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Data about inmates and jail staff spilled by leaky prison app – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Inmates’ and correctional facilities employees’ data has been sloshed onto the web, unencrypted and unsecured, in yet another instance of a misconfigured cloud storage bucket.

Security researchers at vpnMentor came across the leak on 3 January during a web-mapping project that was scanning a range of Amazon S3 addresses to look for open holes in systems.

The leaky bucket belongs to JailCore, a cloud-based app meant to manage correctional facilities, including by helping to ensure better compliance with insurance standards by doing things like tracking inmates’ medications and activities. That means that the app handles personally identifiable information (PII) that includes detainees’ names, mugshots, medication names, and behaviors: going to the lavatory, sleeping, pacing, or cursing, for example.

JailCore also tracks correctional officers’ names, sometimes their signatures, and their personally filled out observational reports on the detainees.

Some of the PII is meant to be freely available to the public: details such as detainee names, dates of birth and mugshots are already publicly available from most state or county websites within rosters of current inmates. But another portion of the data is not: that portion includes specific medication information and additional sensitive data, vpnMentor says, such as the PII of correctional officers.

JailCore closed down the data leak between 15 and 16 January: 10 or 11 days after vpnMentor notified it about the breach (and about the same time that the security firm reached out to the Pentagon about it). The company initially refused to accept vpnMentor’s disclosure findings, the firm said.