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Thursday: Vodafone trouble, clubhouse freedom, Windows & Linux loopholes | #linux | #linuxsecurity | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The flood disaster in western Germany and the associated climate change and its effects are still on everyone’s lips, but currently a lot is also about various security gaps in […]

The post Thursday: Vodafone trouble, clubhouse freedom, Windows & Linux loopholes | #linux | #linuxsecurity | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Pale Moon 29.3.0 – Neowin | #linux | #linuxsecurity | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Razvan SereaNews ReporterNeowin · Jul 20, 2021 00:36 EDT Pale Moon is an Open Source, Goanna-based web browser available for Microsoft Windows, Linux and Android, focusing on efficiency and ease […]

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#linuxsecurity | Thinking big: Nextcloud chief aims to overtake Office365 and GSuite

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The head of the open-source file syncing and sharing software company Nextcloud, which has been growing at a fast pace, has ambitions to overtake proprietary services like Office 365 and Google GSuite.

Founder and chief executive Frank Karlitschek told iTWire that, given these plans, the forthcoming Nextcloud releases would see big improvements in productivity, collaboration, communications, scalability and security.

Nextcloud was started as a breakaway from another company, ownCloud, that Karlitschek himself started in 2010. Asked about the split, which occurred in 2016, he said he did not want to dwell on the reasons for the break-up, but said: “At the end of the day the complete set-up of the old company was wrong. [It had] the wrong management, investors, product focus and strategy.

“With Nextcloud we were lucky to fix these issues so that Nextcloud is on a lot better track now. And the results proves us right which makes the full team happy and proud.” He added that while he still had friends at ownCloud, when it came to business the two companies were competitors.

Karlitschek has been a contributor to open source software for a long time and has also been on the board of KDE, the first full-fledged desktop environment for Linux users.

However, he says that this experience has not helped him negotiate deals with German and other European companies. “KDE is not a business and doesn’t do negotiations with customers. But I learned a lot for KDE how to run a real big, and successful open source project and product. I believe that the Open Source development model is superior in innovation, speed, creativity and security compared to the classic proprietary model.”

Apart from his KDE experience, Karlitschek has managed engineering teams for more than two decades and also worked as head of unit and managing director at different Internet companies. In 2001 he created the openDesktop.org social network as well as GTK-Apps.org, GNOME-Look.org, KDE-Apps.org and other ‘AppStores’ before AppStores existed.

He attributed Nextcloud’s progress over the three years of its existence to its employees. “The reason is that we as a company have a focus on hiring only the best people,” he said.

“We have a shared vision and mission that goes beyond the normal ‘making money’. And we work a lot better with the community and with partners. And there is a clearer strategy for the product. This all results in a great momentum and high development speed.”

Karlitschek agreed that there was a mystique about cloud computing when in reality it was just someone else’s computer. “This is an interesting challenge. For a lot of people this kind of cloud services are completely abstract and magical,” he said.

“They don’t realise that this is software running somewhere by people. There is a lot of education and communication needed to explain how the cloud world really works. And I expect there will be more and more privacy violations and data breaches on this big cloud services in the future. This will make it clearer that the current centralized services are not a good idea and the future belongs do decentralised solutions like Nextcloud.”

No shrinking violet when it comes to plugging his own firm, Karlitschek said while Nextcloud had competitors like Seafile, Pydio and others, “it is safe to say that Nextcloud is the most advanced solution with the biggest momentum. Our only real competition in the market is Office365, over which we have the unique advantage of being on-premises”.

Karlitschek has a number of other feathers in his cap: he was an invited expert at the W3C to help to create the ActivityPub standard. He has spoken at MIT, CERN, Harvard and ETH and keynoted LinuxCon, Latinoware, FOSSASIA, Campus Party and many other conferences. He is also a fellow of Open Forum Europe and an adviser to the United Nations.

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#linuxsecurity | Is Linux Really Immune to Viruses and Malware? Here’s the Truth

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

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One reason people switch to Linux is to have better security. Once you switch to Linux, the thinking goes, you no longer have to worry about viruses and other types of malware. But while this is largely true in practice, desktop Linux isn’t actually all that secure.

If a virus wants to wreck shop on your free and open source desktop, there’s a good chance that it can.

Why Malware Is Less Common on Linux Desktops

Image Credit: Kevin Horvat/Unsplash

Malware is unwanted code that somehow made its way onto your computer in order to perform functions designed with malicious intent. Sometimes these programs slow down a machine or cause it to crash entirely. The creators may then demand a ransom in order to fix the machine.

Sometimes malware uploads information to remote servers, giving someone access to your saved data or vital credentials that you type, such as passwords and credit card numbers.

People tend to create malware for Windows because that’s the operating system found on the most PCs. This increases the odds that a virus will spread from one computer to another.

Virus makers tend to target less technical users that are easier to fool with bogus web banners and phishing scams. Viruses also spread among people who know how to pirate music and TV shows but don’t understand how these files may be infected.

There are antivirus programs for Linux


The 6 Best Free Linux Antivirus Programs




The 6 Best Free Linux Antivirus Programs

Think Linux doesn’t need antivirus? Think again. These free antivirus tools can ensure your Linux box remains virus-free.
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, but even their purpose is often to help protect Windows users.

