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#sextrafficking | Ghislaine Maxwell seeks to keep Jeffrey Epstein court records under seal – NewsRadio 560 KPQ | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Attorneys for Ghislaine Maxwell, the former companion of deceased sex-offender Jeffrey Epstein, are asking a federal judge to keep a batch of court records under seal, arguing that public interest in the documents is outweighed by privacy considerations and the potential impact a release of the documents could have on an ongoing criminal investigation into alleged accomplices of Epstein.

“Ms. Maxwell … is aware that investigations surrounding the alleged conduct of Mr. Epstein survive his death. It is unclear who are witnesses or targets of any investigation,” Maxwell’s attorney, Jeffrey Pagliuca, wrote Wednesday in a filing objecting to unsealing certain documents. “The sealed testimony or summaries may inappropriately influence potential witnesses or alleged victims.”

The sealed court filings in the case — a now-settled civil defamation lawsuit filed against Maxwell in 2015 by Virginia Roberts Giuffre — are said to contain the names of hundreds of people, some famous and some not, who socialized, traveled or worked with Epstein over the span of more than a decade. The late financier has previously been linked to a coterie of high-profile business leaders, scientists, royalty and politicians.

Epstein, a convicted sex offender, was found dead in an apparent suicide in prison while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges that he denied.

Among the records now being considered for release is a 418-page transcript of one of Maxwell’s multi-hour depositions in the case, which Maxwell’s attorneys argue were given under an expectation of confidentiality that had been agreed to by both sides in the dispute, according to Maxwell’s court filing.

“This series of pleadings concerns [Giuffre’s] attempt to compel Ms. Maxwell to answer intrusive questions about her sex life,” Pagliuca wrote. “The subject matter of these [documents] is extremely personal, confidential, and subject to considerable abuse by the media.”

The collection of documents now being reviewed for potential release by Senior U.S. District Court Judge Loretta Preska represents just a small subset of the thousands of pages of documents that must be reviewed for potential release, a process that could drag on for many months.

Giuffre has accused Maxwell of facilitating and participating in Epstein’s abuse of minor girls. Maxwell has denied Giuffre’s allegations. When the defamation case was settled in 2017, a substantial portion of the court docket remained sealed or redacted. The sealed records include the identities of people who provided information in the case under an expectation of confidentiality, plus the names of alleged victims and individuals accused of enabling Epstein or participating in the abuse.

Maxwell attorneys argue that the bulk of the sealed documents and exhibits should stay sealed, contending that they “were gratuitous and served no legitimate purpose” when they were submitted by Giuffre’s attorneys and because many of the documents contain the names of dozens of non-parties who have yet to receive notice that the records could be made public.

An attorney for Giuffre did not respond to a request for comment on Maxwell’s court filing.

Giuffre, now a 36-year-old mother living in Australia, alleges she was sexually abused as a teenager by Epstein and Maxwell between 2000 and 2002. She also claims to have been directed to have sex with some of their prominent friends, including Britain’s Prince Andrew. She filed the action against Maxwell in September 2015, alleging that the former British socialite defamed her when her publicist issued a statement referring to Giuffre’s allegations as “obvious lies.”

For the next year and a half, attorneys for the two women engaged in an acrimonious duel of pre-trial arguments, much of which took shape in heavily redacted or sealed court filings. The case settled just before a trial was set to begin in May 2017. A year later, the Miami Herald newspaper filed an ultimately successful motion to unseal at least some portions of the undisclosed record of the case.

Lawyers representing Giuffre, Maxwell, the Herald, and an anonymous individual who intervened to assert privacy interests, have been haggling for the last several months over their favored approaches to unsealing the records. The arguments over the protocols alone amounted to more than 50 additional entries on the court docket before Judge Preska arrived at the final procedure.

Earlier this month, notification letters were sent to two “John Does,” anonymous individuals whose names are among several dozen that appear in just the first batch of sealed and redacted documents currently under review by Preska, according to court records. Neither of those individuals responded to the letters, according to Maxwell’s court filing.

Giuffre has advocated for near-total disclosure of the records, while Maxwell and attorneys for the intervening individual have urged Preska to carefully balance the intense public interest in the case against potentially “life-changing” reputational damage that could befall those whose names are made public. Because the parties reached a confidential settlement, the allegations leveled in the dispute are unproven, having never been tested by an independent trier of fact.

Previously unsealed records from the case have already generated headlines around the world after a federal appeals court released more than 2,000 pages of documents last August, a month after Epstein’s arrest by federal authorities in New York.

Included in that collection were excerpts from Giuffre’s depositions naming several prominent men she alleges Epstein and Maxwell directed her to have sex with, including Prince Andrew, attorney Alan Dershowitz, former U.S. Senator George Mitchell and former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson. All of those men, and others accused by Giuffre, have denied the allegations.

