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#deepweb | Home Insurance valuation MCQ Quantity Surveyors research underinsurance

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Thousands of Australian property owners could have their homes dramatically underinsured thanks to error-prone online valuation calculators.

New research by MCG Quantity Surveyors claims that some owners could be under-insured by up to 66 percent, heightening the risk of financial losses as Australia lurches into bushfire and flood season.

The find comes after MCG conducted a review of web-based calculators against a detailed professional cost estimation of a home in Sydney’s south-west.

Some properties could be underinsured by up to 66 percent – leaving owners with deep financial losses in the event of a claim. (Nine)

A professional valuation was made on a property in Airds, which calculated the construction cost plus sums for demolition, removal of site debris and consultant’s fees to be $668,559.

Information for the same property was then plugged into five online home insurance calculators which produced a vast array of sums.

Marty Sadlier, director of MCG Quantity Surveyors, said the difference between the professional estimation and the web-based calculator was hundreds of thousands of dollars.

An example of an online home insurance calculator. (Cordell Sum Sure)

“The lowest value calculator assessed the insurance value at $226,160 – or 66 percent below the needed amount, while the highest web-based estimate was $535,000 which is still 20 percent underinsured,” Mr Sadlier said.

“Not only do these calculators tend to under estimate construction costs overall, most don’t include amounts for demolition, debris removal, cost escalations and consultant’s fees.”

Mr Sadlier said the reliance on web-based calculators by insurance companies could see vulnerable home owners at risk.

Mr Sadlier claims that web-based calculators do not take into account the myriad of costs associated with rebuilding. (AAP)

“This epidemic of underinsurance could prove totally shattering, and is due almost entirely to the ongoing use of web-based insurance calculators,” Mr Sadlier said.

“Worst of all, these erroneous calculators continue to be recommended by insurance companies and even government departments, despite long-term evidence of their failings.”

According to the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), estimating how much to ensure your home by can become a complex process.

“When estimating how much home building insurance you need, it’s important not only to consider the cost to rebuild your home, but also factor in other costs you may not have thought about, such as accommodation while you rebuild,” ASIC recommends on its money smart website.

“Underinsurance is when you don’t have enough insurance to cover all the costs of rebuilding your home.

“You are considered to be underinsured if your insurance covers less than 90 percent of the rebuilding costs.”

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#cybersecurity | SolarWinds Research Reveals Negligent Users as Top Cybersecurity Threat to German Organisations

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

BERLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–SolarWinds (NYSE:SWI), a leading provider of powerful and affordable IT management software, today released findings of its latest cybersecurity research at it-sa (Booth #127). The research highlights the threats technology professionals face today and those they expect over the next 12 months, revealing internal factors as the most prominent cybersecurity threat.

The research of over 100 IT professionals in Germany revealed internal user mistakes created the largest percentage of cybersecurity incidents over the past twelve months (80%), followed by exposures caused by poor network system or application security (36%), and external threat actors infiltrating the organisation’s network or systems (31%).

Poor password management ranked as the leading cause of concern for German IT professionals regarding insider threats. Forty-five percent of tech pros surveyed indicated poor password management or weak passwords as the most common cause of accidental or careless insider breaches, while 42% cited sharing passwords as the most common problem. Password management issues, accidental exposure, deletion, corruption or modification of critical data (40%), and copying data to unsecured devices (36%) were the other leading causes reported that lead to insider mistakes.

The survey results also found that 89% of tech pros surveyed indicated they feel unequipped to successfully implement and manage cybersecurity tasks today with their current IT skillset.

“Our research shows once again that the biggest risk to the organization comes from the inside, aligning with research SolarWinds conducted in other regions earlier this year,” said Tim Brown, vice president of security, SolarWinds. “This underscores the continued need for organizations to address the human side of IT security and consistently educate users on how to avoid mistakes, while encouraging an environment of learning and training. However, that alone is not enough; tech pros also need the best possible technology to effectively fight against both threats from the inside and potentially more sophisticated threats from the outside. SolarWinds is committed to helping IT and security teams by equipping them with powerful, affordable solutions that are easy to implement and manage. Good security should be within the reach of all organizations.”

