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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | NCSAM is Over, But Don’t Let Cybersecurity Fade to Black

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans This Halloween season, we’ve explored the deepest, darkest corners of cyberspace in our National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) blog series—from cyber spooks and digital demons to deathly data breaches and compliance concerns. Our panel of cybersecurity experts assembled to tell you the spookiest things they’ve seen […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Belgrade #Suspect #Arrested over Being #Part of #Hackers’ Group ‘The #Dark #Overlord’

Officials from Serbia recently detained a Belgrade resident who’s doubted as belonging to a hacking group named DarkOverlord or The Dark Overlord.

The resident, a man aged 38, uses the initials “S.S” for his name and is a Belgrade citizen.
Except for these, nothing about his identity is known.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has kept silent giving no remarks about the arrest. However, Serbian officials state they executed the detention when they were conducting an operation for exposing the people using the moniker “The Dark Overlord” online.

Running active from 2016, DarkOverlord has gained notoriety for hacking schools and medical providers to seize their personal files followed with blackmailing the institutions into paying money if they don’t want their information to be sold on the underground world. Earlier, the hackers had apparently seized addresses, phone numbers and Social Security Numbers belonging to innumerable medical patients that could’ve been utilized for committing ID-theft. In.pcmag.com posted this, May 17, 2018.

Beginning from June 2016, The Dark Overlord infiltrated the systems of 50-or-so victims, stealing a variety of data such as intellectual property and crucial health information followed with demanding ransoms in exchange of leaving the filched data safe.

The hackers’ syndicate is well-known with regards to executing one cyber-crime series spanning 2-yrs and comprising extortion along with hacking followed with revealing episodes contained in a Netflix sequence namely “Orange-is-the-New-Black” and also breaking into U.S. school computers as well as threatening the country’s students with murder.

At times the crooks weren’t satisfied with hacking they’d start physical violence threat against the hacked entities. During 2017, an infamous campaign carried out in USA included breach of systems of high schools and then theft of personal data to be followed with holding those data for ransoms. And in case the schools did not pay up, the gang would find out the contact details of staff and students from the filched data and then threaten them.

It’s not clear whether The Dark Overlord group consists of one person or several individuals. However on Twitter, it frequently uses the words “us” and “we” as reference to the gang while blackmailing hacked victims.

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The post Belgrade #Suspect #Arrested over Being #Part of #Hackers’ Group ‘The #Dark #Overlord’ appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked

Want to delete that embarrassing message you just sent? WhatsApp will let you, and so will Instagram — but if you’re using Facebook, then you’re out of luck.

Unless you’re Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO and cofounder of Facebook.

TechCrunch reported Thursday that some old messages sent by Zuckerberg and senior executives have disappeared from recipients’ Facebook Messenger inboxes, proven by the original email receipts sent at the time.

The company appeared to confirm the unique arrangement, telling TechCrunch the change was made in response to an uptick in hacking.

“After Sony Pictures’ emails were hacked in 2014 we made a number of changes to protect our executives’ communications. These included limiting the retention period for Mark’s messages in Messenger. We did so in full compliance with our legal obligations to preserve messages,” the company said.

The Sony hack targeted the emails of Sony film executives, which revealed a side of Hollywood rarely seen by outsiders, and the decision to name the event as a catalyst for Facebook’s message purge indicates how troubling the incident was in Silicon Valley — and that Facebook was concerned about being hacked.

The company also raised the idea of a “retention period,” though there is no such thing for normal users. If a user long presses a private message on Facebook a “Delete Message” pop up confirms that the function will “delete your copy of the message,” and the recipients’ copy will remain.

Facebook-owned Instagram has long had the option to “unsend” direct messages, while Facebook-owned WhatsApp recently launched a deletion function where unread messages can be deleted “for everyone.” A message is then displayed to all participants that content has been deleted.

But Zuckerberg’s deleted messages didn’t leave behind any such message, probably because they had already been read, many years ago.

The messages were originally sent to former employees and people outside of Facebook. According to TechCrunch, the recipients of the now-deleted messages were not informed at any stage that correspondence they received had been erased.

Zuckerberg may be the CEO of Facebook, but it’s unclear how the decision to remove senior executives’ messages would be allowed under the company’s terms of service. The terms only allow Facebook to remove content if the company believes “that it violates this Statement or our policies” or for infringing copyright.