“The documents and exhibits should be carefully examined for the vivid, detailed and tragic story they tell in the face of cursory, bumper sticker-like statements by those accused,” Giuffre’s attorney, Sigrid McCawley, wrote in a statement on the day of the documents’ release. “Virginia Roberts Giuffre is a survivor and a woman to be believed. She believes a reckoning of inevitable accountability has begun.”

The morning after that first set of documents was made public, Epstein was found unresponsive in his jail cell in Manhattan, where he was being held pending trial on charges of child sex-trafficking and conspiracy.

Maxwell, 58, is the daughter of the late British publishing magnate Robert Maxwell, who died in 1991 in what was ruled an accidental drowning off the coast of the Canary Islands. She met Epstein in New York following her father’s death, and the two were closely linked for more than a decade. Sources tell ABC News that Maxwell remains under criminal investigation by federal authorities in New York, who have vowed to hold responsible any alleged co-conspirators in Epstein’s sex trafficking conspiracy.

In previously unsealed excerpts from her depositions in the case, Maxwell derided Giuffre as an “absolute liar.” She has also denied allegations from Giuffre and other women who contend in court filings that Maxwell recruited and trained girls and young women for Epstein and facilitated their abuse.

“She absolutely denies that she participated in this or any other sexual abuse or trafficking or assault, and no court, judge or jury has ever determined that she has,” an attorney for Maxwell wrote last month in a related case.

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The post #sextrafficking | Ghislaine Maxwell seeks to keep Jeffrey Epstein court records under seal – NewsRadio 560 KPQ | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#cybersecurity | hacker | Equifax CISO touts company’s transparency it as seeks breach redemption

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Fresh off a financial settlement over its 2017 data breach that affected roughly half the U.S. population, Equifax is forging ahead with a $1 billion-plus investment in a new security plan — and CISO Jamil Farshchi was eager to tout the credit reporting agency’s progress so far in a session this week at the RSA Conference in San Francisco.

Farshchi, who was hired as CISO in February 2018 after previously helping Home Depot clean up its security practices following its own breach, said that moving forward, the company is focusing on three key pillars: assurance in its data and controls, automation and generating security awareness among senior leadership, as well as lower-level employees, who will be scored on their security practices.

Farshchi asserted that Equifax has already succeeded in improving its corporate culture, controls and compliance, while also partnering with customers and industry organizations to share lessons learned. Indeed, he was particular effusive about the company’s openness about its recovery efforts so far.

“[I]t is extraordinarily rare for an organization to be transparent about what they’re doing and the initiatives that are underway to be able to transform after that breach,” said Farshchi. “Most organizations, you put your head down, you grind it out and that’s that. The problem what that approach, in my opinion, is that it doesn’t afford the opportunity for everyone else to learn from the things that you’ve gleaned trough that crisis event.”

Since the breach, the company has hired more than 1,000 employees in IT and cybersecurity, despite a shortage of talent in this field. The company also had to regain its compliance certifications after losing them as a result of the incident.

“[I]t is infinitely more difficult to be able to regain a certification once you’ve lost it than it is to get it in the first place and certainly to renew it on an annual basis. So we went through a huge effort to do that,” noted Farshchi, who had undergone the experience perviously with Home Depot.

Farshchi spent a bulk of his presentation further detailing plans and objectives for improving assurance, automation and awareness.

The assurance component involves maintaining focus on basic fundamentals and regularly testing data controls and the entire security stack to make sure the company is not making false assumptions about its security profile. In essence, Farshchi wants multiple data points that offer a multi-layered view of the network environment, rather than relying on a single source of truth that might be unreliable.

Farshchi cited the company’s migration to the cloud using the Google Cloud Platform, noting the company has instituted assurance on top of its controls there. “So as of today, we can measure around 120 of our controls in that space — and the beauty of it is, unlike an on-prem environment, everything is standardized, so I can know real time, all the time, the effectiveness of every single one of those controls across the entire estate, which is really, really powerful…”

Meanwhile, Equifax’s effort to increase automation — in areas such as risk-scoring and remediation of network weaknesses, for example — is intended to streamline activities and get controls in place faster by relieving IT employees of burdensome, time-consuming manual processes. Farshchi asserted that the company is not trying to displace employees or downsize, but rather optimally leverage its employees.

Finally, to improve awareness, Farshchi’s team is instituting measures to better communicate with Equifax’s board of directors and the general workforce.

For the former, the team has developed framework designed to plainly communicate current security goals and posture to senior leadership. The framework includes a control map that details what controls the company has already implemented, as well as the predominant threat vectors Equifax must watch out for. This allows the directors to see where the company is best protected, where risk still exists and how the security team intents to reduce that risk. Equifax plans to open source this framework for other organizations to use.

To address the general workforce, the company is instituting a system to score employees on their security practices much like they rate consumers’ credit scores. For example, if employees click through on a simulating phishing email, that will adversely affect the scorecards they receive on a monthly basis, and hopefully influence more responsible behavior in the future.