SolarWinds at it-sa, The IT Security Expo and Congress

Booth 127, Hall 9

  • When: October 8 – 10, 2019
  • Where: Nuremberg, Germany

At it-sa, Europe’s largest IT security expo, SolarWinds Head Geek™, Sascha Giese, along with other technical experts, will be onsite to provide in-depth demos of SolarWinds security solutions. These include SolarWinds® Access Rights Manager (ARM), SolarWinds Security Event Manager (SEM), SolarWinds Backup, and SolarWinds Patch Manager—plus a suite of monitoring and management platforms with security baked in, including capabilities for robust endpoint detection and response. These products address the gaps identified by the research findings, including the need for more affordable solutions, technologies that help mitigate skills shortages, a layered approach to security, and solutions that fight threats from both the inside and outside of an organization’s technology infrastructure.

“SolarWinds security solutions help address the gaps identified by the research findings,” stated Sascha Giese. “ARM, for example, helps organizations detect compromises or malicious behavior from inside the company, while helping to drive more effective compliance programs. Nearly two-thirds of tech pros surveyed indicate they already use an access rights management solution, underscoring its importance. At it-sa, I’m looking forward to learning even more about the security pain points of our customers and prospects—so we can do even more to help get them resolved.”

Key Findings

Threat Trends: Internal Users Put Organisations at Risk

Types of cybersecurity threats leading to security incidents within the past 12 months:

  • Out of a variety of security incidents, 80% of respondents attributed the largest portion of cybersecurity threats to internal users making mistakes, while 31% attributed at least a portion to external threat actors; followed by 36% that indicated exposures caused by poor network system and/or application security have led to security incidents.
  • 70% indicated regular employees are the users who pose the biggest risk for insider abuse and/or misuse, followed by privileged IT administrators and executives (45% and 33%, respectively).
  • 45% named poor password management as the most common cause of accidental/careless insider breaches from employees and contractors, while 42% of tech pros surveyed state that sharing passwords is the most common cause, followed by accidentally exposing, deleting, corrupting, and/or modifying critical data and copying data to unsecured devices (40% and 36%, respectively).

The following cybersecurity threats could lead to security incidents in the next 12 months:

  • 55% of respondents are extremely concerned or moderately concerned (combined) about internal users making mistakes that put organisations at risk. This is followed by 50% and 42% indicating exposure caused by poor network system and/or system security and external threat actors infiltrating their organisation’s network and/or systems as the top concerns, respectively.
  • Nearly half of tech pros surveyed are extremely concerned or moderately concerned (combined) that cybercriminals will lead to security incidents in the next twelve months, while one-third of tech pros feel the same about cyberterrorists—and one-fifth of tech pros indicating nation-state actors as top concerns within the same timeframe.

IT Skillsets and Landscape: Not Sufficiently Equipped

  • 89% of tech pros feel unequipped to successfully implement and manage cybersecurity tasks today given their current IT skillset, while over half of tech pros surveyed (54%) feel unequipped to utilize predictive analytics to determine the likelihood of outcomes in their architecture.
  • One-fourth of tech pros feel the most significant barrier to maintaining and improving IT security within their organisation is the complexity of their IT infrastructure, followed by budget constraints (20%), and lack of manpower (19%).
  • 45% of tech pros surveyed have adopted a hybrid approach to their IT security, protecting and managing the security of their own network but also using a managed provider to deliver some security services—while 43% are self-managed and 6% outsource entirely.

Top Security Technologies

  • Top technologies used by technology professionals according to respondents include:
  • Detection:

    • Access rights management (64%)
    • IDS and/ or IPS (48%)
    • Vulnerability assessment (38%)
  • Protection:

    • Email security (77%)
    • Data encryption (70%)
    • Endpoint protection (65%)
    • Patch management (65%)
  • Risk management:

    • Identity governance (58%)
    • Asset management (55%)
    • Governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) (45%)
  • Response and recovery:

    • Backup and recovery (70%)
    • Access rights management (50%)
    • Incident response (37%)

The findings are based on a survey fielded in August/September 2019, which yielded responses from 110 technology practitioners, managers, and directors in Germany from public- and private-sector small, mid-size and enterprise organisations.