Deleting messages quietly, and selectively, also appears to fly in the face of Facebook’s campaign to “make the world more open and transparent.” Its own policies say that the company “should publicly make available information about its purpose, plans, policies, and operations.”

Facebook appears to have not followed these policies in this instance, and it raises questions about the recipient’s right to privacy.

The news comes just weeks after the Cambridge Analytica scandal which has seen Zuckerberg admit that tens of millions of users probably had their data scraped.

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The post Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Tinder #vulnerability allows #hackers to take over #accounts with just one #phone number

Source: National Cyber Security News

After it was reported last month that online dating app Tinder had a security flaw, which allows strangers to see users’ photos and matches, security firm, Appsecure has now uncovered a new flaw which is potentially more damaging.

Infiltrators who exploit the vulnerability will be able to get access to users’ account with the help of their login phone number. The issue has, however, been fixed after Tinder was alerted by Appsecure.

Appsecure says, the hackers could have taken advantage of two vulnerabilities to attack accounts, with one being Tinder’s own API and the other in Facebook’s Account Kit system which Tinder uses to manage the logins.

In a statement sent to The Verge, a Tinder spokesperson said, “Security is a top priority at Tinder. However, we do not discuss any specific security measures or strategies, so as not to tip off malicious hackers.”

The vulnerability exposed the access tokens of the users. If a hacker is able to obtain a user’s valid access token then he/she can easily take over a user account.

“We quickly addressed this issue and we’re grateful to the researcher who brought it to our attention,” The Verge quoted a Facebook representative as saying.

Read More….

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Man, 30, held over #hacking attacks on two #Hong Kong #travel #agencies

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Officers raid IT worker’s flat on Cheung Chau and also seize two desktop computers, two laptops, one tablet, three hard disks and five mobile phones

A 30-year-old Hong Kong man was arrested in connection with cyberattacks in which the computers of two travel agencies in the city were hacked and their clients’ sensitive personal information held for ransom, with payouts in bitcoin sought last week.

The two travel agencies reported the incidents to police on January 1 and 2.

One bitcoin (HK$123,735 or US$15,819) was demanded as a ransom in each hacking case, according to police.

Officers from the force’s Cyber Security and Technology Crime Bureau raided a flat in the outlying island of Cheung Chau and arrested the man on Saturday.

During the operation, police seized two desktop computers, two laptops, one tablet, three hard disks and five mobile phones in the flat.

At lunchtime on Monday, police escorted the suspect to his workplace on Hoi Yuen Road in the Kwun Tong district of Kowloon to gather evidence.

The Post understands the suspect, a computer technician, hacked into the computers of the agencies on New Year’s Day through security loopholes on their websites hours before the companies were hit with demands for a ransom to be paid in bitcoin.

“An email was sent to the persons in charge of the companies after the personal information of more than 20,000 customers was stolen from the computer servers of the agencies,” a police source said.

“The companies were told to pay in bitcoin in a newly opened account with threats that their customers’ data would be posted on the internet if the firms failed to pay on Saturday.”

The stolen information included customers’ names, identity card numbers and contact numbers but no credit card information was involved.

Officers from the Cyber Security and Technology Crime Bureau were understood to have worked around the clock and checked tens of thousands of log records to the servers to gather information.

“Investigations showed circuitous routes were used to hack into the computer servers, but officers eventually identified the suspect through his IP address,” another source said.

He said the man was nabbed at home on Cheung Chau hours before the payment deadline.

Officers would carry out a forensic examination of the victims’ computers and hard disks to gather information, he said.

At about 5pm on Monday, the suspect was still being held for questioning and had not been charged.

“We believe his motive was to look for money,” said bureau superintendent Swalikh Mohammed said.

Investigations were continuing and he did not rule out the possibility of further arrests.

“The cyber world is not a lawless place where criminals can hide. A majority of the laws applicable to the real world can also be applied to the internet,” he warned.

He said blackmail was a serious offence that carries a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.

Travel agency Goldjoy Holidays revealed on Thursday that unauthorised parties accessed its customer database containing personal information such as names and identity card numbers, passport details and phone numbers.

