Hours

now browsing by tag

 
 

Greg Inglis charged with drink driving, speeding just hours after being named Kangaroos captain | #childabductors | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

NRL star Greg Inglis has been charged with speeding and drink driving, just hours after being named captain of the Australian rugby league team. The ABC understands Inglis was returning […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Ethereum #heist: New #phishing scam sees #hackers rake in over $15,000 in just two hours

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Ethereum #heist: New #phishing scam sees #hackers rake in over $15,000 in just two hours

A new Ethereum phishing campaign, targeting users of the online Ethereum wallet website Myethereumwallet.com, has been uncovered. The scam saw hackers make away with over $15,000 (£11,308) in just two hours.

According to security researcher Wesley Neelen, who identified the campaign when he received a phishing email from the cybercriminals, the scam involved hackers sending out phishing emails purporting to be from the Myetherwallet.com website. The email was designed to trick victims into clicking on malicious links that would redirect them to a fake version of the website. The victims would then be prompted into divulging their account passwords, which the hackers would later use to transfer out all the coins in the victims’ wallet.

Although the fake Myetherwallet.com site was designed to look similar to the legitimate site, keen observers would likely notice that the fake site contained a small comma beneath the “t” in the site’s address. According to Neelen, the cybercriminals used a Unicode trick that allowed them to register domains that looked like Latin characters. This ploy in turn, allowed the hackers to create fake sites that can convincingly look like legitimate sites to unsuspecting users.

According to Neelen, some people have unfortunately already fallen victim to the scam. Neelen and his colleague Rik van Duijn, discovered a log file that contained a list of all the wallets stolen by the hackers. The security experts determined that the cybercriminals had stolen a total of $15,875.65 in Ethereum and had then proceeded to transfer the stolen coins to three different wallets operated by the hackers.

Ethereum’s growing popularity has made it an attractive target for cybercriminals. So far, there have been around four incidents involving hackers stealing millions of dollars worth of ether from various wallets. Oddly, in one such Ethereum heist, a hacker who stole nearly $7m of Ethereum from CoinDash later returned around $3m in stolen funds, sparking further mystery about the heist.

The post Ethereum #heist: New #phishing scam sees #hackers rake in over $15,000 in just two hours appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

20 Million Confirmed #Attacks in 24 Hours: #Locky and Other #Ransomware

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

20 Million Confirmed #Attacks in 24 Hours: #Locky and Other #Ransomware

A new variant of the aggressive “Locky” ransomware hits 20 million confirmed attacks in a single day, warns a cybersecurity firm.

Ransomware actors are sometimes incredibly sophisticated, demonstrating careful planning and methodical execution. Some hacker individuals or groups can launch large-scale attacks, casting the widest net possible to catch the maximum number of victims.

To protect yourself, it’s best to get familiar with the types of ransomware out there and how to avoid them.

Here are some figures to give you an idea of the massive scale on which ransomware operates:

Last year, ransomware spread increased by a staggering 500%, with email phishing as the most-used distribution method.
In a given month, ransomware infects 30,000-35,000 devices on average.
During the first 6 months of 2016, 300 new ransomware variants were developed. During the same period, an unknown ransomware actor made nearly $100 million USD in profits.
This year, profits generated through ransomware are expected to hit $1 billion USD.

Locky, a Sneaky Ransomware

First appearing in February 2016, Locky is ransomware, a type of malware that takes hostage all files by encrypting them and demanding a ransom from the victim to have their files returned unencrypted. Usually, with the proliferation of cryptocurrencies, hackers ask for ransoms to be paid in Bitcoin, for obvious reasons (learn more about Bitcoin anonymity here).

Like most ransomware, Locky infects a system via spam (email sent by a botnet), to which a .doc file is attached. These emails often come with a subject that reads: “ATTN: Invoice…”, with a message asking the payment of an invoice urgently.

If the victim clicks on the link, Locky will be quickly installed then it scrambles and renames all files with the extension “.locky” within a system, as well as files in other systems connected to the same network.

This ransomware also removes backup copies (shadow copies) of Windows which makes it impossible to recover files through this method.

Believed to be released by the same hackers who were behind Dridex ransomware in 2015, Locky has been spreading like wildfire across the web in 2017, evolving every now and then by using new sneaky distribution methods.

Just last month, it was revealed that a new version of Locky attacked millions of systems in just one day.

Locky’s Back With new Aggressive Variant

The threat, according to researchers at Barracuda Networks Advanced Technology Group, comes in the form of a new very aggressive version of the strain of ransomware known as Locky.

Per a Barracuda blog post, the attacks originate predominantly from Vietnam, but hotbeds include other countries across three continents, like India, Turkey, Colombia, and Greece, albeit in very low volumes as compared to those from Vietnam.

Barracuda analysts say that about 20 million of these attacks occurred in 24 hours, from the 18th to the 19th of September, and this figure was growing rapidly. Most of the spam emails claim to be from the “Herbalife company” or fake “copier file delivery”.

In an update, Barracuda said its researchers confirmed that the attacks use a variant of the Locky ransomware with a unique identifier. Identifiers are supposed to let hackers ID victims in order to send them tools to decrypt data after the ransom is paid.

