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Kiara Advani asked what she’d write in Sidharth Malhotra’s Tinder bio, her witty answer leaves co-stars Aditya Seal, Mallika Dua impressed – bollywood | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Actor Kiara Advani, who is rumoured to be dating Sidharth Malhotra, was asked what she’d write in his Tinder bio, if she had to make one for him. Her witty […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | hacker | Rogers’ vendor leaves database open

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A third-party service provider to Rogers Communications left open a database used for marketing purposes, exposing customer PII.

The Canadian telecom provider did not name the firm involved, nor the number of people affected, but reported that the incident was uncovered on Feb. 26, 2020 and involved the service provider leaving a database open to the public for an unspecified amount of time.

The third-party vendor, which handles promotional offer fulfillment for Rogers, exposed customer names, addresses, account numbers, email addresses and telephone numbers. No payment card information nor login credentials were involved.

The data that was exposed can cause a great deal of harm to its owners as cybercriminals can use it to create well-crafted phishing emails from which they may be able to extract even more valuable personal data.

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When it comes to #cybersecurity, everyone leaves their #virtual door #open

How many of you have taken the two-factor authentication seriously and enabled it for your gmail account? Or for your social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? Or for those websites that you have registered to shop online, pay utility bills or even book a cab? If you don’t remember doing it, it’s time to do it now.

According to a Google software engineer Grzegorz Milka, less than ten per cent of active gmail users – just one in ten people – are bothered to turn on two-factor authentication. This is a staggeringly low figure when one considers email accounts are the center of a digital web.

When people forget passwords for third-party services – such as social media, online shopping, and digital payment accounts – it is often their gmail account that serves as the recovery point. The fact that Google rolled out two-step authentication about seven years ago and yet the numbers are so low clearly explains that hardly anyone care to secure their social media platforms, which introduced this feature much later.

Your data is not just with banks or UIDAI or GSTN. Consumers store personal information on their smartphones putting themselves at risk in their day-to-day lives be it knowingly or unknowingly.

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The post When it comes to #cybersecurity, everyone leaves their #virtual door #open appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Mobile #networks #investigate flaw that leaves #4G #customers open to #hacking

Source: National Cyber Security News

Security researchers have discovered a set of severe vulnerabilities in 4G LTE protocol that could be exploited to spy on user phone calls and text messages, send fake emergency alerts, spoof location of the device and even knock devices entirely offline.
A new research paper [PDF] recently published by researchers at Purdue University and the University of Iowa details 10 new cyber attacks against the 4G LTE wireless data communications technology for mobile devices and data terminals.
The attacks exploit design weaknesses in three key protocol procedures of the 4G LTE network known as attach, detach, and paging.

Unlike many previous research, these aren’t just theoretical attacks. The researchers employed a systematic model-based adversarial testing approach, which they called LTEInspector, and were able to test 8 of the 10 attacks in a real testbed using SIM cards from four large US carriers.

Authentication Synchronization Failure Attack
Traceability Attack
Numb Attack
Authentication Relay Attack
Detach/Downgrade Attack
Paging Channel Hijacking Attack
Stealthy Kicking-off Attack
Panic Attack
Energy Depletion Attack
Linkability Attack

Among the above-listed attacks, researchers consider an authentication relay attack is particularly worrying, as it lets an attacker connect to a 4G LTE network by impersonating a victim’s phone number without any legitimate credentials.

This attack could not only allow a hacker to compromise the cellular network to read incoming and outgoing messages of the victims but also frame someone else for the crime.

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Identity theft leaves Securitas AB CEO bankrupt

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Alf Goransson, CEO, Securitas AB has become one of the highest profile victims of identity theft. The news broke yesterday when his employers announced that a court had declared Goransson bankrupt. For a listed company this sort of news would, typically, send its shares price into freefall. It didn’t. The…

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The Weird Loophole That Leaves Even Well-Secured Facebook Accounts Vulnerable

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Facebook’s security team does its best to protect users. But not all of those users have the same ideas about how to be protected. Facebook serves almost 2 billion users, more than a billion of them on a daily basis. Those users are spread out all […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Samsung Smart TV flaw leaves devices open to hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung Smart TV flaw leaves devices open to hackers

Your Samsung Smart TV might be pretty dumb.

Penetration testing firm Neseso has found that a 32-inch Tizen-based smart TV, first released as part of the 2015 model year and still being sold in North America, isn’t authenticating devices that connect to it via Wi-Fi Direct.

