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Coronavirus Raises New Business Continuity, …

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

What happens when understaffed security teams at home and abroad are sequestered in physical quarantine zones?

(image by Romolo Tavani, via Adobe Stock)

(image by Romolo Tavani, via Adobe Stock)

Cyberattackers are barraging businesses with phishing lures touting fake info about the Coronavirus. And although the lures may be fake, the security and business continuity threats that some IT departments are preparing for are quite real. One big question: If workers are sequestered in physical quarantine zones, will IT and SecOps be able to continue? 

Initially, businesses may dismiss this risk until the virus reaches their regions. However, the risk is more prevalent as the IT supply chain becomes more global and organizations rely on overseas IT services — from help desks to 24/7 SOC-as-a-service. The concern is not just that workers themselves may get infected by the virus; the concern is that employees, contractors, and service providers’ workers who are not infected could nevertheless be quarantined for being in physical proximity to the infected individual. 

“If you’ve got 200 workers working in one place and one of them presents themselves with the illness, it’s pretty likely the government is going to quarantine everybody,” says Edward Minyard, senior consultant at IP Architects, who was an Accenture consultant working with Mexico City on pandemic prevention during the H1N1 virus spread in 2019. “And the current [quarantine] protocol is for 14 days. So that can have a material impact on folks’ planning.

“If you’ve got a large outsourced facility, for example, for your security management, or any facilty with a large number of people in it, you probably don’t want to bring 100 people together and put them in a small room unless you yourself have some evidence that they have not been affected. … And the second part of the challenge is they may not be able to get there. Or even want to go there.”

Minyard says his American clients are beginning to consider the secondary impact they may feel if the virus further expands in, for example, India, a source of so many IT services. (Although India shares its norther border with China, it has thus far experienced only three confirmed cases of the virus, according to the World Health Organization, all of which are in Kerala, a western coastal state that does not border China.)

Nevertheless, Indian businesses have reported disruptions because of the stoppages in shipments from China, where over 45,000 confirmed infections and over 1,000 deaths have been reported, and many millions are in quarantine. All the way over in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress — the world’s biggest trade show for the mobile phone industry — was canceled just one week before it was set to start. 

Ths same challenges also apply to telecoms, electric companies, “and all the others that maintain the networks that are supposed to be supporting the rest of us,” Minyard says.

“From the perspective of business continuity and continuity of operations, this is a real thing,” he says. “This is not speculation. This is going on, and we don’t know how bad it’s going to be. Should you have all your eggs in one basket … I’d be thinking of a different plan.” 

IT security departments, already short-staffed, could be stressed even further than most other teams. And that’s something about the coronavirus that cyberattackers will surely capitalize on — just as they have already.  

Phishing Extravaganza 
Cybersecurity companies have been spilling over with detections and reports of phishing messages that use coronavirus-related lures. The messages include malicious links and attachments and download a variety of malware, from Emotet to wipers to remote access Trojans (RATs).  

The World Health Organization issued a warning about such scams.

Trustwave reported an Office 365 credential-stealing attack, which used a lure appearing to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (complete with CDC logo and legitimate display address) and the subject header “New case confirmed in your city.”  

Proofpoint discovered a credential-stealer that capitalized on panic with a lure claiming that a secret cure existed and that the government was using the disease as a government bioweapon.

Proofpoint, as well as Cisco Talos, reported messages purporting to provide tips for virus protection; these appeared to be sent not only by official government organizations, but by businesses’ upper management. These messages were used to steal credentials, drop malware like Emotet and — in lures specifically targeting the manufacturing and shipping industries — the Nanocore RAT. 

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Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad … View Full Bio

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#deepweb | Bookkeeping Platform Receipt Bank Raises $73M

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Share Tweet Share Share Share Print Email Digital bookkeeping platform Receipt Bank notched approximately $73 million in equity and debt in a Series C funding round, according to an announcement by global investment bank Harris Williams. The funding round was led by Insight Partners, which was […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#hacking | Priyanka Gandhi Raises Concerns On WhatsApp Hacking

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Congress leader Priyanka Gandhi Vadra on Friday said if the BJP or the government engaged Israeli agencies to snoop into the phones of journalists, lawyers, activists and politicians, it is a “scandal” with grave ramifications on national security.

Her remarks come after WhatsApp said that Indian scribes and human rights activists were among those globally spied upon by unnamed entities using Israeli spyware Pegasus.