The company apologised to customers and promised it was taking steps to tighten cybersecurity.

The other agency, Big Line Holiday, said on Wednesday night that hackers might have broken into its database a day earlier and gained possession of some of its customers’ personal information.

The data was believed to include ID card numbers, home return permit numbers and phone numbers.

In a statement, Big Line said: “Our company attaches great importance to this incident and deeply apologises to the affected clients.”

Big Line, which has 13 branches and organises tours to mainland China and Asia, said it received a letter from perpetrators demanding a sum of money for the release of the information.

In November, one of the city’s largest travel agencies, Hong Kong-listed WWPKG Holdings, revealed that its customer database had also been hacked, putting at risk personal data such as ID card numbers and credit card information of some 200,000 customers.

The culprits had asked for a seven-figure ransom, to be paid in bitcoin, but the firm did not pay and instead called the police, who later managed to decrypt the data. Because of the hacking incident, all four of the agency’s branches -in Tsim Sha Tsui, Mong Kok, Causeway Bay and Sha Tin – were closed for a day.

The force recorded 653 cases of cybercrimes in 2005, the first year it began tracking such offences, and saw the number reach 5,939 in 2016, with financial losses hitting HK$2.3 billion.

The post Man, 30, held over #hacking attacks on two #Hong Kong #travel #agencies appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Restaurant-goer has #Bitcoins #stolen over #unsecured public #wireless #network

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

AFTER logging on to the public Wi-Fi at a restaurant, a man unwittingly had $155,000 stolen from his digital wallet. This is the real problem with Bitcoin.

AN UNSUSPECTING diner has had $155,000 worth of the digital currency Bitcoin stolen from him while logged on to a restaurant’s unsecured public Wi-Fi network.

The incident reportedly took place in an Austrian restaurant this week with the cyber thieves moving the digital currency to an “unknown, non-traceable account,” police said in a statement.

The 36-year-old victim reportedly logged on to the unsecured network to check the value of his Bitcoin holdings. He later realised that $100,000 euros worth had been stolen.

It remains unclear whether the victim’s account was already hacked before he logged on to the unsecured network, police said.

The incident, while small in nature, highlights the issue of hackers targeting personal Bitcoin accounts as the digital currency has exploded in value in recent years.

While Bitcoin is arguably becoming mainstream, it has had to endure a string of controversies along the way.

In January 2014, a Japanese-based Bitcoin exchange known as Mt Gox was hacked. It was once the largest bitcoin intermediary and the world’s leading bitcoin exchange before thieves made off with 850,000 BTC. At today’s value, that’s worth a staggering $A 9,147,700,000.

In June this year, South Korea’s largest Ethereum (another popular cryptocurrency) and Bitcoin exchange was breached by hackers who stole customers’ data and targeted their accounts in an effort to drain their digital wallets. According to local media reports, one person claimed to have lost 1.2 billion won, or about $A1.4 million.

And this week, a cryptocurrency start-up specialising in Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) called Confido raised about $500,000 before the company’s website and founders vanished, along with the cash.

These are just a few examples of the potential dangers posed by operating in the still emerging crypto market. That being said, the threat of hackers certainly isn’t a problem confined to cryptocurrencies as hackers have also targeted central banks, recently fleecing more than $US100 million from the Bangladesh central bank’s account at the US Federal Reserve.

But if you’re going to check how much your Bitcoin wallet is worth, maybe be careful about where you log on.

The post Restaurant-goer has #Bitcoins #stolen over #unsecured public #wireless #network appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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How to #give your #parents the #cyber-security #talk over the #holidays

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Times have changed. Talk around the Thanksgiving table is a lot different in this tech age than it used to be.

I can picture kids gathered with their electronic devices and adults talking about the latest technology at work or their latest game console. All of this is going on while parents and grandparents are trying to keep up and learn this new language and terminology.

While kids are used to parents talking to them about things in their best interest, the tide has turned. It’s now time for us to have that security talk with mom and dad about protecting them in the cyber world.

The talk

You might not want to bring it up while mom or dad takes a bite of turkey and mashed potatoes, but at some point during Thanksgiving Day, you should talk to them about keeping their personal information safe online.

Unfortunately, we’ve seen too many high-profile hacks over the last year. With just the Equifax breach alone, half of Americans were impacted.