Rather than requiring a password or PIN to authenticate devices that want to connect to the TV – like, say, your smartphone when you want to use it as a remote control – it’s relying on a whitelist of devices that the user’s already authorized.

To do that, Samsung’s Smart TV uses devices’ media access control (MAC) addresses. Those are like a digital fingerprint: a MAC address is constant to a piece of hardware (though it can be spoofed, either for legitimate purposes or by a thief who wants to hide it).

Neseso says a user will be notified about a whitelist device that connects to their Smart TV, but that’s it: if the device is on a whitelist, the TV will just lay out the welcome mat without requiring any authentication.

It’s easy for an attacker to get a whitelisted MAC address, Neseso said. In fact, a few years ago, we saw a US cop sniffing out stolen gadgets by MAC addresses, wardriving in his squad car with some software he rigged up to a thumb drive sized-antenna that plugs into the car’s USB port and looking for MAC addresses that matched those listed in a database of known stolen devices.

After an attacker spoofs a known MAC address, they’d be able to access all the services on the Smart TV, such as remote control service.

An attacker would have to know, ahead of time, the MAC address of, say, your smartphone’s Wi-Fi chip. They’ll also likely have to crouch outside in your shrubbery – given that Wi-Fi Direct doesn’t work over long distances – while clutching their laptop or smartphone to spoof that MAC address and start messing with channel-changing or screen mirroring.

OK, so an attacker can change your channel. Annoying, but hardly earth-shattering, eh? Well, it doesn’t stop with the remote exploitation of channel-surfing. An attacker could use it as a springboard to gain access to whatever network the Smart TV is connected to, Neseso said.

Would an attacker be able to get at your home Wi-Fi network’s name and password? Not necessarily through this Wi-Fi Direct vulnerability. But as another security researcher revealed a few weeks ago, the operating system running on millions of Samsung products – it’s called Tizen – is what Motherboard referred to as a hacker’s dream.

Israeli researcher Amihai Neiderman:

Everything you can do wrong there, they do it. You can see that nobody with any understanding of security looked at this code or wrote it. It’s like taking an undergraduate and letting him program your software.
We’ve certainly heard of Samsung vulnerabilities before. In fact, last month, WikiLeaks published documents that purportedly showed how the CIA can monitor people through their Samsung Smart TVs.

Neseso contacted Samsung starting last month, with the Korean company eventually saying that it didn’t consider the find to be a security vulnerability. That’s why Neseso decided to publish details about it on Full Disclosure, it said.

The security outfit advised Samsung Smart TV owners to remove all their whitelisted devices and to avoid using the WiFi-Direct feature. It didn’t explain precisely how to do that, instead telling users to directly contact Samsung. You might want to poke around in the Network menu under Settings or simply disable Wi-Fi on your smart TV… though that would rob you of all those smart TV features you paid for.

Neseso didn’t test other Samsung models, but it suggested that they too might be vulnerable.

Short of disabling Wi-Fi, we’d suggest keeping an eye out for rustling shrubbery. If your TV channels start changing, call the police and then, by all means, switch off your TV’s Wi-Fi.

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Second Largest IoT Manufacturer Leaves Devices Open To Hacking

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

It appears cybercriminals are once again targeting a popular manufacturer of the internet of things hardware. Dahua, the world’s second-largest IoT device manufacturer, had to issue an emerging software patch to address a security flaw found in most of its …

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3 Last-Minute Things I Need To Teach My Kid Before He Leaves For College

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We are packing to take our 18-year-old son off to college at the end of this week. A small pile of “Don’t forget to pack!” items accumulating by the back door serves as a startling reminder that I have less than a week to tie up a few loose parenting ends before I send him out into the wide blue yonder we refer to as The Real World..

1. After We Pay Your Tuition, You Will Have More Money Than We Do

I’m so glad we had the “money talk” today.

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The post 3 Last-Minute Things I Need To Teach My Kid Before He Leaves For College appeared first on Parent Security Online.

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Boy Leaves Cold Drinks Out For Mailman Friend On Super Hot Day

This story oughtta deliver some smiles. 

Carmine McDaniel, 8, felt concerned for his mailman friend, Henry Bailey, who was working his route on a particularly hot day. So, the Newport News, Virginia boy decided to leave out a cooler full of water and Gatorade for Bailey to enjoy. 

 

The mailman’s reaction of pure joy and relief was caught on the family’s security camera. Carmine’s mother, Terra McDaniel, shared the short video on Facebook with the hope of encouraging people to see the value in life’s little, yet thoughtful, moments.

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