transactions in the financial sector as the main reason for growing cyber frauds. Exploiting technology vulnerabilities has become the weapon of choice for fraudsters. Yet another ASSOCHAM – PwC report ‘Evolution of eCommerce in India: Creating the Bricks Behind the Clicks’ says, eCommerce has grown at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 35 per cent in the past few years. The overall eCommerce business, which is valued at $17 billion now, is expected to cross $100 billion over the next five years. As it expands, so will be the incidence of cyber frauds. As of now, the country’s eCommerce industry is relatively small compared with  its size in countries such as the US and China. A big market with high value eCommerce transactions is a rewarding marketplace for cyber criminals. You have to look at some of the cyber-attacks such as Target and Home Depot that […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Here is how cyber warfare began — 50 years ago

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Computer hacking was once the realm of curious teenagers. It’s now the arena of government spies, professional thieves and soldiers of fortune. Today, it’s all about the money. That’s why Chinese hackers broke into Lockheed Martin and stole the blueprints to the trillion-dollar F-35 fighter jet. It’s also why Russian hackers have sneaked into Western oil and gas companies for years. The stakes are higher, too. In 2010, hackers slipped a “digital bomb” into the Nasdaq that nearly sabotaged the stock market. In 2012, Iran ruined 30,000 computers at Saudi oil producer Aramco. And think of the immense (and yet undisclosed) damage from North Korea’s cyberattack on Sony Pictures last year. Computers were destroyed, executives’ embarrassing emails were exposed, and the entire movie studio was thrown into chaos. It wasn’t always this way. Hacking actually has some pretty innocent and harmless beginnings. Curiosity created the hacker The whole concept of “hacking” sprouted from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology nearly 50 years ago. Computer science students there borrowed the term from a group of model train enthusiasts who “hacked” electric train tracks and switches in 1969 to improve performance. These new hackers were already figuring out how to alter computer software […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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