“If the BJP or the government has engaged Israeli agencies to snoop into the phones of journalists, lawyers, activists and politicians, it is a gross violation of human rights and a scandal with grave ramifications on national security,” Priyanka Gandhi said in a tweet.

Waiting for the government’s response, the Congress general secretary said.

The Congress on Thursday attacked the Modi government over the issue, alleging that it had been “caught snooping”. The opposition party demanded a Supreme Court-monitored probe into the “illegal hacking” of cellphones.

Amid the controversy, government asked the Facebook-owned messaging service to explain the breach and list out measures that have been taken to safeguard privacy of millions of Indians. IT Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said that the government is committed to protecting the privacy of Indian citizens.

(PTI)

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Basic #Payment #cash raises #computer #hacker #threat

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Basic #Payment #cash raises #computer #hacker #threat

EASY access to information about Scottish farmers’ Basic Payments has made them prime targets for cyber crime, the Scottish Business Resilience Centre has warned.

At the end of October, payments worth £254million were issued to farmers and crofters across the country, and SBRC advised farmers to be “extra vigilant” regarding their internet safety, including being aware of suspicious emails or phone calls.

Chief ‘ethical hacker’ with the SBRC, Gerry Grant, said: “I know how vital these payments are to the livelihood of farmers and crofters. This makes it even more important that they’re fully aware that it can make them an easy target for criminals to try and scam them.

“Criminals can easily work out an accurate estimation of what a farmer is likely to receive in CAP payments and armed with this information, they can try and steal the money. They can send various emails to try and get passwords for bank accounts or even try and trick unsuspecting farmers into making payments to the wrong account.”

The types of emails and calls farmers may receive will generally consist of them being asked to take urgent action regarding their finances/bank accounts. SBRC said that any unusual emails or phone calls should be investigated fully, and the contact details should be verified before any action is taken.

Things to look out for include:

• Emails from suppliers asking for funds to be transferred to a different bank account;

• Emails claiming that there is a problem with an account;

• Phone calls from banks saying that there appears to be unusual activity on their account.

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Former tech adviser to Bill Gates raises $2M for cybersecurity startup that discourages hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Former tech adviser to Bill Gates raises $2M for cybersecurity startup that discourages hackers

Cybersecurity company Polyverse has raised $2 million in a new round of funding to continue building out its “moving target defense” platform. What is moving target defense, you ask? Polyverse CEO Alex Gounares, who previously served as CTO of AOL, corporate vice president at Microsoft and technology advisor to Bill Gates, explains it well. It can be related to, of …

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Mum raises awareness of bullying after seven-year-old son is hospitalised with head wounds

The mum of a seven-year-old boy who was continuously bullied at school has taken to Facebook to raise awareness after he was hospitalised with head wounds.

Seven-year-old Jak had complained of bullies at his school in Telford to his mum, but despite talking to the school she had been unable to stop the latest attack happening.

On a Facebook page called ‘Justice for Jak’, his mum has posted an upsetting account of what she has already been through to get help for her son, who was left with a serious head injury after ‘the bully was hitting my son in school and pushed him so hard he hit his head on a metal pole’.

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HYPR raises $3 million to keep hackers from getting their hands on your fingerprints

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

HYPR raises $3 million to keep hackers from getting their hands on your fingerprints

If your account gets hacked these days, the first thing you’ll do typically is reset your password, maybe beef up your security settings, and proceed to use the account or app again. But what if hackers get their hands on

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ESSA Raises K-12 Stakes in 2016 State-Level Elections – Education Week

Whoever voters pick in November’s legislative and gubernatorial races will have significant new leverage in shaping states’ education agendas under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

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#pso #htcs #b4inc

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Melbourne cybersecurity startup ResponSight raises $1.15 million in seed funding

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Melbourne cybersecurity startup ResponSight raises $1.15 million in seed funding

Melbourne cybersecurity startup ResponSight has raised $1.15 million in a seed funding led by Carthona Capital, with follow on investment from Black Sheep Capital. The startup is responsible for providing risk solutions to large enterprises through reporting and analysing security

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Matchmaking App Aisle Raises $183K

VCCIRCLE – Jan 28 – Bangalore-based startup Aisle Network that runs matchmaking app Aisle, has raised Rs 1.25 crore ($183K) in its pre-Series A round. Read More….

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