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#deepweb | Has Samsung learned from their Galaxy Fold bendy mistakes?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Dreaming deep, sound asleep

As machines become increasingly intelligent, they are also becoming more artistic.

Google’s Deep Dream is making a huge splash on the web. It was originally coded by Alexander Mordvintsev, a programmer working in security systems who liked to play around with artificial intelligence as a side project. In the middle of the night last May, he discovered the lines of code that would cause Google’s neural net to generate original images that look like a psychedelic combination of Salvador Dalí and Lisa Frank. He posted his images on Google’s internal Google + account, and was soon paired with young programmer Chris Olah and software engineer/sculptor Mike Tyka to develop Deep Dream.

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REM for your RAM

The Deep Dream team has created an entire gallery of surrealistic art. Animal parts of different species combine to form fantastical beasts, backgrounds fill with swirling patterns, and spiders emerge from cloudless skies.

In July, the Deep Dream team released the software on GitHub so that the general public could turn their family portraits and vacation photos into bizarre art pieces. New apps are popping up, several grotesque portraits of presidential candidates have been produced, and the band Wilco used a Deep Dream image on the cover of its latest album. Samim Winiger, who created software that makes animations from Deep Dream images, says that “in five years we won’t recognize Photoshop,” alluding to the possibility for Deep Dream technology to become a major feature in our visual world.

But is there more to it?

Winiger refers to Deep Dream as “creative AI [artificial intelligence].” But can a computer be said to have creativity? The dreamlike (or, at times, nightmarish) quality of Deep Dream images has certainly caused some observers to posit that Deep Dream is pulling images from the “subconscious” of Google’s mind. But a computer, no matter how smart, is not a brain. So is Deep Dream just the robot equivalent of a cool party trick?

Deep learning in the neural net

But Deep Dream wasn’t created just to blow our minds with freakish four-eyed kittens and giant tarantulas crawling from the sky. It’s also a useful way for programmers to study artificial intelligence. Computers can now achieve what programmers call “deep learning” by processing information through a neural net (NN). Neural nets are meshes of artificial neurons layered one over the other, like spider webs. Information is passed through several layers of the NN, and each layer analyzes it from a different angle. The topmost layer is responsible for the output of information that has been “learned” by deeper layers of the net.

Google has made great strides towards teaching its neural net to visually recognize objects by having it produce an image of whatever it’s viewing, which is then graded for accuracy and fed back into the computer, giving the NN an opportunity to learn from its mistakes and eventually come to automatically correct itself.

Layered learning, and pattern detecting

So far, it has been hard for researchers to really know for sure what is happening at each layer of the neural net. But a researcher can have a computer produce a Deep Dream image from a specific layer of its neural net, thus revealing exactly what that layer is learning. In this way, researchers are discovering more about what happens inside an artificial mind.

What researchers have found is that computers may have higher perception and better pattern-recognition than humans. It’s like having a highly imaginative child watch clouds. If a cloud looks a little bit like a ship, the neural net will run the image through a feedback loop until a highly detailed ship emerges. This is why Deep Dream is able to create images even out of random noise – it can detect patterns that a human wouldn’t even notice.

This has far-reaching implications for how artificial intelligence may eventually replace humans. For example, researchers are using neural nets to read ultrasounds, detecting tumors invisible to the human eye.

Final thoughts

So, is artificial intelligence becoming creative? Is a computer an artist? That depends on how you define creativity, and where you draw the line between the “real” and the “artificial.” But Deep Dream engineer Mike Tyka is impressed: “If you think about human creativity, some small component of that is the ability to take impressions and recombine them in interesting, unexpected ways,” – the same ability Deep Dream displays.

Regardless of whether or not this is true “creativity,” the world seems to agree with Tyka that when you let a computer come up with original art, “it’s cool.”

Steven Levy was granted the first interview with the Deep Dream team. You can read his report at Medium.com.

#DeepDream

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EVEN #ELITE #HACKERS MAKE #DUMB #MISTAKES

A report from the Daily Beast alleged that the Guccifer 2.0 hacking persona—famous for leaking data stolen from the Democratic National Committee in 2016—has been linked to a GRU Russian intelligence agent. What appears to have given Guccifer away: The hacker once failed activate a VPN before logging into a social media account. This slip eventually allowed US investigators to link the persona to a Moscow IP address. In fact, they traced it directly to GRU headquarters.

Guccifer 2.0 took careful precautions to remain anonymous for months, yet one small mistake may have blown the whole cover. Such a gaffe may seem unthinkable for such a prominent and seemingly powerful hacker, but security experts note that, as the truism goes, everyone makes mistakes. And anyone who has worried about operations security, the process of limiting what information an outside party can discover, knows that you can’t rely on being perfect.

“It’s really easy for a hacker to slip up even if they’ve perfected their tradecraft,” says David Kennedy, CEO of the security firm TrustedSec, who formerly worked at the NSA and with the Marine Corps’ signal intelligence unit. “It happens all the time even to the most skilled of attackers, because it only takes one packet that an attacker didn’t think about or data that wasn’t intended to go to a certain destination to find its source.”

Cyber Goofs

From the outside, the faceless world of cyber espionage and digital nation-state aggression has an air of drama and mystery. Personas like Guccifer 2.0 or so-called Advanced Persistent Threat hacking groups have a certain mystique that makes their capers even more disconcerting, like being under attack from a phantom. But in practice it’s easy to see that the work isn’t glamorous at all, and that the individuals behind it are, of course, regular people. Who screw up.

