#onlinedating

now browsing by tag

 
 

#onlinedating | Politics have become a deal-breaker in many relationships | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

<p>The fallout from COVID-19 confronts graduating college seniors with a stark economic reality which, sadly, no amount of inspirational commencement speeches can undo. Across-the-board hiring freezes are common, and many summer internships, which serve the critical role of integrating young professionals into the workplace, are postponed or cancelled. Similar to the financial crash of 2008, students’ professional mettle will be tested.</p><p>Yet I am hopeful that the seeds of opportunity were planted years ago, and that we are seeing some green shoots. What specifically do I mean? In 2016, long before COVID-19 disrupted the economy, I founded the company <a href=”https://www.parkerdewey.com/” target=”_blank”>Parker Dewey</a>—named after Francis Parker and John Dewey, the “founding fathers” of experiential learning—to help fix the broken entry-level hiring system. The traditional ways to identify, assess, and hire college students and recent graduates for full-time roles is ineffective, resulting in approximately 45% of recent college graduates being <a href=”https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/college-labor-market/college-labor-market_underemployment_rates.html” target=”_blank”>under</a> or <a href=”https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/college-labor-market/college-labor-market_unemployment.html” target=”_blank”>unemployed</a>. Employers, who spend enormous time and effort hiring new college graduates, <a href=”https://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsyth.t03.htm” target=”_blank”>see most leave before the one-year mark</a>. </p><p>Typically, it goes like this: a job opening is posted online, hundreds of people apply instantly, narrowing the applicant field becomes a near-impossible task, and an interviewer eventually glances at a resume before asking questions that won’t substitute for seeing a job candidate in action.</p>

<p>We designed Parker Dewey to fix that by connecting college students and recent graduates—we call them Career Launchers—with specific projects from some of the nation’s most sought-after employers, and those that may be “under the radar.” Since launching, we’ve partnered with firms ranging from start-ups to those in the Fortune 100, which use our proprietary platform to provide these “micro-internship” opportunities. These mutually beneficial experiences allow both the Career Launcher and the company to test-drive each other before a full-time role is offered or filled.</p><p>In addition, micro-internships allow college students to better hone and demonstrate those “core skills” most valued by employers such as communication, adaptability, problem solving, and grit. While these skills are a key component of a post-secondary curriculum, rarely do students (or employers) appreciate the crosswalks from classroom to career, especially in classes that don’t sound like a job title.</p>

<blockquote>Right now, 55% of college graduates leave a full-time roll before completing a full year.</blockquote>

<p>Micro-internships provide professional opportunities that many Career Launchers would lack in a world of typical internships alone, which require a 10- or 12-week commitment, cannot be completed remotely, and are often unpaid. Traditional summer internships are inaccessible to students who work while earning their degree, who need flexible scheduling, and even student-athletes who compete and train while their peers explore careers. As a direct result of the uncertainty brought on by COVID-19, more employers are recognizing the need for more flexible opportunities to attract, assess, and hire Career Launchers.</p><p>Some of the <a href=”https://www.parkerdewey.com/example-projects” target=”_blank”>typical projects available</a> on <a href=”https://app.parkerdewey.com/auth/talent/sign-up” target=”_blank”>Parker Dewey’s platform</a> include creating a social media editorial calendar, drafting a press release form, wireframing a fitness app, editing an independent film, and creating digital “vaults” for financial investors—plus many more.</p><p>Each project has a thorough description, start date, end date, estimated number of hours to completion, and the amount the Career Launcher will be paid. We are fully integrated with LinkedIn, so creating a professional profile on the Parker Dewey platform is easy, and we eliminate the problem of applicant deluge by matching individuals with companies when each side shows a mutual interest in each other.</p>

<p>Beyond providing all types of students with access to employment, micro-internships have been described as “job dating,” and while we didn’t model the platform on dating apps, I can definitely see the parallel. I think companies and potential employees should “date” each other before making the engagement-like commitment of an internship, or the marriage of a full-time role. Right now, 55% of college graduates leave a full-time roll before completing a full year.</p><p>When I was fresh out of undergrad as an accounting major, I was hired by a big accounting firm for what was supposed to be my dream job. But I knew after one week it wasn’t what I wanted. Without a platform to showcase my skills to companies in other industries, or explore other pathways, I was a fresh-water fish in the salty accounting seas. In this time of economic uncertainty, Parker Dewey connects Career Launchers with paying projects from top employers, while giving each side time to learn more about each other. That’s a win-win we could all use right now. <a href=”https://app.parkerdewey.com/auth/talent/sign-up” target=”_blank”>You can create your profile now</a> to get instant access to industry-leading micro-internships.</p>

.  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .  .  .   .  .

Source link

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The post #onlinedating | Politics have become a deal-breaker in many relationships | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#onlinedating | Love Island’s Curtis Pritchard admits he cannot face dating again following split from Maura Higgins | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Curtis Pritchard admits that he cannot face dating again following his messy split from Maura Higgins.

The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows.  

Speaking to The Sun about the split, Curtis said: ‘It hurt. I wasn’t ready for everyone to know we had split up — I wanted some time.

