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#sextrafficking | Social Media Posts Describing Predators Scrawling Letters and Numbers on Vehicles, Not Proven, Says EPD and HCSO – Redheaded Blackbelt | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

[Staged photo from the EPD] After receiving multiple people asking if the 1F/1C written in the dust on cars social media posts were real, we reached out the the Humboldt […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | The Top 10 State of Security Blog Posts from 2019

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

It’s been another fantastic year on The State of Security blog. With over 350 blogs published from all walks of the security community, we like to think of the blog as more of an industry resource that caters to not only experienced security professionals but also to those who are new to the community.

To finish the year off, I wanted to look back on some of my personal favorites. I’ve tried to include a mixture of different styles, topics and authors. If you haven’t already, have a read of the 10 State of Security blog posts below and sign up to our daily feed here.

BlueKeep (CVE- 2019-0708) was big news in 2019. The vulnerability was described as “wormable” by Microsoft, and users were warned that BlueKeep might be exploited in a similar fashion to how the WannaCry ransomware used the Eternal Blue vulnerability to spread widely in 2017. As with WannaCry, many organizations were vulnerable to this exploit, especially those who use operating systems like Windows XP. In this blog, ICS security expert, Gary DiFazio looks at the impact this vulnerability has on the ICS environment and provides some tips to help users stay secure.

Read the full blog here.


 

 

 

It’s almost 2020, and phishing attacks still don’t show any sign of slowing down. In this blog, David Bisson looks at six of the most common methods of phishing attacks and then provides useful tips for readers on how they can protect themselves. Also, this blog is complemented by some great graphics to share with your colleagues, family and friends.

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High Risk Oversharing: How hackers are using social media posts to cause chaos

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

High Risk Oversharing: How hackers are using social media posts to cause chaos

The moment and stories we like to “share” and love to “like” could be putting us at risk for hackers. It’s called social engineering – hackers pull information from your social media post and using it against you, your family or even the company you work for. Boston 25 News took a look at the techniques being used and how …

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Cyber security firm FireEye posts surprise rise in revenue

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cyber security firm FireEye posts surprise rise in revenue

Cyber security firm FireEye Inc reported a surprise 3.4 percent rise in quarterly revenue, helped by strength in its product subscription and services business.

FireEye’s shares jumped 13.8 percent to $13.90 after the bell on Tuesday.

The company’s billings, a closely watched indicator of future business, fell 18 percent to $152.4 million in the first quarter, compared with a fall of 14 percent in the previous quarter.

However, billings in the latest quarter beat analysts’ estimates of $142.5 million, according to financial data and analytics firm FactSet.

FireEye expects billings of $173 million-$179 million in the second quarter, above analysts’ estimate of $170.9 million.

The company is amid a transition to a software-as-a-service model (SaaS) from its traditional business that centered around the sale of hardware boxes.

“The revenue level looks like it could be stabilizing, you’re probably seeing a change in complexion of the revenue towards more subscription and services,” Wedbush Securities analyst Steve Koenig said.

FireEye remains confident of renewed growth in the second half of 2017, helped by the introduction of products such as the Helix platform, which combines network processing and analytics with endpoint analytics.

“We fully expect in the fourth quarter that we’re going to be non-GAAP profitable, and then you would expect that to be the case from 2018 on,” FireEye Chief Financial Officer Frank Verdecanna said in an interview on Tuesday.

The Milpitas, California-based company also forecast revenue of $173 million to $179 million for the current quarter. Analysts on average were expecting revenue of $173.31 million, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.

FireEye, which provides web, email and malware security to businesses and governments, said its revenue rose to $173.7 million in the quarter ended March 31, from $168 million in the year-earlier period.

Analysts on average had expected revenue to fall about 2.6 percent to $163.7 million.

Net loss attributable to the company’s shareholders narrowed to $83 million, or 48 cents per share, from $155.9 million, or 98 cents per share.

Excluding items, FireEye reported a loss of 9 cents per share. Analysts were expecting a loss of 26 cents.

Through Tuesday’s close, the stock had risen 2.6 percent, underperforming the 10.8 percent gain in the broader Nasdaq Composite index.

(Reporting by Narottam Medhora in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel and Martina D’Couto)

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CIA is investing in firms that specialize in sifting through social media posts

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The Central Intelligence Agency’s venture capital arm is investing in companies that develop artificial intelligence to sift through enormous numbers of social media postings and decipher patterns, according to a report.
A document obtained by The Intercept indicates that In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, has made unpublicized investments in 38 companies, many of which are startups specializing in analyzing and extracting useful patterns from large amounts of data from social media.
Social media offers a trove of valuable information for intelligence agencies, but separating the signal from the noise is a monumental task.

“ISIL’s tweets and other social media messages publicizing their activities often produce information that, especially in the aggregate, provides real intelligence value,” CIA second-in-command David Cohen said in a speech at Cornell University in September.

Dataminr, PATHAR and Geofeedia and are among the startups listed in the report, and the products that all three of the companies provide are tools that help peer through an otherwise unwieldy volume of data.

Dataminr’s specialty is picking out trends on Twitter by using a stream of data it gets from the social media platform’s API, or application program interface. News organizations, law enforcement agencies and hedge funds are examples of clients who use the service to stay in the loop about relevant events in real time.

PATHAR’s flagship service, Dunami, is used to by clients, including the FBI, to map out networks of relations between people on social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to find centers of influence.

Geofeedia automatically monitors geotagged social media posts for the purpose of monitoring breaking news events, and even markets its services to help law enforcement predict violent protests.

“During the Baltimore riots, or Ferguson, you could see a drop [in sentiment],” Lee Guthman, head of business development at Geofeedia, told Inverse, adding that a drop in sentiment on social media could reliably predict the violent riots those events.

All of these firms already have deals with the federal government, and the contracts are publicly viewable, thanks to transparency laws. Dataminr’s $254,990 contract was awarded by the Department of Homeland Security, Geofeedia has earned $126,800 from the Department of Justice, and PATHAR has deals totaling $410,118 from both of those agencies.
Source:https://www.rt.com/usa/339671-cia-investing-social-analytics/

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