So, look at Thanksgiving as a chance to provide security tips to all of your family members. But you might have to explain it in a way they understand. Many don’t know that a virus also infects a computer and you might get a cold stare when you mention the word “phishing.”

Ransomware and varying types of encryption are also words you might want to stay away from, at least in the beginning.

Phishing

Explain to them that phishing is when someone pretends to be someone else in order to steal information such as a credit card number, password or anything else that could be used in another attack. This is usually done through email and often contains a link to a website designed to trick you. Verizon’s data breach investigations report says 91 percent of data breaches happen this way. It’s also the most common way to get hit with viruses.

In simple terms, let your loved ones know that by avoiding phishing emails now they won’t have to deal with a stolen credit card months or even a year down the road.

There are three main ways to spot a phishing email: bad grammar, a thinly-veiled email disguise such as facebookk.com instead of facebook.com and weird links. You can hover your mouse over photos and links to see where they’ll lead you before clicking on them. If an email claiming to be from a legitimate site is actually going to a suspicious website, that’s a good sign it’s a scam.

Password managers

Let your parents know there are password managers that can help you in remembering different passwords for all of your accounts. It’s not necessary for them to keep track of all of them.

You only have to remember one password when you use a password manager. You just simply log onto that and it’ll sync your browsers and devices, creating security and convenience.

Other misc advice

Some of this might be a little complicated to those who are in the beginning stages of learning technology. Instead of going into too much detail, here are simple ways to explain these terms.

HTTPS and SSL: If you see a green lock next to the URL on a website (that means you’re on an HTTPS page), that means you’re on a website that has a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

Ransomware: This is a virus that locks up your files and sometimes your entire computer unless you pay the ransom. The best solution is to back up your files regularly.

Patching: If you get sent an update from a company like Microsoft and Apple, go ahead and update your device. This can prevent hackers from accessing your computer.

Two-factor authentication: Think of this as the equivalent of having two locks on your door. It’s an extra layer of security on top of your computer password. The most common version is a code texted to your phone after entering your password. This makes it tougher for hackers to gain access to your accounts.

The best way of explaining computer security to your loved ones is to compare it to things they’d do at home like locking windows and doors. Showing them statistics of all the millions who’ve been impacted by these security breaches is another good method. Statistically, you’re more likely to be robbed online than you are in person.

The post How to #give your #parents the #cyber-security #talk over the #holidays appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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IS #militants #hack into #Swedish #radio station in #Malmo, take over #broadcast

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The attack occurred Friday morning in the southern city of Malmo, but went unnoticed until listeners began calling in. Experts say it is unlikely the prepetrators will be caught.

Islamic State militants hacked into a Swedish radio station Friday, taking over its transmission and broadcasting an English language propaganda song aimed at recruiting more militants.

The song entitled, “For the Sake of Allah” played for about 30 minutes on the Mix Megapol station in Malmo. Mix Megapol is an FM and internet-based radio station that is part of a private radio network.

Jakob Gravestam, a Marketing Director for the Bauer Media Group, which operates the Malmo-based station, issued a statement that said “Somebody interfered with our frequency using a pirate transmitter.”

Mix Megapol is one of Sweden’s biggest radio stations, and has about 1.4 million listeners daily. But the pirated transmission was only heard in parts of the southern city of Malmo, Sweden’s third largest metropolis, with a population of about 350,000.

The song features male voices singing, in English, such lyrics as: “For the sake of Allah we will march to gates of the paradise where our maidens await. We are men who love death just as you love your life, we are soldiers who fight in the day and the night.”

Preventing such attacks

The hack occurred during a popular morning show ‘Anders & Gry with Friends’ but the hosts didn’t notice anything was askew until listeners called in and asked what was going on.

“A lot of people have called us about this,” Gravestam told the 24Malmo website. “We are very happy that people are vigilant and we treat this very seriously.”

Gravestam said the attack highlights the need for broadcasters to discuss how to “prevent” such incidents. He added that Bauer Media will organize such a discussion and invite other broadcasters, as well as the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS), which monitors the electronic communications and postal sectors, to the meeting.

The post IS #militants #hack into #Swedish #radio station in #Malmo, take over #broadcast appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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