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How to #Know If Your #Slow #Computer Is #Secretly #Mining #Cryptocurrency

Mining cryptocurrency used to require thousands of dollars worth of equipment to see any kind of meaningful return, but not anymore. Newer digital currencies like Monero, ByteCoin, and AEON have given would-be miners the ability to mine tokens right from their laptops. This might benefit small-time miners that want to get involved in the sector, but for every good thing online there are always people that figure out a way to use it for bad.

Hackers have begun using these tools to infect computers and websites to secretly mine cryptocurrencies. This emerging type of malware attack has been dubbed as “cryptojacking”, and it could cause your computer to overheat and crash. Luckily, spotting these hidden miners isn’t all that difficult.

Cryptojacking essentially hijacks your computer’s CPU power to mine. This means when you’re browsing the web, the malware is running in the background completely unbeknownst to you. There are a few types of this malware, and some run only when you visit a certain website and others can be maliciously installed on your computer. The best way to prevent this is by using antivirus software and adblockers.

If you’ve already been hit with this kind of malware, you’ll notice either your computer acting sluggish, getting warmer than usual, or its fan constantly spinning. If you aren’t running any kind of demanding software, like video games or video editing programs, this should be the first hint that your computer is working overtime.

If you’ve noticed your laptop acting up, it’s time to go check on what’s going on under the hood. Mac users can view a detailed breakdown of everything their computer is running by searching “Activity Monitor” and using the magnifying glass icon at the top-right of the screen. Windows users can simply hold down the Ctrl-Alt-Del keys to bring up “Task Manager.”

Both of these menus will display a graph of how much of your computer’s processing power is being used. Any massive spikes should be red flags. You’ll also see an ordered list of the programs using the most processing power at the moment. Before ending any of these programs be sure to research what they are, as you could be ending a crucial part of your operating system.

Both Tesla and the Los Angeles Times have had their sites infected by cryptojacking software. Companies with popular websites are the most at risk, as hackers can embed code onto their servers and use the CPU power of everyone who visits the site. But making it a habit to check on how your computer is running will ensure your device isn’t getting used to make someone else a crypto fortune.

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7th International Workshops on Database and Data Mining (ICDDM)

General Cybersecurity Conference

 June 27 – 29, 2018 | Chongqing, China

Cybersecurity Conference Description 

In today’s information society, we witness an explosive growth of the amount of information becoming available in electronic form and stored in large databases. . For example, many companies operate huge data warehouses collecting many different types of information about their customers. As the workshops of ICIVC conference, ICDDM is for presenting novel and fundamental advances in the fields of Database and Data Mining. It also serves to foster communication among researchers and practitioners working in a wide variety of scientific areas with a common interest in improving Database and Data Mining related techniques.

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Coin #mining #hacking attacks #rose 8,500% in #2017

So called criminal ‘coin miners’ are taking control of our computers, mobiles and ‘Internet-of-Things’ devices to turn them into crypto-mining slaves

This is getting scary. Cybersecurity software company Symantec says the use of criminal “coin miners” jumped by 8,500% during 2017. A coin miner is a file or script that unknowingly steals a victim’s computer processing power or cloud CPU usage to mine cryptocurrencies.

Symantec said in its annual Internet Security Threat Report that the meteoric rise in the crypto currency market has “triggered a gold rush for cyber criminals.” Coin mining, says Symantec, slows devices, overheats batteries and, for businesses, can shutdown corporate cloud networks. Symantec says it logged 1.7 million such attacks in December alone.

“The barrier to entry for coin mining is pretty low – potentially only requiring a couple of lines of code to operate – and coin mining can allow criminals to fly under the radar in a way that is not possible with other types of cybercrime,” reports Symantec. “Victims may not even realize a coin miner is slurping their computer’s power as the only impact may be a slowdown of their device that they could easily attribute to something else.”

While malicious coin miners appear to primarily target computers, mobile phones are also vulnerable. But it is with Internet of Things (IoT) devices that Symantec is seeing the largest potential for criminal growth. During 2017, there was a 600% increase in such IoT attacks, but as malicious coin mining evolves, cyber criminals could exploit the connected nature of these devices to mine “en masse.”

Maybe it’s time to take that kettle offline and go back to gas?

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BlackBerry #Mobile site the #latest #target of #cryptocurrency mining #hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

TCL Communication Technology Holding Ltd., the operator of the BlackBerry Mobile site, is the latest victim of cryptocurrency-loving hackers in the latest of a rash of cryptomining hijacking cases.

The website for BlackBerry Mobile was discovered by a Reddit user last week to be serving up code to visitors from Coinhive, the notorious Monero mining script service. The same person who discovered the code did note that it was only the global TCL- owned Blackberrymobile.com site that was affected, not country-specific sites or those owned by BlackBerry Ltd.

Coinhive itself chimed in on Reddit, saying that one of its users had hacked the Blackberry Mobile website using a vulnerability in the Magento webshop software. “We’re sorry to hear that our service has been misused,” the company said. “This specific user seems to have exploited a security issue in the Magento webshop software (and possibly others) and hacked a number of different sites. We have terminated the account in question for violating our terms of service now.”

TCL is far from the first company to be targeted by cryptomining code, and it won’t be the last. The first outbreaks of cryptomining-related hacking occurred in September, when The Pirate Bay and then Showtime were exposed as using the method. As cryptocurrencies boomed, so instances of hackers and site owners trying to cash in on Monero mining. A RiskIQ report Sept. 26 found that more than 1,000 sites were now hijacking the computing power of site visitors to mine for cryptocurrencies.

By October, leading content delivery network Cloudflare Inc. was the first major provider to crack down on the method, banning all sites from its network that have cryptocurrency mining code installed.

The method spread to apps later the same month, when the first reports emerged of Coinhive scripts appearing in Android apps, and the new attack vector has seemingly continued to grow. Only this weekend, a security researcher discovered 291 apps across third-party Android stores that included the miming code, although they appear to be the same app and code with 291 different names.

Commenting on the Android outbreak, HackRead noted that though the biggest victims of cryptocurrency miners were previously website owners and unsuspecting visitors, now Android users are also at risk. The advice, as always, is to practice safe internet: Do not download unknown apps from Android stores, make sure they have up-to-date antivirus software installed and keep an eye on their processor usage because cryptocurrency miners trigger high usage.

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Copy-Pasting Malware Dev Made $63,000 From Mining Monero on IIS Servers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A malware author (or authors) has made around $63,000 during the past five months by hacking unpatched IIS 6.0 servers and mining Monero. ESET researchers just recently uncovered the attacker’s operation. Experts say the malware author used CVE-2017-7269, a vulnerability in IIS 6.0 servers to take over vulnerable machines and…

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North Korea may be mining bitcoin in addition to hacking it

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Last month, North Korea was banned from exporting coal to China, its biggest buyer. The rogue regime may have found a new use for these idle coal supplies: powering bitcoin mines. That’s according to research by Recorded Future, an information security firm that counts the Central Intelligence Agency’s venture capital arm among its…

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Hacked Synology NAS systems used in big-profit cryptocurrency mining scheme

A hacker exploited publicly known vulnerabilities to install malware on NAS systems made by Synology and used their computing power to generate Dogecoins, a type of cryptocurrency. View full post on Computerworld Cybercrime and Hacking News ________________ Other Sites You May Like: http;//AmIHackerProof.com – http://hackerforhire.com – Read More….

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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