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Joliet single mom cut short COVID-19 hospital stay to care for kids | #covid19 | #kids | #childern | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

“The oldest had a cellphone and could message me,” Faundez said. “We were constantly checking on them, even overnight, and making sure they were safe. …It’s the Salvation Army’s mission […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#school | #ransomware | Ransomware Attack on Hospital Shows New Risk for Muni-Bond Issuers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hackers have finally done what bond issuers may have feared most from cyber criminals.

A ransomware attack on Pleasant Valley Hospital in West Virginia was partly responsible for the hospital’s breach of its covenant agreement, according to a notice to the hospital’s bondholders from the trustee, WesBanco Bank. It appears to be the first time a cyber attack triggered a formal covenant violation, according to research firm Municipal Market Analytics.

The virus entered the hospital’s system via emails sent 10 months before the cyber criminals asked the hospital for money, said Craig Gilliland, the hospital’s chief financial officer. The information the criminals held for ransom did not contain patient data or confidential data, so it was “more of an annoyance,” he added.

Because of the attack, the hospital was forced to spend about $1 million on new computer equipment and infrastructure improvements, Gilliland said. That cost, along with declining patient volume, caused the hospital’s debt service coverage for the fiscal year that ended on Sept. 30 to fall to 78%, below the 120% the loan agreement requires, according to the material notice to bondholders.

“When we had the cyber attack, we didn’t have the sophisticated anti-virus software that we needed,” he said. “Cyber attacks are effective on smaller hospitals and smaller government agencies who do not have the resources and do not spend the money to proactively get ahead of the curve.”

The hospital did not miss any payments to bond investors. Gilliland said he is not aware of whether or not payments were made to the perpetrators because the attack was managed by a cyber liability insurance carrier Beazley Group. Mairi MacDonald, who manages media relations for Beazley Group, said via email that the company does not comment on specific client matters.

“The resolution of the situation will likely cost the hospital via monetary settlements and security hardening, making a financial rebound a bit more difficult than otherwise,” MMA said in its report. “Pleasant Valley highlights cyber risks as, at least so far, primarily a worsener for most municipal credits.”

Cyber risk is a growing concern for the municipal market. There were 133 publicly reported attacks against health-care providers since 2016, 47 of which occurred in 2019, according to data collected by threat intelligence company Recorded Future, Inc. Health-care providers are at particular risk for cyber attacks because patient care is disrupted, so there is an expectation the hospital will pay to remedy that quickly, said Allan Liska, an intelligence analyst at the company. Health-care providers also use unique software that is often managed by vendors, leaving updates to the software out of their hands.

“You have hospitals and doctors offices that are often forced to run outdated and old software that makes them at risk for these ransomware attacks,” Liska said.

Rising Ransomware Attacks

And it’s not just health-care providers that are at risk. In 2019, state and local governments reported 106 ransomware attacks, nearly double what was reported a year before, according to data collected by Recorded Future. Among them were the Syracuse School District, which said it experienced a cyber attack that could “impact its financial position” according to a July 31 regulatory filing, and the city of Baltimore, which disclosed a cyber attack to investors in its bond offering documents when it borrowed last year.

For Pleasant Valley Hospital, the insurance company Beazley Group “connected the Hospital with other vendors to settle and remediate the issue,” according to the statement to bondholders. To address the decreasing patient volume, the hospital has lowered its labor costs and plans to convert doctor offices into two rural health clinics and to offer a new medical withdrawal inpatient service.

The threat to credit will get worse in the public finance realm before it can be alleviated, said Geoffrey Buswick, an analyst for S&P Global Ratings. Issuers can do all the right things, like protect their network and have proper insurance in place, and still find it difficult to fully offset cyber risks, he added.

“The various actors out there, be it a nation-state or criminal organization or just a rouge hacker, seem to have advanced technologies that are changing quickly,” Buswick said.

–With assistance from Amanda Albright and Danielle Moran.

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Former NY Hospital Employee Admits to Stealing …

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Richard Liriano pleads guilty to compromising hospital computers and co-workers’ email accounts, as well as stealing personal files and photos.

The former IT employee of a New York City-area hospital has pled guilty to stealing colleagues’ credentials and logging into various accounts to steal private and confidential files, the Department of Justice reports. He used this access to view photos, videos, and other data.

Between 2013 and 2018, the allegations state, Richard Liriano abused his administrative access to log into employee accounts and copy his colleagues’ personal documents, including tax records and personal photographs, onto his own machine. To do this, he installed malicious programs, including a keylogger, onto victims’ machines so he could capture their credentials.

Over the course of this time frame, Liriano stole the usernames and passwords of about 70 or more email accounts belonging to hospital employees or people associated with them. He then obtained unauthorized access to password-protected email, social media, photography, and other online accounts where the victims were registered.

“Liriano’s disturbing crimes not only invaded the privacy of his coworkers; he also intruded into computers housing vital healthcare and patient information, costing his former employer hundreds of thousands of dollars to remediate,” US Attorney Geoffrey Berman said in a statement. Liriano’s intrusions into the hospital networks caused more than $350,000 in losses.

