secretly

now browsing by tag

 
 

How to #Know If Your #Slow #Computer Is #Secretly #Mining #Cryptocurrency

Mining cryptocurrency used to require thousands of dollars worth of equipment to see any kind of meaningful return, but not anymore. Newer digital currencies like Monero, ByteCoin, and AEON have given would-be miners the ability to mine tokens right from their laptops. This might benefit small-time miners that want to get involved in the sector, but for every good thing online there are always people that figure out a way to use it for bad.

Hackers have begun using these tools to infect computers and websites to secretly mine cryptocurrencies. This emerging type of malware attack has been dubbed as “cryptojacking”, and it could cause your computer to overheat and crash. Luckily, spotting these hidden miners isn’t all that difficult.

Cryptojacking essentially hijacks your computer’s CPU power to mine. This means when you’re browsing the web, the malware is running in the background completely unbeknownst to you. There are a few types of this malware, and some run only when you visit a certain website and others can be maliciously installed on your computer. The best way to prevent this is by using antivirus software and adblockers.

If you’ve already been hit with this kind of malware, you’ll notice either your computer acting sluggish, getting warmer than usual, or its fan constantly spinning. If you aren’t running any kind of demanding software, like video games or video editing programs, this should be the first hint that your computer is working overtime.

If you’ve noticed your laptop acting up, it’s time to go check on what’s going on under the hood. Mac users can view a detailed breakdown of everything their computer is running by searching “Activity Monitor” and using the magnifying glass icon at the top-right of the screen. Windows users can simply hold down the Ctrl-Alt-Del keys to bring up “Task Manager.”

Both of these menus will display a graph of how much of your computer’s processing power is being used. Any massive spikes should be red flags. You’ll also see an ordered list of the programs using the most processing power at the moment. Before ending any of these programs be sure to research what they are, as you could be ending a crucial part of your operating system.

Both Tesla and the Los Angeles Times have had their sites infected by cryptojacking software. Companies with popular websites are the most at risk, as hackers can embed code onto their servers and use the CPU power of everyone who visits the site. But making it a habit to check on how your computer is running will ensure your device isn’t getting used to make someone else a crypto fortune.

advertisement:

The post How to #Know If Your #Slow #Computer Is #Secretly #Mining #Cryptocurrency appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked

Want to delete that embarrassing message you just sent? WhatsApp will let you, and so will Instagram — but if you’re using Facebook, then you’re out of luck.

Unless you’re Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO and cofounder of Facebook.

TechCrunch reported Thursday that some old messages sent by Zuckerberg and senior executives have disappeared from recipients’ Facebook Messenger inboxes, proven by the original email receipts sent at the time.

The company appeared to confirm the unique arrangement, telling TechCrunch the change was made in response to an uptick in hacking.

“After Sony Pictures’ emails were hacked in 2014 we made a number of changes to protect our executives’ communications. These included limiting the retention period for Mark’s messages in Messenger. We did so in full compliance with our legal obligations to preserve messages,” the company said.

The Sony hack targeted the emails of Sony film executives, which revealed a side of Hollywood rarely seen by outsiders, and the decision to name the event as a catalyst for Facebook’s message purge indicates how troubling the incident was in Silicon Valley — and that Facebook was concerned about being hacked.

The company also raised the idea of a “retention period,” though there is no such thing for normal users. If a user long presses a private message on Facebook a “Delete Message” pop up confirms that the function will “delete your copy of the message,” and the recipients’ copy will remain.

Facebook-owned Instagram has long had the option to “unsend” direct messages, while Facebook-owned WhatsApp recently launched a deletion function where unread messages can be deleted “for everyone.” A message is then displayed to all participants that content has been deleted.

But Zuckerberg’s deleted messages didn’t leave behind any such message, probably because they had already been read, many years ago.

The messages were originally sent to former employees and people outside of Facebook. According to TechCrunch, the recipients of the now-deleted messages were not informed at any stage that correspondence they received had been erased.

Zuckerberg may be the CEO of Facebook, but it’s unclear how the decision to remove senior executives’ messages would be allowed under the company’s terms of service. The terms only allow Facebook to remove content if the company believes “that it violates this Statement or our policies” or for infringing copyright.

Deleting messages quietly, and selectively, also appears to fly in the face of Facebook’s campaign to “make the world more open and transparent.” Its own policies say that the company “should publicly make available information about its purpose, plans, policies, and operations.”

Facebook appears to have not followed these policies in this instance, and it raises questions about the recipient’s right to privacy.

The news comes just weeks after the Cambridge Analytica scandal which has seen Zuckerberg admit that tens of millions of users probably had their data scraped.

advertisement:

The post Facebook #secretly deleted #some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private #messages over fears the #company could be #hacked appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

iPhone #Wi-Fi #bug lets #hackers #hijack your #phone and #secretly install #malicious #apps

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

iPhone #Wi-Fi #bug lets #hackers #hijack your #phone and #secretly install #malicious #apps

The cyber security community is still reeling after the revelation of the KRACK security vulnerability that breaks down Wi-Fi encryption. Now it seems another Wi-Fi-based bug has also been discovered.