This time, however, all victims have been assigned the same identifier, which means that even if victims pay the ransom they won’t receive decryption tools.

Barracuda also said its filters had blocked about 27 million Locky-related emails, adding that its researchers are actively monitoring the situation.

EdgyLabs readers, here’s what you can do if you fall a victim to a Locky or other ransomware attack:

Whatever you do, don’t pay the ransom because paying cybercriminals is tantamount to nourishing their behavior, unless of course there’s no other way to get your “critical” data back.

But in the case of this new vague of Locky attacks, as security researchers found out (same ID for all victims), just don’t bother, because you’re not getting decryption tools anyway whether the ransom was paid or not.

You can remove Locky ransomware using your average antivirus program. You can try to recover your encrypted data by restoring backup copies, but that’s not guaranteed with the new strain of Locky that deletes shadow copies.

Besides updating your antivirus and using spam filters, in the case of ransomware, remember to not open an attached file from suspicious emails of unverified origins and delete them.

But before all of that, make sure you use 3-2-1 data protection.

Use 3-2-1 Data Protection

3 copies of your data
2 separate types of media (tape, disk, deduplication)
1 offline and off-site copy
As always, whenever a hard data drive is compromised, it’s best to reformat the drive completely before using it again in the future.

The post 20 Million Confirmed #Attacks in 24 Hours: #Locky and Other #Ransomware appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Hacking into a bank by lunchtime: 24 Hours With Decoded’s Chris Monk

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Early start today as Decoded is running a Cyber Security Bootcamp in Sydney, so I need to be in an Uber by 07:15am with a peli-case of laptops, a load of lock-picking equipment and a TV. Fortunately I’m not trying to take the lock-picking kit through an airport this time,…

The post Hacking into a bank by lunchtime: 24 Hours With Decoded’s Chris Monk appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Every three hours, an online dater gets scammed

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Every three hours, an online dater gets scammed

In today’s digitally-connected world, online dating has become more popular than ever. In fact, more than 15% of American adults say they have used an online dating site or mobile app, according to the Pew Research Center. According to a …

The post Every three hours, an online dater gets scammed appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Russia-linked DNC hackers launched wave of cyberattacks hours after Trump victory

kremlin-linked-dnc-hackers-launched-wave-cyberattacks-hours-after-trump-victory

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Russia-linked DNC hackers launched wave of cyberattacks hours after Trump victory

Mere hours after Donald Trump was declared victorious in the wake of the US elections, Kremlin-linked hacker group Cozy Bear (APT29), reportedly launched a wave of attacks on US-based targets.
The hacker group, believed to be behind the controversial Democratic

The post Russia-linked DNC hackers launched wave of cyberattacks hours after Trump victory appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Hackers steal 1.4 billion Yen from Japanese ATMs in 2 hours

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

$12.7 million stolen from 1,400 convenience store ATMs across Japan in just two hours Japanese police are working on a rather intriguing case in which hackers managed to steal 1.4 billion Yen ($12.7 million) from 1400 different ATMs situated at different convenience stores around the country. Even more horrific is the fact that the entire […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

The post Hackers steal 1.4 billion Yen from Japanese ATMs in 2 hours appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Dating Site 7Heaven Only Allows Photos Taken In The Last 6 Hours

NY MAGAZINE – Sep 16 – A Swedish dating site called 7Heaven only allows profile photos that are less than 6 hours old. Read More….

The post Dating Site 7Heaven Only Allows Photos Taken In The Last 6 Hours appeared first on Dating Scams 101.

View full post on Dating Scams 101

Kids can suffer ‘dry drowning’ hours after leaving pool

635708344825940332-AP-Virginia-Daily-LifeAs more kids head to the pool in the summer, parents should be aware that children don’t need to be in water to die of drowning.

Dry drowning, also called secondary drowning, can occur hours after a child has experienced a near-drowning incident. If untreated, if can lead to brain injury, respiratory problems or death.

Even if a child ingests only a “few gasps” of water in a pool incident, he or she could be at risk of experiencing dry drowning later, said Purva Grover, medical director of Cleveland Clinic Children’s pediatric emergency departments.

Read More

The post Kids can suffer ‘dry drowning’ hours after leaving pool appeared first on Parent Security Online.

View full post on Parent Security Online

UCSF student fatally shot in Albany hours after temple visit

A UCSF dental student found shot to death in her Albany apartment was attacked hours after attending services at a Sikh temple in El Sobrante, police said as they revealed more details and asked for tips in the investigation into the city’s first homicide since 2004.

Randhir Kaur, 37, was found dead in a pool of blood in her apartment at 1068 Kains Ave. about 4 p.m. last Monday. Her cousin found her body after being summoned by UCSF officials who became concerned after she missed scheduled appointments earlier in the day.

An autopsy by the Alameda County coroner revealed that she had been shot once in the head, police said.

Read More

The post UCSF student fatally shot in Albany hours after temple visit appeared first on Parent Security Online.

View full post on Parent Security Online