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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Charging phones this way can be risky

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans More than most professionals, real estate agents tend to find themselves on the go. And that often means finding new places to charge various electronic devices after, or during, a long day of phone calls and texts with clients. However, officials this week issued a stark […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | New plan to protect phones from scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

All mobile phone numbers will be shielded against scammers under a federal government crackdown on illegal “porting”, which each year costs thousands of victims $10,000-plus.

The Daily Telegraph can reveal Communications Minister Paul Fletcher will force small telecommunications companies to close a loophole that lets cyber-crooks steal the numbers of consumers contracted to any provider before seeking to clear out bank accounts.

The telcos will have to add an extra layer of protection to the process of porting, which is when a mobile service is moved from one provider to another.

This will stop scammers who have obtained a person’s online banking login details from being able to steal money.

In an all too common rort, scammers port a target’s mobile number into their control, which allows them to input the security code sent to phones when cash transfer requests are made.

Paul Fletcher wants to fight fraudsters with technology. Picture: AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Mr Fletcher said the additional safeguard had already been adopted by Telstra, Optus, Vodafone and others, but the “government expects all telcos to pull their weight”.

Unless all players act, every mobile phone customer is exposed, because scammers can port to a provider that isn’t doing the added check.

“There are still some smaller operators which are not yet implementing this extra layer of safety which creates an opportunity for criminals and a vulnerability for Australians,” Mr Fletcher told The Telegraph.

He has directed the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) to make new rules mandating stronger identity checks before numbers can be transferred.

“I want Australians to be confident that every telco has put in place strong verification processes to stop fraudulent mobile number porting and the devastating consequences it can have for victims,” Mr Fletcher said.

His move signals the start of the government’s Scam Technology Project, which will be led by the ACMA and involve experts from major telcos, with the goal of developing tech-based solutions to combat fraudsters.

“If criminals are using technology to scam Australians, we need to make sure we are using technology to fight back,” Mr Fletcher said.

“Criminals will continue to look for new ways to rip off Australians using the telephone system. That is why tackling telecommunications scams is a priority.”

One in three people whose number is unlawfully ported suffer a financial loss which averages $11,400.

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Your #phone’s #gyroscope could let #hackers guess your #PIN

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Security researchers have documented a way to unlock a target’s phone using readings from “zero-permission” sensors. Apps can access sensors such as the accelerometer and gyroscope without special permissions. The readings can be used to deduce your PIN.

Zero-permission sensors
Most smartphone hardware is protected against ordinary access from apps unless you’ve specially granted permission. If you’ve ever used an app that needs camera or microphone access, you’ll have seen a prompt to enable the functionality. Some sensors, including the accelerometer, barometer, proximity sensor and ambient light sensor, aren’t protected though, ostensibly because they’re non-critical and can’t intrude on your privacy.
A paper from researchers at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore suggests this lack of security might need to be reconsidered. As Sophos’ Naked Security blog explains, the researchers managed to correctly guess Android smartphone PIN codes with a 99.5% accuracy using data obtained from the “non-critical” sensors.

Because the sensors in modern smartphones are so accurate, the information they provide is sufficient to monitor a user’s activity. By looking at whether you’re moving, what angle you’re holding your phone at and basic environmental details, an attacker could glean enough clues to work out your PIN code.

The proof-of-concept attack demonstrated by the researchers analyses how a phone moves about as the user enters their PIN code. Because each number is in a standard location on the screen, the rotation and tilt of the phone provides pointers that identify the key being pressed. Most users will cause their phone to move in distinct ways as they reach for the top numbers and apply pressure to the screen.
Functionality over security

The researchers said that smartphone manufacturers should reconsider how they’re protecting the sensors being added to new devices. Hardware products such as fitness trackers and VR devices are dependent on the output from sensors. However, leaving physical sensors unprotected could give attackers a way to compromise phones without the owner ever suspecting.

“New technologies, such as health trackers, augmented or virtual reality, require more and more computing power and an increasing number and quality of physical sensors, to advance the user experience,” wrote the researchers. “However, the security countermeasures and the privacy protections implemented in smartphones are not improved at the same pace.”
The proof-of-concept attack could be implemented by malicious actors using a fake app. This could use machine learning techniques to accurately guess PIN codes after watching the user unlock their device several times. The only way to ensure protection is for mobile operating system vendors to place permissions around all physical sensors, giving users control over the apps that can use them.

The post Your #phone’s #gyroscope could let #hackers guess your #PIN appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Are Our Phones the Next Victims of Hacking?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Lately, there is no shortage of hacks going on and the next vulnerability could be right in the palm of your hand – literally. Millions of mobile phones, laptops and home devices could be at risk of hacking after researchers discovered a new way to take over devices using the…

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Vetting of social media, phones possible as part of travel ban review

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The Trump administration is developing new ways to vet people coming into the United States as a deadline in the President’s controversial travel ban nears, officials said Tuesday. “Each of the opportunities that the US government has to interview and/or vet potential inbound travelers is being reviewed,” acting Customs and…

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The 11 year old ‘cyber ninja’ who stunned experts at a security conference by hacking their phones and showing how to ‘weaponise’ a smart teddy bear

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ An 11-year-old ‘cyber ninja’ stunned an audience of security experts Tuesday by hacking into their Bluetooth devices to manipulate a teddy bear and show how interconnected smart toys ‘can be weaponised’. …

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Cell phones charging are at greatest risk from hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cell phones charging are at greatest risk from hackers

Cell phones, as with websites and other forms of communications equipment, are at risk from hacking. A major vulnerability arises with smartphones when they are charging, according to a new study from the New York Institute of Technology. The risks of charging a smartphone via a USB cord have been established for a while. What the new study shows is …

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Malicious Android malware lets hackers access your phone’s connected network

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Malicious Android malware lets hackers access your phone’s connected network

Security researchers have discovered a new strain of malware that turns Android devices into backdoors, giving malicious attackers the ability to access any internal network that the infected device is …

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New York man charged with trying to buy phones with stolen ID

roberto-garcia-charged-with-forgery-and-id-theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

New York man charged with trying to buy phones with stolen ID

BOARDMAN, Ohio (WKBN) – A Bronx, New York man was arrested after police said he tried to purchase cell phones at the Southern Park Mall with a stolen identification card.
Roberto Garcia, 20, was picked up at the Spring store

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Android bug ‘could allow hackers complete access to 900 million phones’

android (1)

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Android bug ‘could allow hackers complete access to 900 million phones’

Almost one billion Android devices are affected by a serious security flaw which can give attackers access to all data and hardware, including the camera. The vulnerability, dubbed ‘Quadrooter’ was flagged by researchers from Check Point, an international cyber security company. It affects all devices which use a Qualcomm chip – thought to be in […]

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