Though it may feel surprising every time, elite hackers regularly make crucial opsec mistakes. North Korean hackers accidentally exposed their IP addresses during their attack on Sony Pictures in 2015. Investigators traced two of the founders of the dark web marketplace Silk Road simply because both men used their personal email addresses to establish accounts related to the project. And researchers at the Russian antivirus firm Kasperksy Labs exposed evidencein 2015 of an elite hacking group tied to the NSA, after the group accidentally let some IP addresses it owned expire, allowing Kaspersky to buy them and track malware that phoned home to them.

In spite of their insuperable aura, black hat hackers don’t all need to be at the very pinnacle of their field. Different skill levels suffice for different projects, and the goal is generally to do the minimum required and save resources rather than making everything completely watertight. Bad actors of all levels use slapdash code, open source tools, and sloppy methods if they’ll get a job done.

“A key point when people talk about ‘groups’ is that in a lot of cases, operators are not always going to know exactly what they’re doing or how things work, regardless of how advanced the tooling is,” says Will Strafach, a mobile security researcher and the president of Sudo Security Group.

StopSec

Though missteps can be damaging to offensive operations, attempting to avoid gaffes is just as crucial when people are using operations security best practices to defend themselves or others and use information control as a form of protection. For a survivor fleeing an abuser, a political dissident, or an activist, the cost of small mistakes can be enormous. But high-profile examples of the types of mistakes that can occur can serve as teachable anecdotes for those seeking to defend themselves.

“There are some situations for journalists/activists/human rights defenders where the stakes are high,” says Eva Gelperin, the director of cybersecurity at the digital rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation. “Telling people that they always need to have perfect opsec all the time is not very helpful. I’m hoping to use the Guccifer 2.0 story [in trainings] to make the point that you don’t have to protect everything from everyone all the time, but you do need to identify high-risk behavior with potentially catastrophic consequences and be disciplined about avoiding it.”

And though human error is ubiquitous, experts note that it’s important to stay vigilant about the possibility that a slip up is actually a false flag, and is intentionally misleading observers and investigators. “We all know we make mistakes, but I think there is a ton of skepticism on if Guccifer 2.0 really slipped up or not,” TrustedSec’s Kennedy notes. “It’s absolutely possible, but when dealing with a nation state whose entire goal is espionage it’s always hard to tell.”

Celebrity hacking personas don’t deserve too much credit, given that cyberespionage and hacking operations inevitably lead to high-profile blunders at times. But don’t give them too little credit either over mistakes that can and do happen to anyone.

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Hackers #stole $172 #billion last #year: #Consumers should #avoid these #mistakes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Online hackers made out like true bandits in 2017, stealing over $172 billion from people in 20 countries around the world, a new report said.

Norton Cyber Security released its annual insights report and found that 44% of consumers were affected by a cybercrime in the last 12 months with an average victim losing $142.

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3 Mistakes Never To Make When Evaluating Cybersecurity

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Over the past decade, the cybersecurity market has exploded, and growth remains brisk. Cybersecurity Ventures expects that the cybersecurity spending globally will reach $1 trillion by 2021, up from an estimated $120 billion this year. Despite this increased spending on security products and services, when it comes to protecting their…

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Hackers learn from their mistakes — why can’t we?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

It was only two months ago that the WannaCry ransomware attack hit global computers, creating headlines that warned everyone to update their computers and avoid risky online behaviour. Anyone, and that included companies, who failed to do so was at risk of losing any data stored on their computers. Panic…

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Budget’s cybersecurity allocations welcomed as government focuses on fixing past mistakes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Budget’s cybersecurity allocations welcomed as government focuses on fixing past mistakes

After a year in which Budget allocations focused on cybersecurity industry and capability development, that industry has cautiously welcomed the more targeted funding announced as the Turnbull government uses this week’s federal Budget for 2017-18 to respond to a series of government IT-security disasters. Industry enthusiasm focused on the $10.7m allocation, over the next four years, for the creation of …

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TOP TEN ONLINE DATING PROFILE MISTAKES

Ahh, dating, that most antiquated of human rituals. He plays coy. She plays hard to get. Will they or won’t they? On and on the dance goes. Where it stops, nobody knows. But perhaps you aren’t one to belly up to the bar, watering hole, or other public gathering place in order to seek a mate. Perhaps you prefer to sign up for one of those websites that includes a veritable meat market catalog of eligible bachelors and bachelorettes. Read More…. View full post on Dating Scams 101

The Power of Mistakes: Creating a Classroom Environment

Students and adults are afraid to make mistakes. This is a shame because some of the best discoveries and inventions come from failures! Mistakes lead to creativity, original thought, and ideas. In order to promote […]

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#pso #htcs #b4inc

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Experts weigh in on eight biggest dating mistakes

If you’re single, over 50 and ready to mingle, you’re hardly alone: There are millions of unmarried Americans age 50 and older. But are you sabotaging your own efforts at finding love in the dating pool? We talked to dating and relationship experts all over the country to find out the most common dating mistakes people over 50 make. Read More….

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The most common online dating mistakes and why women should act first

Online dating is part of the norm nowadays, and while there are a litany of different apps and websites to choose from, the rules are pretty much standard. Read More….

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