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#deepweb | Has Samsung learned from their Galaxy Fold bendy mistakes?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Dreaming deep, sound asleep

As machines become increasingly intelligent, they are also becoming more artistic.

Google’s Deep Dream is making a huge splash on the web. It was originally coded by Alexander Mordvintsev, a programmer working in security systems who liked to play around with artificial intelligence as a side project. In the middle of the night last May, he discovered the lines of code that would cause Google’s neural net to generate original images that look like a psychedelic combination of Salvador Dalí and Lisa Frank. He posted his images on Google’s internal Google + account, and was soon paired with young programmer Chris Olah and software engineer/sculptor Mike Tyka to develop Deep Dream.

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REM for your RAM

The Deep Dream team has created an entire gallery of surrealistic art. Animal parts of different species combine to form fantastical beasts, backgrounds fill with swirling patterns, and spiders emerge from cloudless skies.

In July, the Deep Dream team released the software on GitHub so that the general public could turn their family portraits and vacation photos into bizarre art pieces. New apps are popping up, several grotesque portraits of presidential candidates have been produced, and the band Wilco used a Deep Dream image on the cover of its latest album. Samim Winiger, who created software that makes animations from Deep Dream images, says that “in five years we won’t recognize Photoshop,” alluding to the possibility for Deep Dream technology to become a major feature in our visual world.

But is there more to it?

Winiger refers to Deep Dream as “creative AI [artificial intelligence].” But can a computer be said to have creativity? The dreamlike (or, at times, nightmarish) quality of Deep Dream images has certainly caused some observers to posit that Deep Dream is pulling images from the “subconscious” of Google’s mind. But a computer, no matter how smart, is not a brain. So is Deep Dream just the robot equivalent of a cool party trick?

Deep learning in the neural net

But Deep Dream wasn’t created just to blow our minds with freakish four-eyed kittens and giant tarantulas crawling from the sky. It’s also a useful way for programmers to study artificial intelligence. Computers can now achieve what programmers call “deep learning” by processing information through a neural net (NN). Neural nets are meshes of artificial neurons layered one over the other, like spider webs. Information is passed through several layers of the NN, and each layer analyzes it from a different angle. The topmost layer is responsible for the output of information that has been “learned” by deeper layers of the net.

Google has made great strides towards teaching its neural net to visually recognize objects by having it produce an image of whatever it’s viewing, which is then graded for accuracy and fed back into the computer, giving the NN an opportunity to learn from its mistakes and eventually come to automatically correct itself.

Layered learning, and pattern detecting

So far, it has been hard for researchers to really know for sure what is happening at each layer of the neural net. But a researcher can have a computer produce a Deep Dream image from a specific layer of its neural net, thus revealing exactly what that layer is learning. In this way, researchers are discovering more about what happens inside an artificial mind.

What researchers have found is that computers may have higher perception and better pattern-recognition than humans. It’s like having a highly imaginative child watch clouds. If a cloud looks a little bit like a ship, the neural net will run the image through a feedback loop until a highly detailed ship emerges. This is why Deep Dream is able to create images even out of random noise – it can detect patterns that a human wouldn’t even notice.

This has far-reaching implications for how artificial intelligence may eventually replace humans. For example, researchers are using neural nets to read ultrasounds, detecting tumors invisible to the human eye.

Final thoughts

So, is artificial intelligence becoming creative? Is a computer an artist? That depends on how you define creativity, and where you draw the line between the “real” and the “artificial.” But Deep Dream engineer Mike Tyka is impressed: “If you think about human creativity, some small component of that is the ability to take impressions and recombine them in interesting, unexpected ways,” – the same ability Deep Dream displays.

Regardless of whether or not this is true “creativity,” the world seems to agree with Tyka that when you let a computer come up with original art, “it’s cool.”

Steven Levy was granted the first interview with the Deep Dream team. You can read his report at Medium.com.

#DeepDream

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#comptia | Samsung hopes 5G will save its slumping profits this year

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung Electronics just released fourth-quarter earnings that told much the same story as the rest of 2019. Revenue was more or less flat year-on-year — up 1 percent to 59.9 trillion won ($50.7 billion) — while operating profit slid 34 percent to 7.1 trillion won ($6 billion).