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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | France Not Ruling Out Response to Cyber Attack on Hospital

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans (Bloomberg) — French authorities said they may hit back at cyber assailants who’ve struck a public hospital, forcing it to suspend all but the most vital systems. “The attacker is still active, and looking for targets in France,” said Guillaume Poupard, the head of the national […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#school | #ransomware | Hospital cyberattacks linked to heart attack deaths, study shows

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Detecting and treating a heart attack is a race against time.Reuters A rise in ransomware attacks and data breaches against hospitals across the US may account for an uptick in heart attack deaths at those hospitals, according to a new study. Ransomware attacks are a rising […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Hospital #pays $55,000-worth of #bitcoins for #ransomed #data

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

An Indiana hospital has reportedly paid hackers a hefty ransom to regain access to its IT systems.

In a statement to local media, Hancock Region Hospital in Greenfield said the cyberattack happened at around 9:30am on January 11. Employees noticed the hack immediately, Rob Matt, the hospital’s chief strategy officer, told the IndyStar. However, the attack still managed to affect the hospital’s email system, electronic health records, and other internal operating systems.

It is believed that hackers used ransomware to encrypt the IT system’s data files. The victim then had to pay ransom to get a key or code that unlocks the files. In the case of the hospital, it paid about $55,000-worth of bitcoins to the criminals, according to the Greenfield Daily Reporter.

CBS reported the transaction was made on January 12, and the hospital obtained the keys. Forensic analysis showed patient data was not transferred outside the hospital’s network.

“We were in a very precarious situation at the time of the attack,” said Hancock Health CEO Steve Long. “With the ice and snow storm at hand, coupled with the one of the worst flu seasons in memory, we wanted to recover our systems in the quickest way possible and avoid extending the burden toward other hospitals of diverting patients.”

He added that the administration considered restoring files from backup, but they decided to pay the ransom so that normal operations could resume much sooner.

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His backpack got stolen in San Francisco. Then he got a hospital bill for $52,310.

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

His backpack got stolen in San Francisco. Then he got a hospital bill for $52,310.

It’s well documented that emergency room surgeries can be shockingly expensive.

That fact was driven home recently for one Daly City man who got a call from the billing department of Seton Hospital asking if he needed help paying off a $52,310 bill for an emergency room medical procedure.

The man was floored; he’d gotten no such procedure and had no idea what the hospital employee was talking about.

The problems began when the man’s backpack was stolen from a car parked in San Francisco, according to Daly City Police Sgt. Ron Harrison.

“In his backpack he had credit cards, passports, a bunch of stuff,” Harrison said.

The victim set up an Equifax fraud alert and was alerted to some fraudulent activity shortly after the theft, then thought the problems were behind him.

Then he got the call from the hospital. Apparently, the thief used the victim’s identity to get the expensive surgery on Sept. 2 and stuck him with the bill.

“It’s something new — you don’t see that very often,” said Harrison. “Usually with identity theft you see people fill a bunch of vehicles with gas, buy goods, electronics.”

Harrison said the victim won’t be responsible for paying for the surgery, but the hospital may be stuck with the cost. The exact nature of the surgery was not disclosed.

Police ask anyone with information on the suspect to call their anonymous tip line at (650)-873-2467 and reference Daly City Police Case No. 17006868.

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Hacker “His Royal Gingerness” Jailed for Cyber-Attack on UK Hospital, Airport

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hacker “His Royal Gingerness” Jailed for Cyber-Attack on UK Hospital, Airport

Daniel Devereux, 30, a British man calling himself “His Royal Gingerness” has been sentenced to 32 weeks in prison for hacking the websites of the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, and the website of the Norwich International Airport. His punishment came today in a sentencing for a case he was…

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Gummy Bears Send 14 Chicago High School Students To Hospital

These were not your average gummy bears.

Students at a suburban Chicago high school were hospitalized on Tuesday after eating gummy bears that might have been laced with marijuana, CBS News’ local WBBM station reported.

Investigators have not yet confirmed if the candies were tampered with or which substances might have been added, but Naperville High School students reportedly told authorities the candies contained marijuana.

Edward Hospital doctors treated 12 of the 14 students after they experienced symptoms including increased heart rate, dizziness and dry mouth from consuming the possibly tainted candies, Naperville School District wrote on its Facebook page Tuesday night.

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Hospital Hackers Steal Thousands of Newborn Baby Videos

hospital-hackers-steal-thousands-newborn-baby-videos-002

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hospital Hackers Steal Thousands of Newborn Baby Videos

Hackers have got their hands on nearly 6,000 private videos of newborn babies and uploaded them to a video-sharing website, according to a Tuesday report by online news outlet Phoenix New Media. The videos were recorded by the Anhui Women and Children Health Hospital in Hefei, the eastern provincial capital, and were part of a […]

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