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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | DCC UK second-gen smart meter network passes three million mark

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Smart DCC, the licence-holder building and managing the secure national infrastructure that underpins the roll-out of smart meters across the UK, has passed a milestone in its network capability, with the three millionth second-generation smart meter (SMETS2) attached to its smart network. The Capita subsidiary was […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked

Want to delete that embarrassing message you just sent? WhatsApp will let you, and so will Instagram — but if you’re using Facebook, then you’re out of luck.

Unless you’re Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO and cofounder of Facebook.

TechCrunch reported Thursday that some old messages sent by Zuckerberg and senior executives have disappeared from recipients’ Facebook Messenger inboxes, proven by the original email receipts sent at the time.

The company appeared to confirm the unique arrangement, telling TechCrunch the change was made in response to an uptick in hacking.

“After Sony Pictures’ emails were hacked in 2014 we made a number of changes to protect our executives’ communications. These included limiting the retention period for Mark’s messages in Messenger. We did so in full compliance with our legal obligations to preserve messages,” the company said.

The Sony hack targeted the emails of Sony film executives, which revealed a side of Hollywood rarely seen by outsiders, and the decision to name the event as a catalyst for Facebook’s message purge indicates how troubling the incident was in Silicon Valley — and that Facebook was concerned about being hacked.

The company also raised the idea of a “retention period,” though there is no such thing for normal users. If a user long presses a private message on Facebook a “Delete Message” pop up confirms that the function will “delete your copy of the message,” and the recipients’ copy will remain.

Facebook-owned Instagram has long had the option to “unsend” direct messages, while Facebook-owned WhatsApp recently launched a deletion function where unread messages can be deleted “for everyone.” A message is then displayed to all participants that content has been deleted.

But Zuckerberg’s deleted messages didn’t leave behind any such message, probably because they had already been read, many years ago.

The messages were originally sent to former employees and people outside of Facebook. According to TechCrunch, the recipients of the now-deleted messages were not informed at any stage that correspondence they received had been erased.

Zuckerberg may be the CEO of Facebook, but it’s unclear how the decision to remove senior executives’ messages would be allowed under the company’s terms of service. The terms only allow Facebook to remove content if the company believes “that it violates this Statement or our policies” or for infringing copyright.

Deleting messages quietly, and selectively, also appears to fly in the face of Facebook’s campaign to “make the world more open and transparent.” Its own policies say that the company “should publicly make available information about its purpose, plans, policies, and operations.”

Facebook appears to have not followed these policies in this instance, and it raises questions about the recipient’s right to privacy.

The news comes just weeks after the Cambridge Analytica scandal which has seen Zuckerberg admit that tens of millions of users probably had their data scraped.

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The post Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Ex-teacher Mark Frost admits two decades of child abuse

A retired teacher who abused children for decades both in the UK and abroad has admitted 45 sex offences in one of the worst cases to come to court.

Mark Frost, known as Andrew Tracey, pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey to a catalogue of abuse against nine children in Thailand between 2009 and 2012.

After the allegations emerged in Asia, two former pupils of a school in Worcestershire came forward claiming they too were sexually assaulted by the English teacher in the 1990s.

Frost, now 70, had sex with one of the boys in a school store room, at his home where he lived with his adopted son, and in a car park in Woking.

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The post Ex-teacher Mark Frost admits two decades of child abuse appeared first on Parent Security Online.

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Mark Zuckerberg’s covering of laptop camera, mic helps prevent hack attacks

mark-zuckerberg

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg posted a photo to his social media account celebrating half a billion monthly users for Facebook-owned Instagram. A Twitter user noticed that the camera and microphone jack of the Facebook co-founder’s laptop seemed to be covered up with tape. Various media outlets questioned whether it was a case of paranoia or […]

The post Mark Zuckerberg’s covering of laptop camera, mic helps prevent hack attacks appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals

Cyber-criminals are hacking into corporate computer systems and using the public profiles of top executives to fine-tune email scams that are duping Canadians out of hundreds of millions of dollars each year, a CBC News investigation has discovered. “It came on the scene in a massive way, from virtually nothing to $19 million in 2014” in losses reported, said Daniel Williams of the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, a federal government agency. He also says that research by the CAFC and police suggests that less than three per cent of these email scams ever gets reported, meaning the incidents and the losses are probably much higher. “Most probably in the range of $500 million to $1 billion,” Williams says. “It’s big, big money. It’s very organized, very sophisticated crime groups with a lot of resources putting a lot of effort … really on an industrial scale.” Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/ransomware-cyber-scams-bogus-emails-1.3314221

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The post Ransomware, bogus emails from your ‘boss’ mark growing skill of cyber-criminals appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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