The primary reason for the decline remains the fall in prices of memory chips, Samsung’s biggest profit driver in recent years. The display panel business also saw profits fall year-on-year due to weak demand. The mobile division, on the other hand, did better than a year ago, with Samsung calling out “solid” flagship sales and the profitability of phones like the Galaxy A series.

Samsung is hoping that the wider adoption of 5G in 2020 will improve its numbers more or less across the board. The 5G upgrade cycle is likely to help the mobile division, of course, but Samsung notes it should be able to increase memory sales to handset manufacturers and data center companies. The company also plans to develop integrated 5G chips for mass-market smartphones, and expects demand for its OLED displays and high-resolution phone camera sensors to increase.

Samsung cautions, however, that the “actual pace of 5G expansion … remains to be seen,” which probably isn’t the last time we’ll hear that in a tech company’s forecasts this year. How that shakes out in practice is going to have a major effect on Samsung in particular over the next year, since so many areas of its business are involved directly or indirectly.

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Samsung Smart TV flaw leaves devices open to hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung Smart TV flaw leaves devices open to hackers

Your Samsung Smart TV might be pretty dumb.

Penetration testing firm Neseso has found that a 32-inch Tizen-based smart TV, first released as part of the 2015 model year and still being sold in North America, isn’t authenticating devices that connect to it via Wi-Fi Direct.

Rather than requiring a password or PIN to authenticate devices that want to connect to the TV – like, say, your smartphone when you want to use it as a remote control – it’s relying on a whitelist of devices that the user’s already authorized.

To do that, Samsung’s Smart TV uses devices’ media access control (MAC) addresses. Those are like a digital fingerprint: a MAC address is constant to a piece of hardware (though it can be spoofed, either for legitimate purposes or by a thief who wants to hide it).

Neseso says a user will be notified about a whitelist device that connects to their Smart TV, but that’s it: if the device is on a whitelist, the TV will just lay out the welcome mat without requiring any authentication.

It’s easy for an attacker to get a whitelisted MAC address, Neseso said. In fact, a few years ago, we saw a US cop sniffing out stolen gadgets by MAC addresses, wardriving in his squad car with some software he rigged up to a thumb drive sized-antenna that plugs into the car’s USB port and looking for MAC addresses that matched those listed in a database of known stolen devices.

After an attacker spoofs a known MAC address, they’d be able to access all the services on the Smart TV, such as remote control service.

An attacker would have to know, ahead of time, the MAC address of, say, your smartphone’s Wi-Fi chip. They’ll also likely have to crouch outside in your shrubbery – given that Wi-Fi Direct doesn’t work over long distances – while clutching their laptop or smartphone to spoof that MAC address and start messing with channel-changing or screen mirroring.

OK, so an attacker can change your channel. Annoying, but hardly earth-shattering, eh? Well, it doesn’t stop with the remote exploitation of channel-surfing. An attacker could use it as a springboard to gain access to whatever network the Smart TV is connected to, Neseso said.

Would an attacker be able to get at your home Wi-Fi network’s name and password? Not necessarily through this Wi-Fi Direct vulnerability. But as another security researcher revealed a few weeks ago, the operating system running on millions of Samsung products – it’s called Tizen – is what Motherboard referred to as a hacker’s dream.

Israeli researcher Amihai Neiderman:

Everything you can do wrong there, they do it. You can see that nobody with any understanding of security looked at this code or wrote it. It’s like taking an undergraduate and letting him program your software.
We’ve certainly heard of Samsung vulnerabilities before. In fact, last month, WikiLeaks published documents that purportedly showed how the CIA can monitor people through their Samsung Smart TVs.

Neseso contacted Samsung starting last month, with the Korean company eventually saying that it didn’t consider the find to be a security vulnerability. That’s why Neseso decided to publish details about it on Full Disclosure, it said.

The security outfit advised Samsung Smart TV owners to remove all their whitelisted devices and to avoid using the WiFi-Direct feature. It didn’t explain precisely how to do that, instead telling users to directly contact Samsung. You might want to poke around in the Network menu under Settings or simply disable Wi-Fi on your smart TV… though that would rob you of all those smart TV features you paid for.

Neseso didn’t test other Samsung models, but it suggested that they too might be vulnerable.

Short of disabling Wi-Fi, we’d suggest keeping an eye out for rustling shrubbery. If your TV channels start changing, call the police and then, by all means, switch off your TV’s Wi-Fi.