Presented at the global Pwn2Own hacking contest in Tokyo, a team of researchers demonstrated how a separate Wi-Fi bug could be exploited to gain entry to iPhones and install malicious apps on them without the owners knowledge.

The details of the threat haven’t been made public yet as Apple hasn’t had time to patch the flaw. It’s discovery was enough to net the Tencent Keen Security Lab the top prize of $110,000.

The hacking contest is set up and run by the Zero Day Initiative, which seeks to find vulnerabilities in popular products and services and alert the manufacturers in time.

According to the official event page , the Tencent Keen Security Lab team used “code exectution through a WiFi bug” to escalate “privileges to persist through a reboot.” Effectively breaking through an iPhone’s lock screen through a Wi-Fi network.

The flaw will be relayed to Apple which could offer a software patch to close the gap.

“Once we verify the research presented is a true 0-day exploit, we immediately disclose the vulnerability to the vendor, who then has 90 days to release a fix,” explains the Zero Day Institute.

“Representatives from Apple, Google, and Huawei are all here and able to ask questions of the researchers if needed.

“At the end of the disclosure deadline, if a vendor is unresponsive or unable to provide a reasonable statement as to why the vulnerability is not fixed, the ZDI will publish a limited advisory including mitigation in an effort to enable the defensive community to protect users.”

As ever, from a security standpoint it is always advisable to make sure your phone is running the latest OS version and you closely vet the permissions you give to certain apps.

The post iPhone #Wi-Fi #bug lets #hackers #hijack your #phone and #secretly install #malicious #apps appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

South Bay teacher arrested for secretly recording people inside home bathroom

hands-and-breaking-handcuffs_shutterstock_58240561

SAN JOSE — A private elementary schoolteacher accused of secretly recording people in the bathroom of his home was charged Wednesday with three misdemeanors, according to the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office.

Authorities say the arrest Thursday of 31-year-old Andrew Donahue of Campbell was not related to his role as a teacher at Challenger School in San Jose. Donahue has been charged with three counts of taking photographs or filming someone who is in a bathroom or in a state of privacy, according to prosecutor Luis Ramos.

One of the alleged victims is a juvenile, according to authorities.

“He set up a camera in the bathroom and was keeping videotapes,” prosecutor Luis Ramos said.

Read More

The post South Bay teacher arrested for secretly recording people inside home bathroom appeared first on Parent Security Online.

View full post on Parent Security Online

15 Subtle Signs You’re Secretly Addicted to Love

Are you someone who’s always overly excited about anything that has to do with couples and romance? If so, you could actually be addicted to love! Red roses, hearts, and all things lovey-dovey; that’s what’s on your mind most of the time. Read More….

The post 15 Subtle Signs You’re Secretly Addicted to Love appeared first on Dating Scams 101.

View full post on Dating Scams 101

No, Nest Cam isn’t secretly spying on you

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

No, Nest Cam isn’t secretly spying on you

Is your Nest Cam watching you when you thought it was turned off? The WiFi streaming camera has found itself at the center of a security maelstrom this week, after research questioned just what was happening when the indicator light shuts off. Turns out, as with the Internet of Things in general, it’s complicated. Speculation about Nest Cam began following the release of an ABI Researchreport earlier this week, which took issue with the camera’s power consumption when not streaming. Measuring current draw when active and when turned “off” in the Nest app, the company concluded from the figures that “it appears Nest Cam is working around the clock.” “When a device goes to power down mode, you expect the current drain to drop quite a bit,” Jim Mielke, Vice President of Teardowns at ABI Research, said of the company’s findings. Source: http://www.slashgear.com/no-nest-cam-isnt-secretly-spying-on-you-25416086/

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post No, Nest Cam isn’t secretly spying on you appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Is your airport secretly spying on you? Yes, if you are in Dublin

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Is your airport secretly spying on you? Yes, if you are in Dublin

In an effort to measure how long it takes travelers to get through security, the Dublin, Ireland airport has been tracking mobile phone data. The airport has installed sensors into the ceiling above the security areas that allow the authority to track the time a mobile phone spends in the area. By logging the MAC addresses of any mobile phone with Wi-Fi or Bluetooth enabled, the airport management entity believes that it can better manage the security wait times at its airport. Its “Mobile Location Analytics” efforts aim to keep the wait time for security under 30 minutes. The news of the data tracking was originally reported by Irish newspaper the Independent, and subsequently ignited a bit of a firestorm on blogs and social media. Privacy advocates expressed concern that this tracking activity was not properly disclosed to travelers, and constituted a violation of travelers’ privacy. In a prepared statement, the DAA emphasized that the data is anonymized and not tied to an individual: “This is an anonymized service, with the MAC address being used only to identify a device for the purposes of checking queue times and dwell times. No personal information in relation to the identity of the device’s […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Is your airport secretly spying on you? Yes, if you are in Dublin appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security