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Agencies have #one-year #deadline to #identify #cyber workforce #shortages

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is giving federal agencies a one-year deadline to identify and report on skill shortages in their cybersecurity workforces.

A memorandum unveiled Monday requires each agency to tell the government’s human resource office what their “critical needs” are in a broad range of cyber workforce areas, including security and information technology.

They must submit their findings by April 2019 and provide reports for three more years after.

“I am pleased to provide guidance that will help federal agencies pinpoint their cybersecurity workforce’s most critical skill shortages,” Mark Reinhold, OPM’s associate director for employee services, wrote in a memo sent to human resources directors at different federal agencies.

“Based on these agency reports, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management will identify common needs to address from the Governmentwide perspective,” he continued.

The guidance says agencies must determine whether there is a critical need based on two criteria.

The first criteria includes what an agency deems its most glaring skill shortages in terms of staffing as well as proficiency and competency levels — both current and emerging.

The second criteria is what an agency decides is “critical to meeting the agency’s most significant organizational missions, priorities, challenges,” or its mission importance.

According to the guidance, agencies will need to conduct a self-examination to determine the “root causes” of their skill shortages in their report, including reasons like the talent pipeline, recruitment and retention, training, performance management, as well as resources and budget.

Once the agency uncovers those core issues, they must then submit a plan that lays out how they will “address and mitigate the root causes,” partly through establishing metrics and goals for mitigating such workforce shortages.

The Federal Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act of 2015 serves as the basis for this guidance because it outlined how the federal government would identify and then assess the critical needs for its cybersecurity workforce — specifically the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education Workforce Framework (NICE Framework).

“The NICE Framework establishes a common lexicon that describes cybersecurity work,” Reinhold wrote.

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Focusing on #human-centric #cybersecurity to #identify, #adapt and respond to #risks

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

CIOs and CISOs today must address new security challenges that come with operating in a world where traditional network perimeters are shifting.

Digital transformation has empowered employees to access and interact with data and intellectual property (IP) through a myriad of systems, applications and devices. However, for too long, the security industry’s focus has been on the wrong things. Traditional security perimeters are eroding or becoming obsolete, and so, rather than focus on building bigger walls, the industry needs better visibility.

This year’s headline grabbing breaches prove a paradigm change is needed in cybersecurity. CIOs and CISOs today must address new security challenges that come with operating in a world where traditional network perimeters are shifting.

We now face behaviour-centric risks ranging from the common user error that turns an email lure into a ransomware debacle, to sporadic, anomalous activities that, once presented in context, can be the breadcrumbs leading to the early stages of a malicious insider threat.

This continuously shifting threat landscape requires an equally transformative view and it starts with examining how people interact with critical business data and IP, and understanding how and why these interactions occur. These “human-points” of interaction have the potential to undermine even the most comprehensively-designed systems in a single malicious or unintentional act.

With this in mind, the questions of behaviour and intent are rising priorities as cybersecurity professionals look to get a better handle on the risk posed to critical business data. Organisations need to develop and deploy behaviour-centric security that includes understanding the nature of human intent and the ability to dynamically adapt security response.

Risk is itself not constant and by looking at the reasons behind a breach – accidental or malicious – security teams can better tackle the challenges facing their organisations in the current threat landscape.

Category of risk

Fundamentally, insiders typically fit into three groups along a spectrum that we call ‘the continuum of intent’, which categorises users as accidental, compromised or malicious. However, it’s important to note that people can move in and out of these categories depending on a number of factors, so examining their typical behaviours is crucial.

Accidental insiders are those individuals who make honest and unintentional mistakes, inadvertently exposing the organisation to data theft. This could be down to a lack of training, awareness of processes or negligence.

Meanwhile, compromised insiders are those users with access to networks whose credentials have been stolen and used by a hacker to misuse the system to their own ends. It was this approach that caused much of the damage in the case of the Petya outbreak in June 2017.

Administrative credentials were obtained through the use of built-in credential stealing code, resulting in the malicious activity effectively blending into the background noise of a big network, thereby allowing the attackers to maximise their dwell time on networks.

Cybercriminals are focusing on exploiting the human point of weakness in an organisation’s security defences, due to their undeniably inherent wealth of value.

These attacks are designed to deploy a social incentive for employees to open email attachments or click on a link. Email, by far, represents the greatest risk to an organisation, followed by mobile devices and cloud storage deeming as other areas of concern to organisations critical infrastructure.

More targeted attacks are also seen with specific individual attacks based on membership to a hacked website database, or even with information gleaned from social media accounts.

Concerned with the implications of sharing login credentials with third-parties, banks and other financial institutions have previously warned they would not be held liable if their customers shared account access with third parties such as Mint, a free web-based financial management service.

Finally, there are malicious insiders. This group includes individuals who have both knowledge and access to vital company networks, as well as the intent to cause harm. Forcepoint’s Insider Threat European Survey revealed that 29 per cent of European employees have purposefully sent unauthorised information to a third party. To put this in wider context, one third of organisations have suffered from an insider-caused breach, with potential losses from each incident totalling more than $5m, according to the SANS Institute.

Cybersecurity investment continues to rise, but so does the volume of threats

We recently surveyed over 1,250 cyber security professionals worldwide to ask them about the state of sector and the changes that need to be made. The resulting research, The Human Point: An Intersection of Behaviours, Intent & Data, discovered that most experts do not hold high hopes that more cyber security tools will improve security. Instead, an overwhelming majority of respondents felt that understanding the behaviours of people as they interact with IP and other data was the path to success.

