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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | End-of-Life Devices Pose Data Breach Risk

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans End-of-life devices not properly sanitized of data can cause compliance issues and make corporate data vulnerable GDPR, CCPA and the rest of the alphabet soup of privacy laws should have organizations looking more deeply at how and where they store and use data. While most companies […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | But Their Emails: Many 2020 Campaigns Still Risk Phishing Attacks

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Phishing is still a vector to attack presidential campaigns. Many 2020 candidate organizations still aren’t using best practice by implementing a proper DMARC policy.

It seems they’ve not learned from the hack on Hillary’s campaign. In 2016, John Podesta got tricked by a crude phish—and it easily could happen again.

Things are better now, but there’s still acres of room for improvement. In today’s SB Blogwatch, we dig their DNS records.

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment. Not to mention: a decade in three minutes.


Can You Spell DMARC?

What’s the craic, Zack? Mister Whittaker reports—“Only a few 2020 US presidential candidates are using a basic email security feature”:

 DMARC, an email security protocol that verifies the authenticity of a sender’s email and rejects spoofed emails … could prevent a similar attack that hobbled the Democrats during the 2016 election. … Only Elizabeth Warren … Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, Michael Bloomberg, Amy Klobuchar, Cory Booker, Tulsi Gabbard and Steve Bullock have … improved their email security.

The remaining candidates, including … Donald Trump, are not rejecting spoofed emails. … That, experts say, puts their campaigns at risk from foreign influence campaigns and cyberattacks.

In the run-up to the 2016 presidential election, Russian hackers sent an email to Hillary Clinton campaign manager John Podesta, posing as a Google security warning. [It] tricked Podesta into … allowing hackers to steal tens of thousands of private emails.

Or perhaps you prefer a different topical angle? G’day, David Braue—“You may be targeting Black Friday bargains, but cybercriminals are targeting you”:

 Security firms are warning shoppers to be careful online as cybercriminals increase their activity in the runup to [the] retail season. … Shoppers need to be particularly wary of online scams and malware propagated through emails spoofing legitimate retailers.

Despite efforts by the Australian Signals Directorate to promote the use of next-generation DMARC email anti-fraud tools … research suggests that just 45 percent of Australia’s biggest online retailers have actually begun implementing DMARC – and just 10 percent have adopted the strictest level of security.

Returning to this hemisphere, Agari’s Armen Najarian claims, “2020 Presidential Candidates Remain Vulnerable”:

 The kinds of email attacks that helped derail Hillary Clinton’s candidacy in 2016 are only getting more sophisticated. [But some] campaigns are not taking the threat as seriously as they should.

Meanwhile, we’re seeing new trends in how cybercriminals execute … advanced threats, which are liable to throw an entire candidacy off-course. After all, it only requires one campaign employee or volunteer to click on one link in a malicious email.

It’s likely only a matter of time before the unthinkable happens once again. … The Mueller Report … squarely pointed to spear phishing as the primary attack vector for Russian hackers seeking to gain access.

Unfortunately, candidates must not only be concerned about email directed to them and their campaign staff. … Imagine the damage that can be done by emails that appear to come from the legitimate domain of the candidate, but actually come from a malicious criminal who uses that domain to spread false information to potential … donors, voters, and the media.

This is entirely possible, and likely even probable, unless candidates take the steps they need to protect against it by implementing DMARC with a p=reject policy.

DMARC: HOWTO? Chad Calease obliges—“A Definitive Guide”:

 This is the time of year we’re all too aware how much phishing really sucks. … While technology isn’t able to catch all of it 100% of the time, DMARC is one of these important layers of defense that helps to dramatically minimize the amount of phishing emails that get through to our inboxes.

DMARC stands for Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance. [It] is a set of 3 DNS records that work together to ensure email is sent only from authorized … mail servers, thereby helping block fraudulent messages.

DMARC sets a clear policy for what to do if a message hasn’t been sent from an authorized source. … DMARC helps prevent criminals from spoofing the “header from” or “reply-to” address: … First it checks that the DKIM … digital signature is a match. Then it checks the SPF record to ensure the message came from an authorized server. If both DKIM and SPF pass these checks, DMARC delivers the message.

But if one or more of these tests fails, DMARC behaves according to a policy we set:

‘none’ [which] doesn’t impose any actions …
‘quarantine’ [which] Flags messages … to be directed to the recipients’ spam or junk folders …
‘reject’ [which] outright refuses messages that fail … (this is the end goal of a good DMARC configuration).