Additional Resources

Connect with SolarWinds

Information regarding employment opportunities with SolarWinds Berlin is available at https://solarwinds.jobs/jobs/?location=Germany

#SWIproducts

#SWIsecurity

#SWIresearch

About SolarWinds

SolarWinds (NYSE:SWI) is a leading provider of powerful and affordable IT infrastructure management software. Our products give organizations worldwide, regardless of type, size or IT infrastructure complexity, the power to monitor and manage the performance of their IT environments, whether on-premises, in the cloud, or in hybrid models. We continuously engage with all types of technology professionals—IT operations professionals, DevOps professionals, and managed service providers (MSPs)—to understand the challenges they face maintaining high-performing and highly available IT infrastructures. The insights we gain from engaging with them, in places like our THWACK online community, allow us to build products that solve well-understood IT management challenges in ways that technology professionals want them solved. This focus on the user and commitment to excellence in end-to-end hybrid IT performance management has established SolarWinds as a worldwide leader in network management software and MSP solutions. Learn more today at www.solarwinds.com.

The SolarWinds, SolarWinds & Design, Orion, and THWACK trademarks are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates, are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and may be registered or pending registration in other countries. All other SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos may be common law marks or are registered or pending registration. All other trademarks mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only and are trademarks of (and may be registered trademarks of) their respective companies.

© 2019 SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC. All rights reserved.

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#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
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#computersecurity | Blocking research with China would ‘hurt’, Microsoft boss says

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionWATCH: Satya Nadella on Microsoft’s work in China

Microsoft does more research and development in China than it does anywhere else outside the United States. But, as US-China relations continue to sour on issues of trade and cyber-security, the decades-long ties Microsoft has in China are coming under close scrutiny.

In an interview with BBC News, Microsoft’s chief executive Satya Nadella has said that despite national security concerns, backing out of China would “hurt more” than it solved.

“A lot of AI research happens in the open, and the world benefits from knowledge being open,” he said.

“That to me is been what’s been true since the Renaissance and the scientific revolution. Therefore, I think, for us to say that we will put barriers on it may in fact hurt more than improve the situation everywhere.”

Microsoft’s first office in China was opened by founder and then-chief executive Bill Gates in 1992. Its main location in Beijing now employs more than 200 scientists and involves over 300 visiting scholars and students. It is currently recruiting for, among other roles, researchers in machine learning.

In April, it was reported by the Financial Times that Microsoft researchers were collaborating with teams at China’s National University of Defence Technology, working on artificial intelligence projects that some outside observers warned could be used for oppressive means.

Speaking to the newspaper, Republican Senator Ted Cruz said: “American companies need to understand that doing business in China carries significant and deepening risk.”

He added: “In addition to being targeted by the Chinese Communist party for espionage, American companies are increasingly at risk of boosting the Chinese Communist party’s human rights atrocities.”

Technology as weapon

Mr Nadella acknowledged that risk.

“We know any technology can be a tool or a weapon,” he told the BBC.

“The question is, how do you ensure that these weapons don’t get created? I think there are multiple mechanisms. The first thing is we, as creators, should start with having a set of ethical design principles to ensure that we’re creating AI that’s fair, that’s secure, that’s private, that’s not biased.”

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionMicrosoft’s CEO Satya Nadella spoke to the BBC in 2017: Judge us on value we add, not tax we pay

He said he felt his company had sufficient control over how the controversial emerging technologies are used, and said the firm had turned down requests in China – and elsewhere – to engage in projects it felt were inappropriate, due to either technical infeasibility or ethical concerns.

“We do have control on who gets to use our technology. And we do have principles. Beyond how we build it, how people use it is something that we control through Terms of Use. And we are constantly evolving the terms of use.

“We also recognise whether it’s in the United States, whether it’s in China, whether it’s in the United Kingdom, they will all have their own legislative processes on what they accept or don’t accept, and we will abide by them.”

‘Leaves me wondering…’

Matt Sheehan, from the Paulson Institute, studies the relationship between California’s technology scene and the Chinese economy. He said Microsoft’s efforts, particularly its Beijing office, have had tremendous impact.

“It dramatically advanced the field, advances that have helped the best American and European AI research labs push further,” he said.

