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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Who Should the CISO Report To in 2020?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans The debate over who the CISO should report to is a hot topic among security professionals, and that shows no sign of changing soon. That’s because there is still no standard or clear-cut answer. Ask CISOs themselves for their opinion, and you will get a variety […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

5 Reasons Why Programmers Should Think like Hackers

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Programming has five main steps: the identification and definition of the problem, the planning of the solution for the problem, coding of the program, testing, and documentation. It’s a meticulous process that cannot be completed without going through all the essential points. In all of these, […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | 3 Steps Developers Should Take To Use npm Securely

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Node Package Manager (npm) was a revolutionary addition to web application programming. It allowed developers to create small, reusable pieces of code and share them with the developer community. npm gives developers massive flexibility and makes developing applications incredibly simple, but there are also potential pitfalls […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Splunk customers should update now to dodge Y2K-style bug – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

If you’re a Splunk admin, the company has issued a critical warning regarding a showstopping Y2K-style date bug in one of the platform’s configuration files that needs urgent attention.

According to this week’s advisory, from 1 January 2020 (00:00 UTC) unpatched instances of Splunk will be unable to extract and recognise timestamps submitted to it in a two-digit date format.

In effect, it will understand the ‘year’ up to 31 December 2019, but as soon as this rolls over to 1 January 2020, it will mark it as invalid, either defaulting back to a 2019 date or adding its own incorrect “misinterpreted date”.

In addition, beginning on 13 September 2020 at 12:26:39 PM UTC, unpatched Splunk instances will no longer be able to recognise timestamps for events with dates based on Unix time (which began at 00:00 UTC on 1 January 1970).

Left unpatched, the effect on customers could be far-reaching.

What platforms like Splunk do is one of the internet’s best-kept secrets – turning screeds of machine-generated log data (from applications, websites, sensors, Internet of Things devices, etc) into something humans can make sense of.

There was probably a time when sysadmins could do this job but there are now so many devices spewing so much data that automated systems have become a must.

This big data must also be stored somewhere, hence the arrival of cloud platforms designed to do the whole job, including generating alerts when something’s going awry or simply to analyse how well everything’s humming along.