OK, so why aren’t all the candidates on board? Here’s lostphilosopher:

 I see this as a reflection of the candidates ability to find and listen to experts. I don’t expect a candidate to understand how to do tech “right” – I’m in the industry and still get half of it wrong! However, when you’re running a multi million dollar campaign you can afford to bring in experts to set this stuff up and audit your practices.

I assume these candidates are already doing this and that if they are still not following some basic best practices it’s because they are actively ignoring the experts. … That’s what worries me: If they can’t find or listen to these people now, what makes me think they’ll be able to in office?

And this Anonymous commentator agrees:

 Think about this for a second! If the … candidates don’t care enough about their own email traffic, why would anyone vote for them to secure this nation? If your own private info is easily up for grabs, what do you honestly think national security would be like under any of them?

But gl4ss spots an oint in the flyment:

 If you rely on DMARC … and just trust it blindly then you know what? You’re gonna get ****ed by someone on whthouse.org.co.uk.acva.com.

Sure the email is sent from that domain, but so what? The domain isn’t right.

It was ever thus. Ryan Dunbar—@ryandunbar2—looks back:

 In 1980 we knew internet email was not secure.
2003 get email SPF
2007 get email DKIM
2012 get DMARC
2019 get ARC, BIMI
2025 get QUIC, yet email will still not be secure.
2050 get internet3
Why does it look like the ones running the internet don’t want a secure internet?

Meanwhile, El Duderino knows who to blame:

 This is Al Gore’s fault because he invented the internet.

And Finally:

10 Years; 100 songs; 3 minutes

Previously in And Finally


You have been reading SB Blogwatch by Richi Jennings. Richi curates the best bloggy bits, finest forums, and weirdest websites… so you don’t have to. Hate mail may be directed to @RiCHi or sbbw@richi.uk. Ask your doctor before reading. Your mileage may vary. E&OE.

Image source: Tia Dufour (public domain)

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The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> But Their Emails: Many 2020 Campaigns Still Risk Phishing Attacks <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | These 4 Tips Will Make You Fluent in Cyber Risk

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Understanding the Security Gap
According to a recent report by the Advanced Cyber Security Center, 91% of organizations…

The post These 4 Tips Will Make You Fluent in Cyber Risk appeared first on ZeroNorth.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Blog | ZeroNorth authored by ZeroNorth. Read the original post at: https://www.zeronorth.io/blog/these-4-tips-will-make-you-fluent-in-cyber-risk/

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The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> These 4 Tips Will Make You Fluent in Cyber Risk <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#deepweb | Hackers are stealing loyalty rewards. Are your air miles or hotel points at risk?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

American consumers love loyalty programs. It’s estimated that the 3.3 billion loyalty program members in the U.S. currently store about $48 billion worth of points and miles in their accounts, according to Chargebacks911. These programs have grown so large in recent years that they’ve become an inviting target for hackers.

“It’s a huge problem and getting bigger,” said Brett Johnson, a former cyber-thief who turned his life around and became a digital security consultant after spending six years in prison. “Rewards points are a goldmine for crooks. They’re easy to access, very easy to use or transfer, and victims rarely check their accounts, so criminals flock to this type of crime without fear of consequences.”

While we call them miles or points, loyalty rewards are really a form of digital currency that can be used just like cash. Because they’re so liquid, the hackers don’t have to book flights or hotel stays with them. They can buy gift cards or merchandise to resell online, or they can simply sell the stolen rewards to other criminals.

Electronic gift cards are the favorite way to turn loyalty rewards into cash, said Peter R. Maeder, secretary and cofounder of the Loyalty Security Association.

“The opportunities for criminals in the loyalty area are tremendous,” Maeder told NBC News BETTER from his home-base of Switzerland. “Crooks talk to one another and the word is out that they can make easy money very quickly this way, and there’s not a lot of danger of being caught.”

Scammers always look for soft targets, and loyalty accounts are relatively easy to attack.

“They are incredibly insecure,” said John Breyault at Fraud.org (a public service of the National Consumers League). “Typically, they usually don’t have two-factor authentication; they’re only protected by an e-mail address and password. That’s just like leaving your front door unlocked to cyberthieves, who can get in easily and make money off of your miles or points.”

While travel rewards are a prime target for hackers, any loyalty program where the rewards are accessed digitally is at risk. Loyalty programs at McDonald’s, Domino’s and Buffalo Wild Wings have all been hacked, the New York Times reported.

How much are stolen rewards worth?