“But those same advances feed into the field of computer vision, a key enabler of China’s surveillance apparatus.”

He cites one particular paper as highlighting the complexity of working with, and within, China. Deep Residual Learning for Image Recognition, published in 2016, was a research paper produced by four Chinese researchers working at Microsoft.

According to Google Scholar, which indexes research papers, their paper was cited more than 25,256 times between 2014-2018 – more than any other paper in any other field of research.

“The lead author now works for a US tech company in California,” said Mr Sheehan, referring to Facebook.

“Two other authors work for a company involved in Chinese surveillance. And the last author is trying to build autonomous vehicles in China.

“What do we make of all that? Honestly, it leaves me – and I think it should leave others – scratching their heads and wondering.”

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Follow Dave Lee on Twitter @DaveLeeBBC

Do you have more information about this or any other technology story? You can reach Dave directly and securely through encrypted messaging app Signal on: +1 (628) 400-7370

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Applied Networking Research Workshop (ANRW)

General Cybersecurity Conference

 July 16, 2018 | Montreal, Canada

Cybersecurity Conference Description

The ACM, IRTF & ISOC Applied Networking Research Workshop 2018 (ANRW’18) is an academic workshop that provides a forum for researchers, vendors, network operators, and the Internet standards community to present and discuss emerging results in applied networking research. Our other goal is to create a path for academics to transition research back into the IETF standards and protocols and for academics to find inspiration from topics and open problems addressed at the IETF.

We are particularly interested in topics that focus on wide-area networks and network security, but applied networking topics outside of these focus areas are also welcome.

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Bad #moods weaken #cybersecurity, UD research #says

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Firms like Wilmington’s The Fun Dept. have been saying that happy employees equal more profitable companies for years. Now, according to a report by the University of Delaware’s John D’Arcy, it appears that the crabbier the employees, the less secure their computing behavior.

UDaily’s Sunny Rosen reports on the associate professor’s findings:

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Social Media Research Specialist

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

BBM Staffing – Austin, TX $14 an hour – Full-time, Part-time, Temporary BBM Staffing is currently seeking a Social Media Specialist who will focus on Lead Generation for our client in Downtown Austin. Position: Full Time or Part Time (employee’s choice) Type: Temp-to-hire Pay: $14 an hour Purpose: To research…

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Cybersecurity, blockchain, autonomous research take spotlight in new Virginia technology funding

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cybersecurity, blockchain, autonomous research take spotlight in new Virginia technology funding

The governor’s office announces new awards dedicated to bolstering technology research and commercialization around several emerging markets. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced on Monday that $450,000 of a $2.7 million research fund will be put toward initiatives involving cybersecurity, information technology and drone research. The fund, known as the Commonwealth…

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UNL research finds bullying at all ages

On the border of Texas and Mexico, a young boy in El Paso learned how to navigate an environment of drugs, gangs, divorced parents and bullying. Now he’s a doctoral student and Hack Harassment Campus Ambassador at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His name is Raul Palacios.

Palacios was just nerdy enough to hang with the cool and smart kids and athletic enough to play basketball with the jocks. He found a way to coexist between different groups. He accomplished this until meeting his first bully in middle school.

This bully targeted Palacios, ramming his head against the vending machines and threatening to kill his family.

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What Biosecurity and Cybersecurity Research Have in Common

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Biosecurity and cybersecurity research share an unusual predicament: Efforts to predict and defend against emerging threats often expose and create vulnerabilities. For example, scientists must first learn how to isolate and grow a pathogen before they can develop a new … The post What Biosecurity and […]

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One in four young Aussies experienced bullying in past year: research

One in four young Aussies experienced bullying in past year: research

Australian mental health service ReachOut on Monday urged students, teachers and parents to “act early” to prevent bullying, after it was revealed a quarter of young Australians were bullied in the past 12 months.

ReachOut surveyed 14 to 25-year-olds across the nation, and results showed that one in four had been bullied in the past year.

Just more than half of all reported bullying cases occurred at high school, but, surprisingly, 25 percent of respondents who had been bullied had experienced it at a workplace. A quarter of all incidences also occurred in an online environment.

ReachOut CEO Jono Nicholas told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) that it was important to call out bullying early and at the source.

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