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Patched ‘KNOXout’ Samsung Exploit Offered Control To Hackers

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Patched ‘KNOXout’ Samsung Exploit Offered Control To Hackers

Traditionally, one of the bigger benefits of buying a Samsung device was security. This was mostly thanks to the Knox software, a special multi-faceted security suite that included a number of tools to keep Samsung owners from having to feel

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Samsung Galaxy S5’s fingerprint scanner fails to live up to security standards

The much-hyped fingerprint scanner on Samsung’s latest flagship handset the Galaxy S5 has already been hacked just days after the device was launched, although a teardown reveals a bill of materials in excess of $250 (£150) – higher than the iPhone 5S.

Researchers at Germany’s Security Research Labs (SRLabs) publicised their findings in a YouTube clip. According to the narrator: “the spoof was made under lab conditions but is based on nothing more than a camera phone photo of an unprocessed latent print on a smartphone screen.”
A PCB mold is then made from the photo, into which wood glue is smeared to make the dummy fingerprint.

The hack is concerning given that it grants access to “highly sensitive apps” such as PayPal, giving “a would-be attacker an even greater incentive to learn the simple skill of fingerprint spoofing”, the researchers said.

According to the researchers Samsung has executed the fingerprint authentication quite poorly and has failed to learn from the mistakes of other tech companies which have gone before it in trying to implement effective biometric authentication systems. Unlike the Apple device, the S5 currently does not require a password to authenticate after a certain number of incorrect attempts to swipe in. This means attackers can theoretically have as many goes as they like as long as they reboot the handset every so often.

This kind of oversight is surprising considering the amount of money Samsung has spent on building its latest star handset.

The fingerprint scanner is not broken out by cost although the market analyst claimed that the S5 has more sensors “than IHS has ever detected in a smartphone design”.

Source: http://whogothack.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/samsung-galaxy-s5-fingerprint-scanner.html#.Vj5jOPmqqko

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Samsung says its mobile payments data is safe despite hack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung Electronics has said its mobile payment system is safe after a hacking attack against its US-based subsidiary LoopPay. An article in the New York Times on Wednesday said the hacking incident had occurred against LoopPay’s network in March. LoopPay, acquired by Samsung in February, developed the payment system used to run Samsung Pay – a competitor to Apple Pay. Samsung said user data was not at risk. In August, the Korean electronics giant launched its mobile wallet serviceSamsung Pay in South Korea, followed by a launch in the US in September. Samsung Pay competes against rival Apple’s pay facility, which launched last year and operates in the US and UK. Google offers a similar payment system. The mobile phone payment systems are designed to convince shoppers to use their handsets to make in-store purchases – rather than using cards. The New York Times article says Chinese hackers – the so-called Codoso Group – gained access to LoopPay’s office network and were not discovered until five months later in August. Samsung said its payment system “was not impacted and at no point was any personal payment information at risk”. The firm said it was an “isolated incident” and stressed that […]

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Careful what you say, your Samsung TV is listening

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung has admitted its televisions can transmit user data to third-parties, including overheard conversations, making it the latest technology company to face a backlash for how data is collected from users. The world’s biggest maker of TVs said its Web-connected sets can collect private conversations when users activate its voice-recognition function. Consumers can turn the function on or off at any time, the company said in an e-mailed statement. The data collection practices on Samsung’s TVs are contained in the user agreements, the so-called click-to-agree screen found during the setup of most modern technology. Google, LinkedIn, and Yahoo! have been sued by customers over how they collect data while Apple last year updated privacy policies to reassure users that their data is safe. “If you’re watching TV, TV should not be watching you back,” Julia Horwitz, a consumer protection counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center, told Bloomberg Television. “Consumers, like the company, don’t know what will happen after the data is collected.” When a user gives a voice command to a Web-connected TV, the data is sent to a server to search for the requested content, Samsung said. In a supplemental TV note posted on its website, the company […]

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Samsung teams with Centrify to bolster Knox anti-hacker defences

Samsung teams with Centrify to bolster Knox anti-hacker defences

Samsung has partnered with Centrify to create a sweep of upgrades for its Knox security service. The partnership means Centrify’s security systems will power Samsung Knox’s cloud-based identity and access management (IAM) and Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) cloud-based services. The […]

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ZixCorp unveils ZixOne on the Samsung Solutions Exchange

Top Priority Sector:  cyber_security Dallas, TX-based Zix Corporation (ZixCorp), a provider of email data protection, has announced that

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