There’s a vibrant market for stolen miles and points and loyalty reward program login credentials on the ‘dark web’, the online black market where criminals shop.

“They can just go shopping for what they want,” said Kevin Lee, digital trust and safety architect at Sift, a digital security company. The dark web, Lee says, is “essentially like an Amazon marketplace where you can find rewards for hotel chains and airlines.”

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NBC News BETTER asked Lee to check the dark web so he could give us an idea of what these rewards are selling for right now. Turns out, they’re a steal (pun intended). He found:

  • 900,000 Marriott points (value $1,125) selling for only $270.
  • 44,000 Hilton points (worth $450) selling for just $20.
  • 2,000 Jet Blue miles ($75 to buy from the airline) selling for $2.50.

“They’re cheap and you aggregate lots of these different accounts together and then funnel them into one account and buy a plane ticket or redeem them for other rewards,” Lee said.

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The post #deepweb | <p> Hackers are stealing loyalty rewards. Are your air miles or hotel points at risk? <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Cyber Risk Update for Construction Companies | Stoel Rives – Global Privacy & Security Blog®

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Updated: May 25, 2018:

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#city | #ransomware | 90pc of UK’s biggest law firms at risk of having confidential client data stolen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Around nine in 10 of the UK’s biggest law firms are at risk of being scammed or having their clients’ confidential data stolen or compromised due to sub-standard IT security. A new study of 200 of the country’s biggest law firms found more than 90pc are […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#infosec | #ISC2Congress: IoT Devices Pose Off-Network Security Risk

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Internet of Things (IoT) devices can still be a serious security threat even when they are off network.

Speaking on day three of the (ISC)² Security Congress in Orlando, Florida, 802 Secure CSO Michael Raggo shared research that demonstrated the risks posed by everyday IoT devices. 

In his talk titled “Cyber Physical Security: Addressing IoT Risks,” Raggo cited examples of threat actors gaining access to data centers via WiFi thermostats and spying on conferences by hacking into smart TVs mounted on boardroom walls.

“The problem goes far above and beyond the potential breach of data or risks to that data. It also has an impact on safety, privacy, and the whole operation of your entire network, especially if it’s an industrial IoT type of network,” said Raggo.

“What that means in terms of your policies and how you approach the problem, is that this is more than just protecting data and avoiding data exfiltration. Now we are talking about the safety and the privacy of people and employees.”

The impact of IoT security issues is far-reaching. According to Raggo, “roughly 50% of the new buildings being built in the United States have some kind of IoT functionality.”

Raggo said that ensuring the reliability and security of the lighting, power, and HVAC systems of your home and your business is a real challenge if those systems aren’t connected to your own network.

Although many people are familiar with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, according to Raggo they often don’t have a clear understanding of how IoT devices are configured and who can actually connect to them.   

Raggo referenced experiments conducted in his own lab that had produced worrying results, exposing vulnerabilities in smartphones and surveillance cameras. In one test, he used a wireless thumb drive to access data on a hub.

“I simply plugged it into a USB port in the back of the hub and immediately videos started being recorded to my thumb drive. There was no authentication required,” said Raggo.

One threat Raggo drew attention to was Bluetooth skimming, where threat actors steal money by breaching credit card details used in transactions. After being asked to investigate a fast-food restaurant that had suffered a breach, Raggo used readily available Bluetooth scanning tools to detect a long-range Bluetooth device placed under the cash register that had been used to skim data.

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#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Managing Risk During an M&A

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Build cybersecurity due diligence processes into your M&A strategy to protect your organization against security risks

A merger or acquisition can introduce security risks, sometimes years after the transaction is finalized. In the case of Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels & Resorts, it took two years for Marriott to discover that there had been unauthorized access to Starwood’s guest reservation database, with breaches occurring since 2014. The security breach exposed the personal information of 383 million customers and has cost Marriott $72 million to date, with additional costs expected.

During an M&A, ensuring that proper security procedures are in place often gets overlooked, as was the case in the Starwood acquisition. Adding cybersecurity risk assessment as part of your M&A due diligence is critical to protect your organization. Here are some steps to consider.

Leadership Support for Due Diligence During M&A

Support in the form of an organization-wide policy from senior management is critical when developing a cybersecurity due diligence program. Once the policy is approved, ensure that appropriate resources and budget are available for the program.

During the M&A process, leadership must emphasize to both organizations the importance of cybersecurity due diligence, making it clear this step must be completed before the close of the transaction. 

