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How to #Know If Your #Slow #Computer Is #Secretly #Mining #Cryptocurrency

Mining cryptocurrency used to require thousands of dollars worth of equipment to see any kind of meaningful return, but not anymore. Newer digital currencies like Monero, ByteCoin, and AEON have given would-be miners the ability to mine tokens right from their laptops. This might benefit small-time miners that want to get involved in the sector, but for every good thing online there are always people that figure out a way to use it for bad.

Hackers have begun using these tools to infect computers and websites to secretly mine cryptocurrencies. This emerging type of malware attack has been dubbed as “cryptojacking”, and it could cause your computer to overheat and crash. Luckily, spotting these hidden miners isn’t all that difficult.

Cryptojacking essentially hijacks your computer’s CPU power to mine. This means when you’re browsing the web, the malware is running in the background completely unbeknownst to you. There are a few types of this malware, and some run only when you visit a certain website and others can be maliciously installed on your computer. The best way to prevent this is by using antivirus software and adblockers.

If you’ve already been hit with this kind of malware, you’ll notice either your computer acting sluggish, getting warmer than usual, or its fan constantly spinning. If you aren’t running any kind of demanding software, like video games or video editing programs, this should be the first hint that your computer is working overtime.

If you’ve noticed your laptop acting up, it’s time to go check on what’s going on under the hood. Mac users can view a detailed breakdown of everything their computer is running by searching “Activity Monitor” and using the magnifying glass icon at the top-right of the screen. Windows users can simply hold down the Ctrl-Alt-Del keys to bring up “Task Manager.”

Both of these menus will display a graph of how much of your computer’s processing power is being used. Any massive spikes should be red flags. You’ll also see an ordered list of the programs using the most processing power at the moment. Before ending any of these programs be sure to research what they are, as you could be ending a crucial part of your operating system.

Both Tesla and the Los Angeles Times have had their sites infected by cryptojacking software. Companies with popular websites are the most at risk, as hackers can embed code onto their servers and use the CPU power of everyone who visits the site. But making it a habit to check on how your computer is running will ensure your device isn’t getting used to make someone else a crypto fortune.

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Many #employees know #little about #cybersecurity #threats

Companies are surrounded by cybersecurity threats, but many are not making it a priority to educate employees about them, a survey says.

Nearly half (46%) of entry-level employees don’t know whether their company has a cybersecurity policy, according to research firm Clutch.

The survey demonstrated a lack of awareness that can put companies at risk for IT security breaches. Nearly two-thirds of employees (63%) said they don’t know whether the quantity of IT security threats their companies face will increase or decrease over the next year. Additionally, among entry-level employees, 87% said they don’t know how the number of threats will shift in the next year.

The survey also found that employees are less likely to recognize IT services as the primary area of security vulnerability at their company. Instead, they cited theft of company property as the primary threat to company security, ahead of unauthorized information and email phishing scams.

The findings are a bit ironic, because “most cyberbreaches are caused by employees, inadvertently,” Robert Anderson, co-chair of the cybersecurity and data privacy group at Lindabury, McCormick, Estabrook & Cooper, P.C., told FierceCEO.

“There is a tendency for businesses to not put the emphasis on employees, but they are the greatest vulnerability,” Anderson said.

Read More….

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5 #Cybersecurity #Trends You Need To #Know

Source: National Cyber Security News

Cyberattacks are evolving. . . so must cybersecurity
If the past few years have told businesses anything, it’s that cybersecurity issues are not going to go away. Hackers, and the methods they use, are getting smarter. There are now more ways than ever for cybercriminals to exploit precious data and use it as a digital weapon. Big Data, while bringing positive disruption to business and society, has made it harder for organisations to keep track of information. So, what should organisations (and everybody else, for that matter) look out for in the next wave of cyber compromises?

1. Machine learning

According to a report by Webroot, 87 per cent of cybersecurity professionals use machine learning to predict and identify cybercrime. However, machine learning has also become a valued tool for hackers themselves. For example, artificially intelligent software can be used to automate the collection of information to get hold of data faster. It can also apply situational data to make it easier to crack passwords. Cybercriminals and cybersecurity professionals are locked in a constant game of technological cat and mouse.

2. IoT vulnerabilities

By 2020, Gartner forecasts that the Internet of Things will comprise over 20bn connected things.

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Singapore #passes new #Cybersecurity Bill: Here’s what you #need to #know before it comes into #force

Source: National Cyber Security News

The Singapore Parliament passed the much discussed Cybersecurity Bill (the Bill) on 5 February 2018 and it is anticipated that the new law will come into force soon.  The new law creates a regulatory framework for the monitoring and reporting of cybersecurity threats to essential services in Singapore through the appointment of the Commissioner of Cybersecurity.  It also creates a licensing regime that will require certain data security service providers in Singapore to be registered.

We set out below four key points that you should know about this new Bill.

1. Creation of a cybersecurity regulator

The Bill provides for the appointment of a Cybersecurity Commissioner (the “Commissioner”) as a regulator for the sector.

The Bill confers on the Commissioner significant powers to respond to, and prevent, cybersecurity incidents affecting Singapore. These powers include the powers of investigation such as the power to examine persons, require the production of evidence and to seize evidence. In addition, where satisfied that a cybersecurity threat meets a certain specified severity threshold, the Commissioner may require a person to carry out remedial measures or to cease certain activities.  These powers apply to all computer or computer systems in Singapore and are not limited to only Critical Information Infrastructure (CII) which is described in further detail below.