Linux Desktop Malware Exists, But It’s Rare

One piece of malware has recently made news for targeting the Linux desktop. EvilGNOME runs on the GNOME desktop environment by pretending to be an extension.

GNOME is the most common Linux desktop environment


GNOME Explained: A Look at One of Linux’s Most Popular Desktops




GNOME Explained: A Look at One of Linux’s Most Popular Desktops

You’re interested in Linux, and you’ve come across “GNOME”, an acronym for GNU Network Object Model Environment. GNOME is one of the most popular open source interfaces, but what does that mean?
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, found as the default interface on two of the most popular Linux distros, Ubuntu and Fedora, and on computers that ship directly from Linux manufacturers such as System76 and Purism. Legitimate extensions allow you to alter many aspects of the GNOME desktop.

The malware known as EvilGNOME is able to take screenshots and record audio from your PC’s microphone. It can also upload your personal files. A more detailed breakdown is available in a report by Intezer Labs, who gave EvilGNOME its name.

This malware didn’t attract attention for being particularly likely to impact large numbers of people. It was considered newsworthy because it existed at all.

Most Linux Malware Targets Servers

A datacenter room with server racks
Image Credit: Taylor Vick/Unsplash

Linux is relatively rare on desktops, but it’s the most prominent operating system found on servers powering the web and managing much of the world’s digital infrastructure.

Many attacks target websites rather than PCs. Hackers often look for vulnerabilities in network daemons that they can use to gain access to Linux-powered servers. Some will install a malicious script on a server that then targets visitors rather than the system itself.

Hacking Linux-powered machines, whether they are servers or IoT devices, is one way to go about infecting the web or creating botnets.

Linux’s Design Is Not Inherently Secure

Desktop Linux in its current form is hardly a fortress. Compared to Windows XP, where malicious software could gain administrator access without prompting for a password, Linux offered much better security. These days, Microsoft has made changes to close that gap. Since Vista, Windows has issued a prompt.

Yet fretting about the security of system files almost misses the point. Most of the data we care about isn’t saved in our root system folders. It’s the personal data in our home directory that’s irreplaceable and most revealing. Software on Linux, malicious or otherwise, doesn’t need your password to access this data and share it with others.

User accounts can also run scripts that activate your microphone, turn on your webcam, log key presses, and record what happens onscreen.

In other words, it almost doesn’t matter how secure the Linux kernel is, or the safeguards surrounding various system components, if it’s the vulnerabilities in apps and the desktop environment that can put the data you care most about at risk.

EvilGNOME doesn’t install itself among your system files. It lurks in a hidden folder in your home directory. On the positive side, that makes it easier to remove. But you have to first know it’s there.

4 Reasons Why Linux Relatively Safe to Use

While Linux isn’t immune to exploits, in day-to-day use, it still provides a much safer environment than Windows. Here are a few reasons why.

1. Multiple Distros, Environments, and System Components

App developers have a hard time developing for Linux because there are so many versions to support. The same challenge faces malware creators. What’s the best way to infiltrate someone’s computer? Do you sneak code in the DEB or RPM format?

You may try to exploit a vulnerability in the Xorg display server or in a particular window compositor, only to find that users have something else installed.

2. App Stores and Package Managers Shield Linux Users

Traditional Linux package management systems put app maintainers and reviewers between users and their software source. As long as you get all of your software from these trusted sources, you’re very unlikely to run into anything malicious.

Avoid copying and pasting command line instructions to install software, especially when you don’t know exactly what the command is doing and you’re unsure of the source.

3. Newer Technologies Actively Consider Security

New app formats like Flatpak and Snap introduce permissions and sandboxing, limiting what apps can access. The new Wayland display server can prevents apps from taking screenshots or recording happens onscreen, making it harder to exploit.

4. The Source Code Is Open for Anyone to Read

The primary advantage of Linux comes from being able to view the code. Since Linux is open source rather than proprietary, you don’t have to worry about the desktop itself working against you, acting as spyware itself or suffering from exploits that haven’t been disclosed for commercial reasons.

Even if you can’t make sense of the code, you can read the blog posts or reports by someone that does.

Should You Be Afraid of Linux Malware?

It’s a myth that Linux users don’t have to worry about viruses, but if you stick to your distro’s app stores or other trusted sources such as Flathub, you’re unlikely to stumble across anything dangerous.

No matter which operating system you use, it’s important that you adopt safe digital habits. Don’t make the mistake of believing that switching to Linux means you can download from sketchy sites without concern.

Yet for most of us, the biggest risk probably isn’t malware. If you’ve created a large number of online accounts or depend on cloud services, phishing scams are a much larger threat


How to Spot a Phishing Email




How to Spot a Phishing Email

Catching a phishing email is tough! Scammers pose as PayPal or Amazon, trying to steal your password and credit card information, are their deception is almost perfect. We show you how to spot the fraud.
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to your data, whether or not you use Linux.

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The post #linuxsecurity | Is Linux Really Immune to Viruses and Malware? Here’s the Truth appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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