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Germany heads towards tightening restrictions after the rise in Corona injuries… | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Germany heads towards tightening restrictions after the rise in Corona injuries… | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | Parent Security Online ✕ VIEW […] View full post on National Cyber Security

1000s In PA Counties Uncounted, With 5 Days Left For 2020 Census | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

[ad_1] CHESTER COUNTY — Thousands of residents of Chester, Montgomery, Delaware, and other counties still have not responded to the U.S. 2020 Census, and that will mean lost federal revenue […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Shelton BOE Approves 7 On 7 High School Football | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

[ad_1] SHELTON, CT — The Shelton Board of Education approved plans 7 on 7 high school football. The Southern Connecticut Conference still has to decide if it wants to go that route. The board didn’t decide if school equipment could be used in a private league, according to the Shelton Herald. There could be some […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Nearly 4,000 new students at Catholic schools in Boston, 700 in Springfield as they field calls from parents wanting in person learning | #Education | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Nearly 4,000 new students at Catholic schools in Boston, 700 in Springfield as they field calls from parents wanting in person learning | #Education | Parent Security Online […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#childsafety | Should Ofsted visit schools in England when they reopen? | Education | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

As parents and teachers worry about school safety, Ofsted, the schools watchdog, will start a “phased return” to inspections in September, starting with all schools graded “inadequate”, plus a sample […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#schoolsafety | Cops in Syracuse schools: friendly face or occupying force? Their future debated | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

Syracuse, N.Y. — In 2008, a police officer assigned to Corcoran High School broke a 15-year-old girl’s nose after he punched her in the face. The officer said the girl […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#school | #ransomware | Cybersecurity incidents at schools nearly triple in 2019

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Public K-12 education agencies across the nation reported 348 cybersecurity incidents during 2019—nearly three times as many incidents as were publicly disclosed during 2018.

A report from the K-12 Cybersecurity Resource Center, The State of K-12 Cybersecurity: 2019 Year in Review,  says many of these incidents caused significant problems. They resulted  in the theft of millions of  dollars, stolen identities, and the denial of access to school technology systems for weeks or longer.

Student and educator data breaches were the most commonly experienced type of incident in 2019. More than half of these were because of the actions of insiders to the school community, including edtech vendors and other third-party partners. The next most frequent type of cyber incident experienced by schools during 2019 was ransomware.

Data for the report comes from publicly disclosed incidents cataloged on the K-12 Cyber Incident Map. The map and underlying database capture detailed information about two inter-related issues:

  • publicly disclosed cybersecurity incidents affecting public K-12 schools, districts, charter schools, and other public education agencies (such as regional and state education agencies) in the 50 states and Washington, D.C.
  • the characteristics of public school districts (including charter schools) that have experienced one or more publicly disclosed cybersecurity incidents.

The 348 incidents in 2019 involved 336 education agencies across 44 states; 329 of those involved regular public school districts. Suburban districts were the more common target (44.31%), followed by rural (22.75%).

Schools from the Northeast were victimized most often (33.93%), followed by the Central region (27.08%), West (25%) and Southeast (13.99%).

Since 2016, the K-12 Cyber Incident Map has documented more than 775 publicly disclosed incidents affecting students and educators.

Although acknowledging that the odds of experiencing an incident appear to vary by school district characteristics, the report stresses that the resource center “has documented school districts of every size and type that have experienced data breaches, phishing attacks, and ransomware/malware outbreak.”

“School district leaders would do well to understand that no school district is safe from a potential incident,” the report recommends.

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#school | #ransomware | Commentary: Cybersecurity breaches at Texas schools cost taxpayers millions

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

According to data assembled by the K-12 Cybersecurity Resource Center, no state has experienced a greater number of publicly disclosed school cybersecurity incidents in recent years than Texas. These incidents have resulted in the theft of millions of taxpayer dollars, widespread destruction and outages of school IT systems, and large-scale identity theft.

Consider that Manor Independent School District lost $2.3 million in a targeted email phishing scam in January. In similar attacks last year, nearly $2 million was stolen from Crowley ISD, while Henderson ISD lost more than $600,000.

Malicious actors have employed other digital weapons, such as ransomware, to extort money from at least a half dozen Texas districts since 2017. The most recent incident, in Port Neches-Groves ISD, resulted in a $35,000 bitcoin payment to cybercriminals in exchange for the digital keys to restore access to the district’s IT systems. And school vendors such as Pearson have experienced large-scale breaches of student data at the same time that thousands of Texas educators and administrators have had their identities and personal bank accounts emptied by cyberthieves.

Given that schools’ reliance on technology for teaching, learning and operations will continue to grow, trustees and administrators should embrace their responsibility to safeguard their school communities from emerging digital threats.

The passage of Senate Bill 820 by the Texas Legislature encourages school districts to put in place commonsense security controls, but it falls short of guaranteeing such controls will be implemented effectively or in proportion to the threats facing districts.