“We’re doing this because our DNA in Equifax is obviously credit scoring and so we know how to do analytics… on this and we’re just applying that same skill set to this problem,” said Farshchi.

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#deepweb | Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu seeks immunity from prosecution

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans   Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu seeks immunity from prosecution By Jean Shaoul 4 January 2020 Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has announced that he will officially request that the Knesset (parliament) grant him immunity from prosecution in the three corruption cases he faces, a move aimed at […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

US seeks to mandate anti-hacking defences for self-driving cars

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Autonomous vehicles sold in the United States will need to be equipped with defence mechanisms against cyber security attacks should a new bill passed by the House of Representatives make it into law. Section 5 of the Safely Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research In Vehicle Evolution – SELF DRIVE…

The post US seeks to mandate anti-hacking defences for self-driving cars appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Immigration phone scam seeks to steal victims’ identities

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Immigration phone scam seeks to steal victims’ identities

Scam artists claiming to work for “U.S. Immigration” are calling victims across the country seeking to steal their personal information and commit identity theft, the Department of Homeland Security’s inspector …

The post Immigration phone scam seeks to steal victims’ identities appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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MasterCard Seeks To Stop Online Fraud With Selfies, Fingerprints

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

MasterCard Seeks To Stop Online Fraud With Selfies, Fingerprints

MasterCard plans to launch new biometric technology for verifying customer identities during online shopping transactions in the coming weeks with merchants and banks. The company has been testing facial and fingerprint recognition software, called Identity Check, in the Netherlands, Canada

The post MasterCard Seeks To Stop Online Fraud With Selfies, Fingerprints appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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U.S. Supreme Court Seeks Views on Level of ‘Benefit’ Required in Special Education

The justices ask the Obama administration whether it should take up a case about the level of benefit required under federal special education law.

View full post on The School Law Blog – Education Week







#pso #htcs #b4inc

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The post U.S. Supreme Court Seeks Views on Level of ‘Benefit’ Required in Special Education appeared first on Parent Security Online.

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Is state’s child-abuse reporting system working? Audit seeks to find out

The world of child protection in Pennsylvania has turned upside over the past year or so with two dozen new laws put in place to bolster child safety along with new systems installed for reporting child abuse and neglect.

Given all those changes spurred at least in part by the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal, state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale wants to take a look at how well the ones affecting ChildLine are working.

DePasquale announced on Wednesday his auditors last month began the first-ever state audit of this program overseen by Department of Human Services that runs the state’s child abuse hotline and processes applications for child abuse clearances.

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Federal Bureau of Investigation seeks hacker after 1.2 billion logins are stolen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Federal Bureau of Investigation seeks hacker after 1.2 billion logins are stolen

That hacker, known as “mr.grey”, was identified based on data from a cybsecurity firm that announced in August 2014 that it had determined an alleged Russian crime ring was responsible for stealing information from more than 420,000 websites,THE DOCUMENTS said. Court documents made public last week, and seen by Reuters, name a mysterious force called “mr.grey” as the hacker, or group of hackers, behind last year’s attack, which is regarded as the biggest cyber heist to date. The FBI is now on the heels of a “mr.grey”, a Russian hacker who announced on hackers forums that he is selling users’ data hacked from thousands of websites, including Facebook and Twitter; the U.S.SECURITY AGENCY has linked the foreign hacker through a Russian email id to the breach of about 1.2 billion users’ data across the internet. Hold Security’s chief information security officer, Alex Holden, told Reuters that he believes the 2011 message proves the hacker, or group of hackers, has access to a large database of stolen data. Source: http://www.ledgergazette.com/federal-bureau-of-investigation-seeks-hacker-after-1-2-billion-logins-are-stolen/155356/

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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For Cybersecurity, US Government Seeks a Few Good Hackers

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

WASHINGTON:  Alejandro Mayorkas, a high-ranking Department of Homeland Security official, opened a speech over the summer in Las Vegas before hundreds of hackers with a dare. “I challenge you all to make my phone ring during my remarks,” he said, brandishing a flip phone the size of a soda bottle. “Take a shot,” he said, urging the crowd to hack his phone. Then he sweetened the deal: There would be a government job for anyone who succeeded. The conference’s volunteer organizers, known as goons, soon interrupted Mayorkas for a long-standing tradition at the cybersecurity convention DEF CON: First-time speakers take a shot of whiskey on stage. “That was my first of the day, by the way,” Mayorkas said after downing the Jack Daniels, “but it won’t be my last.” Mayorkas was just one of a fleet of federal officials who attended Black Hat and DEF CON this year. The two gatherings have grown into annual pilgrimages for security researchers, hackers and hangers-on. Their mission? Enlist hackers to protect the homeland. Black Hat attracts cybersecurity companies that are eager to mingle with government officials and secure government work. The DEF CON crowd skews toward the Hollywood hacker stereotypes of geeks in […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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