Data Mapping

Data mapping can help you identify data handling processes and controls that may need to be strengthened and/or opportunities to anonymize or delete sensitive data. Interviews and/or questionnaires can help you quickly identify how and where the target company processes, transmits and/or stores sensitive data (e.g. PII, credit card numbers, health information) and how that data is protected and regulated, depending on the industry. It’s important to understand how sensitive data comes in to the target company, moves throughout the company, and whether or not data is sent to third parties.

Cybersecurity Practices Questionnaire

Require the target company to complete a short questionnaire (ideally 50 questions or less) detailing their cybersecurity best practices. The Center for Internet Security’s Critical Security Controls (CIS CSC) is a good example. The questionnaire is a quick and effective way to discover how mature the target company’s cybersecurity practices are and whether there are major risks such as stored sensitive data not being encrypted. The questionnaire also gives you the chance to identify areas where you might need to follow up or dig more deeply.

Focus on critical cybersecurity controls such as encryption of stored sensitive data, system patching, privilege management and logging. Ask whether the target company has experienced any recent security breaches, if the company’s cybersecurity program is based on a best practices framework (e.g., CIS CSC, NIST, CSF) and to identify all third parties such as MSSPs that provide cybersecurity services.

If the target company has had a recent third-party assessment of their cybersecurity practices (e.g., SSAE18, PCI DSS), request the full assessment report and review it thoroughly. Such assessments are performed by third-party experts and their reports are full of useful information.

Risk-Scoring Tool

Develop a risk-scoring tool to quantify the target company’s level of cybersecurity risk (high, medium, low), per the results of their data mapping and cybersecurity questionnaire. A typical approach is to assign scores (1, 2, 3) to specific questionnaire responses and data mapping findings, then combine all the individual scores into an overall cybersecurity risk score.

Base the tool on the factors that are most important and relevant to your organization, such as how much sensitive data is stored at the target company, whether the company has had a recent security breach or whether it sends sensitive data to third parties, for example. The tool is an easy to use and effective way to communicate to your senior management the cybersecurity risk of the target company.

There’s an inherent risk with any M&A transaction and creating a merger and acquisition cybersecurity due diligence program requires time and effort. But in the long run, it’s a great way to reduce your cybersecurity risk, helping to minimize the chance of post-transaction security breaches.

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How to #Build a #Cybersecurity Risk #Management #Framework

Source: National Cyber Security News

When our country’s businesses are safe, our nation is safe. That’s the message that former President Obama gave when he talked about his executive order on “Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity” in his 2013 State of the Union address. Just a year later, the Obama administration launched the “Cybersecurity Framework,” which is a guide on enhancing cybersecurity developed by the private sector.

The cybersecurity infrastructures of our country’s businesses support national efforts toward economic security, public safety and health safety. The infrastructures of cybersecurity also affect our businesses’ bottom lines, profitability margins and reputations.

Regardless of their risk profiles or size, all companies should build a foundation of cybersecurity risk management based on good business principles and best practices.

Getting Started on a Risk Management Framework

There are many aspects to running a business. The issue of cybersecurity doesn’t usually make the top 10 list of priorities unless a problem rises to the surface that companies can’t ignore. At best, cybersecurity is often a knee-jerk reaction to a problem or new regulation. At worst, it’s an afterthought.

In today’s corporate world, companies need a well-thought-out, strategic plan for cybersecurity to protect themselves and everyone else from potential sources of harm.

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Cyber #Risk — Next #Steps For #Evolving #Security?

Source: National Cyber Security News

Richard M. Frankel served for more than 25 years in public service, and the majority of his career has been with the FBI. Serving as Of Counsel at Ruskin Moscou Faltischek P.C., Frankel’s practice focuses on Cyber Security and White Collar Crime & Investigations. A recognized authority in complex investigations, asset recovery, cyber issues and crisis management, Frankel also provides regular insight on terrorism, criminal and intelligence related matters. He has extensive experience in understanding as well as investigating complex coordinated attacks. Frankel led several FBI field divisions as the Special Agent In-Charge.

Nicole Della Ragione is an Associate at Ruskin Moscou Faltischek, P.C., where she is a member of the firm’s Health Law Department, Cyber Security and Data Privacy Practice Group and the White Collar Crime and Investigations Practice Group. Since joining the firm, Della Ragione’s practice has focused in the cyber security arena as well as federal and state litigation. She has been engaged in numerous cyber security engagements ranging across industries and of all sizes. Her work includes advising businesses based on their level of cyber-preparedness and conducting risk and threat assessments, incident response planning and more.


Christopher P.

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