If school trustees and administrators are to make real progress in managing cybersecurity risks, they will need to foster better information-sharing and cooperation across districts; make the case in their communities for spending time and resources on building cybersecurity awareness, tooling and expertise; and embrace the legislative requirement to develop meaningful cybersecurity policies and plans.

While there is variability in how school districts use and rely on technology, there are more similarities in terms of security challenges than differences. Since cybercriminals target school districts nationwide with the same scams, it is imperative IT leaders in school districts collaborate. Indeed, one of the biggest challenges in responding to these threats is the veil of secrecy surrounding school cybersecurity.

Any meaningful response to the issue will also require more money and more expertise. While state — and even federal — resources would undoubtedly help, school districts will likely have to look for other funding and sources of support. Students, parents and teachers should all be allies in this cause.

While educational technology offers exciting opportunities for students and teachers, its use introduces new risks. While the passage of SB 820 is laudable, it is only one step in a much longer journey to keep Texas school districts cybersecure. In the end, we won’t see fewer successful phishing attacks, fewer ransomware incidents or fewer data breaches until all superintendents and trustees jointly embrace their cybersecurity governance responsibilities.

Doug Levin is president and founder of the K-12 Cybersecurity Resource Center (k12cybersecure.com), which was launched in 2018 to shed light on the emerging cybersecurity risks facing public schools.

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#school | #ransomware | Ransomware attacks prompt push for US schools cybersecurity bill

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

We do need an education

With schools across the US increasingly falling prey to ransomware attacks, two US senators are calling for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to create a set of guidelines to help schools improve their cybersecurity systems.

Senators Gary Peters, a Democrat representing Michigan, and Rick Scott, a Republican for Florida, have introduced a bill instructing the DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) to examine schools’ security risks and challenges.

The K-12 Cybersecurity Act of 2019 (PDF) would also require CISA to create a set of cybersecurity recommendations and online tools for schools over the next year.

The tools would be designed to educate officials about the new recommendations and suggest strategies for implementing them.

There’s no detail on what these recommendations and tools might be, and no funding has been allocated.

However, the bill is similar in principle to the State and Local Government Cybersecurity Improvement Act, recently passed by the Senate, which would see the DHS’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) providing state and local officials with access to security tools and procedures and carrying out joint cybersecurity exercises.

“Schools across the country are entrusted with safeguarding the personal data of their students and faculty, but lack many of [the] resources and information needed to adequately defend themselves against sophisticated cyber-attacks,” said Peters.

“This common-sense, bipartisan legislation will help to ensure that schools in Michigan and across the country can protect themselves from hackers looking to take advantage of our nation’s cybersecurity vulnerabilities.”

Off syllabus

Over the last few years, there has been an increasing number of ransomware attacks on US public sector organisations, including schools.

Data from cloud security firm Armor shows that 72 school districts or individual educational institutions have publicly reported being a victim of ransomware this year, with 1,039 schools impacted.

Connecticut saw seven school districts hit, while Louisiana went so far as to declare a state of emergency after schools across the north of the state were hit by malware in July. The Rockville Centre, New York, school district, paid out nearly $100,000 after being hit by the Ryuk ransomware in August.

Indeed, according to research from Malwarebytes, education was the top target for trojan malware during the 2018-2019 school year, and the most-detected threat category for all businesses in 2018 and early 2019. Adware, trojans, and backdoors were the three most common threats, with ransomware attacks soaring by 365% in the year to Q2 2019.

Schools are particularly easy targets, as they tend to be short on funding and often have outdated systems.

Adam Kujawa, a director of Malwarebytes Labs, told The Daily Swig: “Education organizations face several issues in reference to securing networks that many private businesses don’t deal with.

“For example, the increased opportunity for infection due to endpoints being spread across a campus, being accessed by both student and staff, many of which can affect the security of that endpoint and possibly the entire network with careless use – opening malware – or intentional malice.

“Overall, this kind of environment shouldn’t be treated as any other organization, so I am glad they are doing a study first to identify the unique problems educational networks deal with. We will have to wait and see if the results of this study – the tools developed and made available – will be effective or even deployed across the board.”

RELATED Ryuk ransomware implicated in City of New Orleans shutdown

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#hacking | Hacking should be taught in schools ‘like sport’ to stop children becoming criminals, says Lauri Love 

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hacking and other cybersecurity skills should be taught in schools in a similar way to sports, said alleged hacker Lauri Love.

The activist, who won a legal battle in 2018 to block his extradition to the US over allegations that he hacked into computer networks including NASA, the Federal Reserve and the US Army, said schools in the UK need to be more sophisticated in the way they teach technical skills to students.

“We need to treat this a bit like we treat sport,” Mr Love said at an event in London run by cybersecurity business Redscan.

Mr Love said that students should be given a “structured, controlled environment” to learn cybersecurity skills in order to stop them engaging in criminal behaviour….

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