Candid: Curtis Pritchard admits that he cannot face dating again following his messy split from Maura Higgins

‘It was a shock to see that she had announced it on social media hours later.’ 

He insists that he is now content to remain single and will not be signing up to online dating platforms anytime soon.

The TV personality added: ‘I’m very old-fashioned. I don’t actually like talking to people over a mobile phone or laptop. I’m a very sociable person. I like to be with somebody and talk to them.’ 

Heartache: The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows

Heartache: The Love Islander, 24, has said that he is not looking for another relationship after he and his former co-star broke up in a series of blazing bust-ups and public rows

But it comes after Maura herself said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she ‘needs a man’.

The 29-year-old took to Instagram last month to discuss her love life with fans. 

She rubbished claims linking her to Dancing on Ice partner Alexander Demetriou after he separated from his wife of four years, Carlotta Edwards, last month.

Newly-single: But it comes after Maura, 29, said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she 'needs a man'

Newly-single: But it comes after Maura, 29, said that she would consider going back onto Love Island because she ‘needs a man’

Maura said during the Q and A: ‘It doesn’t bother me. We’re in 2020 and a man and woman cannot just be friends…’ 

She then zoomed in on her face and said: ‘Pure sh*** you know.’

Maura also revealed that she has struggled with adjusting to fame since leaving the Love Island villa but assured fans that she is still single. 

Asked if she would ever return to Love Island, the Irish beauty replied: ‘Well, to be honest, I need a man. So maybe I’ll go back in next year, you never know.’ 

All over: Maura's revelation comes after Dancing On Ice star Alexander Demetriou  confirmed he has separated from wife Carlotta Edwards (pictured together last November)

All over: Maura’s revelation comes after Dancing On Ice star Alexander Demetriou  confirmed he has separated from wife Carlotta Edwards (pictured together last November)

Sad times: The reality star was asked by a fan if she's bothered by the speculation surrounding her and Alexander's relationship following the news he and his wife had split

Sad times: The reality star was asked by a fan if she’s bothered by the speculation surrounding her and Alexander’s relationship following the news he and his wife had split

Confirmation: The professional skater took to Instagram stories to confirm the news and revealed to his followers that it had been a 'tough time' for him

Confirmation: The professional skater took to Instagram stories to confirm the news and revealed to his followers that it had been a ‘tough time’ for him

Last month, Alexander, 28, took to Instagram stories to confirm he had split from Carlotta amid reports that he became ‘besotted’ with Love Island beauty Maura. 

In a statement posted on Instagram stories, Alexander said: ‘I’m sorry I have been quiet on social media recently but it’s been a tough time for me personally. 

‘Carlotta and I have separated. Although it saddens me that we can no longer be together, I feel this is best for both of us.

‘I’m looking forward to what the future will bring but in the meantime let’s all say home and stay safe.’

A friend of the former couple recently told their marriage troubles ‘came as a shock’, as they were so close before the last Dancing On Ice series. 

Heartache: Maura has been single since splitting from her Love Island beau Curtis Pritchard earlier this year

Heartache: Maura has been single since splitting from her Love Island beau Curtis Pritchard earlier this year 

Source link

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The post #onlinedating | Love Island’s Curtis Pritchard admits he cannot face dating again following split from Maura Higgins | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#onlinedating | UMD professor Jonathan England remembered as loving father, fierce ally to black community | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

At night, before his sons went to sleep, Jonathan England would tell them stories of “Tio Campanero” — a character of his own invention. 

The stories usually came along with a moral, his wife, Adrienne England, remembered. Some were about being kind, while others were about being a good sport. Their children can be competitive, she explained, and don’t like to lose. 

“He was just very proud of our children,” Adrienne said. “He really enjoyed being a father.”

Jonathan England’s colleagues and students in the University of Maryland’s African American Studies department knew this well. During Zoom meetings, even though his daughter and three boys could often be seen in the background, he never shooed them away. His love for them was always so obvious — he would talk about them in the classroom, positively beaming.

Now, all who knew and loved England are grieving his loss. He died from a heart attack on June 1 at the age of 47.

When England’s friends, coworkers and students talk about him, they remember him as someone who loved people deep down to his core. Someone who was the textbook example of an ally — a white person who never overstepped in his activism. A fiercely devoted professor and mentor.

But to his wife, England was loving and selfless, a man who always put his family before himself. He was the smartest person she knew, she said, with a memory that often helped them take home a win on trivia night.

They met on an online dating site in February 2007, when Adrienne was 27 and England was 34. While Adrienne doesn’t remember what his bio said, she remembers it made her laugh out loud — as he would continue to do for their nearly 12 years of marriage. 

Adrienne still remembers when she took her daughter, Ryann, to meet England for the first time. Her daughter was about 5 years old then, rolling around on her Heelys. The whole time, England was worried she would get herself hurt, Adrienne said. 

“Our daughter was not his stepdaughter,” Adrienne said. “She was always his daughter.”

As Ryann grew up, England would take her to the park, where they would shoot hoops, challenging one another. Now, Ryann is 18 and plays basketball for East Carolina University — but England still liked to pretend he could beat her, Adrienne said. 