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14 #Cybersecurity Tips All #Business Leaders Should Know

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

14 #Cybersecurity Tips All #Business Leaders Should Know

As a business owner, cybersecurity can be a daunting topic: It’s complex, threatening, and you might not even know where to start. But considering hacks will cost companies as much as trillions of dollars annually within the next five years, cybersecurity is a measure all businesses — both big and small — must take.

To help break down different pieces of the puzzle, we’ve compiled tips and takeaways from 14 cybersecurity experts from Forbes Technology Council.

1. Cyber criminals feed off human error

“With the proper behavioral changes, organizations can greatly minimize their chances of suffering a devastating blow. It all starts with developing a culture of cybersecurity. But what does that look like?,” writes Reg Harnish, CEO, GreyCastle Security.

“A consistent buy-in among employees starts with driving home the fact that everyone has a role to play in protecting the company’s assets, and no role is more important than any other,” writes Harnish. “Additionally, employees are more likely to stay committed to the task if the security concepts can be easily implemented into their daily routines, much like brushing their teeth.”

Read more in What It Means To Have A Culture Of Cybersecurity

2. But you might want to hire a hacker …

Research forecasts the cost of cybercrime to hit $6 trillion per year by 2021. Whether you own a company or not, everyone is at risk of having their data stolen, as cybercrime is the fastest-growing crime in the U.S.. Knowing how to best position yourself before an attack happens is essential.

“More and more businesses and government agencies are engaging with independent security researchers to help them find vulnerabilities in their systems that they otherwise wouldn’t,” writes Alex Bekker, VP of engineering at HackerOne, “Most cyberattacks are executed via security holes unknown to the target organization, so having well-intentioned hackers find vulnerabilities in our computer systems is the closest we can get to real-world conditions.”

3. Most companies know about cyber threats, but aren’t doing much about it

“The hackers have done an excellent job of bringing the cybersecurity industry to the forefront, but how can we translate that into successfully helping corporations, governments and individuals defend themselves? The answer is rather simple: education,” writes Nick Espinosa, Chief Security Fanatic of Security Fanatics.

“Consider two major points in this vein: First, a recent study of global governments shows that while they’re aware of cyberthreats to their infrastructure, roughly 50% of said governments do not have a formal cyberdefense strategy or plan,” writes Espinosa. “Second, we have plenty of corporations and governments with vast amounts of intellectual property who continue to be behind in cyberdefense, using outdated strategies instead of the latest and greatest defense hardware, software and methodology. The ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ mentality is alive and well, sadly.”

4. Beware of another threat: biased security providers

As cybersecurity becomes non-optional, third-party vendors seem to be popping up out of the woodwork. They make big promises, but not all of them can deliver.

“Setting advanced testing standards would be an important step in codifying what is promised and delivered by various products,” writes Jamie Butler, CTO of Endgame, “Unfortunately, much of the available third-party testing organizations receive compensation for testing, which makes the results inherently biased. Instead, non-pay-to-play organizations like MITRE and the Cyber Independent Testing Lab need to become the norm.”

5. It’s not enough to plan against an attack, IT departments must plan for one as well

“No matter the extent and level of investment an organization puts into cyberthreat prevention, leadership must recognize a hard reality: It only takes one wrong click to invite an intrusion . Thus, a restorative approach (i.e., a well-equipped disaster recovery plan) is needed to ensure ongoing business in the event of a ransomware attack,” writes Jeffrey Ton, EVP of product and service development at Bluelock.

“It’s crucial for companies to ensure their restorative capabilities are just as strong, if not stronger, than their preventative measures in place. In every breach scenario, quick responsiveness avoids extensive data loss and reputational fallout,” writes Ton. “Achieving the creative and analytical tension for this type of resilience is just another reason for IT departments to shift their traditional approach.”

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‘Did you know your electronic health records can sell for as much as €40 on the dark web?’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

AS THE PERSONAL details of half of all Americans are stolen, Ronan Murphy asks how prepared is Ireland to face the €1.6 trillion cyber-threat? The breach at US credit reporting company Equifax is one of the biggest to date. Sometime in late July, cyber criminals infiltrated their supposedly secure system to steal…

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Practically all the relationships I know are based on ……

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Practically all the relationships I know are based on a foundation of lies and mutually accepted delusion.   Kim Cattrall The post Practically all the relationships I know are based on …… appeared first on Dating…

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What SMBs need to know about Russian hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

In June, a fast-moving global cyberattack was launched by a sophisticated piece of malicious software, now called Petna, seemed to come straight out of a Hollywood thriller. At one point, this malware was infecting 5,000 computers every ten minutes. The mystery of who sent it, and why, quickly deepened to…

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I prefer ordinary girls – you know, college students….

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ I prefer ordinary girls – you know, college students, waitresses, that sort of thing. Most of the girls I go out with are just good friends. Just because I go out to the cinema with a…

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Threat Hunting: Do Hackers Know Where You Are?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The internet is full of personal and business-sensitive information if you know where to look. In a previous post, we detailed our method of collecting Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) by “scraping” the content posted to public websites where stolen information is regularly released by hackers. That post focused on email…

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