In other words, to determine the underlying cause of security incidents (e.g. data theft and intellectual property loss) and prevent them from occurring again in the future, security professionals must look at the intent behind peoples’ actions, understand the categories of risk and adapt their security offerings accordingly.

Data is everywhere

Modern working practices rightly allow for anytime, anywhere access to data by employees and authorised third parties (including APIs) and data aggregators offer efficient and effective ways of working that companies and their employees have wholeheartedly adopted.

However, with data everywhere and accessible from anywhere, the attack surface becomes much wider. The recent Equifax breach should be a wake-up call for businesses worldwide; to improve their systems so that attackers taking aim at data goldmines such as these will meet with increased resistance. Examining the flow of the data through an organisation is the only scalable defence mechanism, and by looking for and identifying uncommon consumption patterns or the misuse of account credentials on a database, malicious behaviour can be identified.

A human-centric future

Going forward, it is vital that organisations implement intelligent, integrated security solutions that provide visibility into user behaviour, coupled with robust cyber security programmes. By understanding how data flows, who has access to it and why, we can increase the efficacy of security. Compounding this, homing in on normal and irregular data and user patterns, we can reduce complexities and focus on the events that really matter.

It’s time for the industry to stop playing catch-up and start thinking differently about security by understanding human behaviours and cadences. This will enable companies to ensure their most valuable data is surrounded by the right behaviours that enable them to protect against breaches now, and into the future.

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DSP seeking to identify suspected identity thief

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Delaware State Police are looking for the man they say used stolen credit card information to make more than $500 worth of thefts last month. Police said between Aug. 25-28, the man they know only from surveillance footage used the credit card information to buy gift cards and other items…

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Coquitlam RCMP identify romance fraudster who targeted Metro women

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Coquitlam RCMP identify romance fraudster who targeted Metro women

Police say a public appeal to track down an alleged fraudster who used promises of romance to bilk several women out of money has succeeded in identifying a suspect. The suspect’s name has not been released as police are still …

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Online dating fraud: How to identify the most likely scammer profiles

Around 7.8 million UK adults used online dating sites in 2016, up from just 100,000 in 2000. But just as dating app users are at an all-time high, so is the number of people becoming victims of online dating fraud. A new report by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has found that last year, singles were conned out of £39 million by fraudsters they’d met on dating sites and apps. Con artists are increasingly creating fake online profiles and tricking people on dating sites into handing over often large sums of money. Read More….

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Thycotic Acquires Security Analytics Company to Identify Malicious Privileged Behavior Across Systems and Users

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thycotic Acquires Security Analytics Company to Identify Malicious Privileged Behavior Across Systems and Users

WASHINGTON, Nov. 9, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Thycotic, a provider of privileged account management (PAM) solutions for more than 7,500 organizations worldwide, today announced it has completed the acquisition of Virginia-based Cyber Algorithms, provider of network security analytics. Terms of the

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State police want to identify identity thief

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

State police want to identify identity thief

Rhode Island State Police are hoping someone can help them identify an identity thief. Investigators said the man is involved in numerous fraudulent credit and debit card transactions in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. State police said the victim’s debit card was cloned around July 1. The card has been used to make transactions at a […]

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Identify thefts lead to big bill and jail mixup

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Identify thefts lead to big bill and jail mixup

COVINGTON – Law enforcement agencies are receiving more and more complaints about identity theft of varying kinds. Two recent reports in Newton County dealt with a large amount of money and a criminal record. The first report occurred on July 15. The victim in Covington told a Newton County Sheriff’s Office deputy that he had […]

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Investigators searching for identify theft suspect

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH)– Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward to bring an arrest in a case of identity theft in the Columbus and Grandview areas. According to investigators, an unidentified man obtained the person information of another person and opened a credit card using the victim’s information of July and August of 2014. Investigators said the suspect then charged an excess of $7,000 at various grocery and retails stores throughout central Ohio. The suspect is described as a white male, in his early to mid-20s, clean cut, medium build and was last seen wearing a green, blue and white striped pullover shirt and light shorts. Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward for any information leading to the arrest and/or indictment of the person(s) responsible for this crime. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 614-461-TIPS (8477) or go to our website at www.stopcrime.org and e-mail your tip. You can text a tip to “CRIMES” (274637), key word CMH. Source: http://nbc4i.com/2015/08/25/investigators-searching-for-identify-theft-suspect/

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Thunderstruck: AC/DC clue could identify first Ashley Madison hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The identity of someone with intimate knowledge of the hack on Avid Life Media’s Ashley Madison website may be revealed thanks to a track by AC/DC, the Australian rock band famous for pioneering heavy metal and lead singer Angus Young’s school uniform stage outfit. What has this to do with the highly damaging leak of the Ashley Madison customer database? In a press conference this week the Toronto police department investigating the attack revealed a previously unknown fact about the day the company was breached. Acting staff superintendent Bryce Evans said that when Ashley Madison staff logged on to their PCs on 12 July, they were greeted with the hackers’ manifesto accompanied by the song Thunderstruck by AC/DC. While this may not seem particularly significant, it did strike a chord with the investigative journalist who broke the Ashley Madison story in July. Following the press conference Brian Krebs remembered a mysterious Twitter account he had encountered soon after he published his exclusive story last month. Within hours of Krebs publishing his exclusive story on 19 July, the Thadeus Zu account tweeted a link to the Ashley Madison source code, the same cache of data that had been confidentially shared with […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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