He would joke around, talking about the days he almost had a basketball career and how everything fell apart after he sprained his ankle. 

“He was very silly,” Adrienne said. 

[“Beyond tired”: UMD students organize protest against systemic racism, police brutality]

England never told her why he decided to devote his career to African American Studies, Adrienne said. But Jason Nichols, an African American Studies lecturer, knew that his activism was not driven by guilt or pity. It was driven by love.

“He was aware of his own whiteness in a way where it wasn’t patronizing,” Nichols recalled. “He was literally concerned for the well-being of his fellow human beings.”

Love: that’s what characterized England, said Kim Nickerson, assistant dean for diversity, equity and inclusion in the behavioral and social sciences college.

“His love for people and the topics that remain close to his heart just drove him to be the great professor, friend and administrator that he was,” he said. 

And at a time when protests against police brutality and systemic racism are sweeping the country, his death is especially tragic, said Mike Locksley, this university’s football coach. 

For two weeks now, people have taken to the streets to demand justice for George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee to his neck for almost nine minutes. In that time, there has been a spike in interest in podcasts, documentaries and books that explain the deep-rooted nature of racism in the U.S. and spell out how to be “anti-racist.”

“I know he would be one of the first people out there championing and lecturing and educating people,” Locksley said. 

For one of England’s former students, Brittney Woods, the professor’s allyship could be traced down to how he saw people. He never ignored their skin color, but he focused on their humanity, Woods said. 

Some suggested that England’s passion for African American Studies might come from where he grew up. From the first time Nichols talked to England — when Nichols was a sophomore at the university and England was a teaching assistant — he said he could tell where England was from.

“He had the whole Prince George’s County kind of swagger,” he said.

England’s roots sunk deep down into his choice of slang, which he transformed into an inside joke with his students and colleagues by exposing the “bama of the week” on social media. 

 “Bama” is the Prince George’s way of calling someone dumb, explained Marci Deloatch, coordinator and business manager for the African American Studies department. Sometimes, she said, England would call out a politician who said something they shouldn’t have. Other times, he’d share a funny local news story.

England’s bama of the week came up more than once at a vigil the university held for him June 2. There, dozens of students, faculty and alumni remembered him as a kind and supportive professor. For Woods, though, he was more than that. It was almost like he was magical.

His class felt different than any she had ever taken before, Woods said. He allowed students to have organic conversations about current events, tying everything back to the course material. And, she said, he was able to connect concepts to his students’ daily lives.

Most of the time, when Nickerson glanced into classrooms as he walked past, students would be on their phones or about to fall asleep. That wasn’t the case for England’s classes, though. 

“People were like they were at a concert,” Nickerson said. 

[Prince George’s County board of education takes steps to sever ties with county police]

At home, Adrienne often watched England plan his classes. He wanted to make a difference, she said; he wanted to reach students. He would jot down ideas on little note cards, thinking up topics to discuss with his students and ways to engage them. Adrienne would sometimes take a peek at the cards to try to decipher what he was up to. 

“His handwriting was very difficult to read,” she said, laughing. “He should have been a doctor.”

But Jonathan’s magic did not end in the classroom — it followed his students for life.

Woods currently works as a yoga instructor, she said, and is trying to figure out how to use her degree in African American Studies to promote wellness. As she navigated adulthood, she said England would check in on her. “I see what you’re doing,” she said he’d tell her. “I’m proud of you.”

A month ago, the coronavirus pandemic had forced Woods to move her instruction online. One of her new students was England. He tried to get the whole family involved, too, Adrienne remembered. As England mirrored Woods’ poses, the boys sat by his side for as long as their attention span allowed. 

“I had memories of him as an undergrad student, but now I have memories of him supporting me in my adult career, in my adult endeavors,” she said. “It’s really powerful.”

And for Jamie Tyson, England was a sort of father figure. The last part of the spring semester was especially rough for her, she said, but England was there for her. He always was. 

Back when she was England’s teaching assistant last fall, she’d always come to class with coffee and breakfast. Sometimes, England would ask about her favorite order from Starbucks and Chick-fil-a. Then, on the last day of the class, he surprised her with both.

“The way that he supported everyone and especially me — that’s something I’m definitely going to carry within me,” said Tyson, a rising senior African American Studies major.

England was a teacher for Adrienne, too, she said. He would explain what was going on in the news or aspects of the law she did not fully understand. It’s going to be different, she said, not having him here with her at a time when the nation is in turmoil.

But he did leave her with an important lesson about what will bring change in this country, she said: voting. He taught her that if you don’t use your voice, you won’t be heard, she said.

And the night before he died, England left one final lesson to the world.

“Systemic change requires acknowledgement that the system does not work. Which requires acknowledgement that the system was never designed to work for all,” he wrote on Twitter. “When those who benefit have that moment of honesty perhaps things can begin to change.”

.  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .  .  .   .  .

Source link

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The post #onlinedating | UMD professor Jonathan England remembered as loving father, fierce ally to black community | #bumble | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security