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#comptia | Ring’s leaked Video Doorbell 3 has a few small upgrades

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A sneak peek of the product page for the upcoming Ring Video Doorbell 3 shows some upgrades over the Video Doorbell 2. Dave Zatz at Zatz Not Funny discovered the product page (it’s since been removed, apparently), which included a “pre-roll” feature for the doorbell’s Plus model that captures four seconds of black-and-white video before a motion alert goes off.

The product page described it as a “first-to-market feature for battery-powered doorbells and unique exclusively to Ring,” although Zatz points out that other video doorbells have this so-called “foresight” feature, just not battery-powered models.

A screenshot of the Ring Video Doorbell 3 product page.
Zatz Not Funny via Ring

The basic design of the Video Doorbell 3 doesn’t appear much different from its predecessor, but Zatz reports the new model’s faceplate will be easier to remove; it will have a “near” motion sensor to reduce false motion alerts; and it will have 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi (only 2.4GHz is available on the Video Doorbell 2).

It’s not clear when the Video Doorbell 3 will be available, and Zatz notes the product page didn’t mention support for Ring’s Sidewalk networking standard or Apple HomeKit support (that’s not to say they won’t be included, just that neither was mentioned).

Zatz calls the Ring Video Doorbell 3 a “decent, minor upgrade from Ring 2, with a clever upsell for those seeking a bit more security,” adding they’re likely to be priced between $199 and $229.

Amazon-owned Ring has come under fire for privacy and security concerns in recent months. In January, the company added a new privacy dashboard for its app, to allow users to manage their connected devices better, including control over whether local police departments can request video footage from an owner’s Ring camera.

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#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Why small businesses in India should take cybersecurity seriously

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

NEW DELHI: City-based Virendra Shekhawat, founder of Delhi Photography Club, which teaches photography to beginners through workshops was the target of a cyber-attack in December 2017. The company’s Facebook page which had 2 lakh followers and 10,000 paid subscribers was hacked and Shekhawat was logged out of his own account.

Despite filing a police compliant and paying a ransom, Shekhawat failed to secure access to his account. He finally accessed it after Facebook reset his account. Shekhawat made just 12,000 from the page that month compared with monthly earnings of 3,00,000 and 4,00,000 prior to the attack.

Cyber-attacks on small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) have been on the rise. According to a 2019 study by Accenture, 43% of cyberattacks worldwide are aimed at SMBs. India has 6 crore SMBs that account for 30% of the GDP as per the Confederation of Indian Industry and with the adoption of technology their contribution is only likely to grow.

Consulting firm Zinnov expects SMBs in India to consume digital services worth $80 billion in the next 5 years.

Unlike large enterprises, many SMBs often do not have resources and manpower to deal with the evolving threat landscape. On top of it, they feel that they are not at risk.

A July 2019 study by UK based cyber-security firm Keeper Security found that decision makers in 62% of companies between $1 million and $500 million did not think they would be the target of cyber-attacks. It is this perception which may discourage them to spend enough on cyber-security.

“Small budgets certainly have a role to play for small companies that might forego hardware security via firewalls and unified threat management devices, and certainly would find it difficult to hire IT staff with the skill and experience to implement security measures,” said Samir Mody, vice president, CyberThreat Lab, K7 Computing, an Indian cyber-security firm.

To cut down on spending, many are tempted to use cracked or pirated software. Mody warned that using pirated or outdated operating systems also leads to the risk of cyber-attacks since they may not get security updates.

According to an August 2019 report by Russian cyber-security firm Kaspersky, despite the availability of newer versions of software, around 41% of consumers still use either an unsupported or approaching end of support desktop operating system such as Windows XP or Windows 7.

About 40% of very small businesses and 48% of SMBs continue to rely on these operating systems. Microsoft recently killed all support including security updates and patches for Windows 7.

SMBs in banking, financial services and insurance sector are more vulnerable as they allow cyber-criminals to make monetary gain and steal sensitive data at the same time.

Similar to SMBs, startups also feature high the list of potential targets of cyber-criminals. Despite founders of startups having a better understanding of modern day cyber-security risks, and a higher likelihood of them taking steps to protect their assets, there have been frequent cyber-attacks on startups. Among Indian startups, Zomato suffered a security breach in 2017.

Also, targeting startups can sometimes be more lucrative than SMBs. “Most important thing that a startup needs to protect is its IP (intellectual property). Many of these startups have no funding for first 6 to 12 months but they have a great idea. If the idea or source code is leaked, they can lose what makes them unique,” said Mukul Shrivastava, partner, Forensic and Integrity Services, EY India.

Credibility is also important. If a customer data base is breached, startups lose credibility, which can stall future investment in addition to heavy penalties they may have to pay, added Shrivastava. A 2019 study by US-based National Cyber Security Alliance suggests that 60% of SMBs that face a cyberattack tend to go out of business within six months.

Cyber-attacks have a catastrophic effect on startups as they are characteristically anchored in technology and operate on a lean infrastructure. If this infrastructure gets compromised, it usually compromises their business entirely, warned Rakesh Kharwal, managing director, India/South Asia & ASEAN, Cyberbit – an Israeli cyber-secuirty firm.

“Any cyber-attack primarily complicates a business in three ways, i.e. operations, market perception, and legal. Now, startups also have meagre capital. A report by Data Security Council of India (DSCI) also states that the average cost of cyber-attacks has increased by 8% in India. So, for startups, it becomes tough to sustain unit economics,” added Kharwal.

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#deepweb | Google’s New Messaging App To Unify Gmail, Drive, And Hangouts…And Other Small Business Tech News

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans KRAKOW, POLAND – 2019/01/23: In this photo illustration, the Google Hangouts logo is seen displayed … [+] on an Android mobile phone. (Photo Illustration by Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images) LightRocket via Getty Images Here are five things in technology that happened this past week […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Cyber Threats Worry Small Business Executives

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cyber threats are concerns for many small and medium-sized business executives entering 2020, AppRiver’s “Q4 Cyberthreat Index for Business Survey” revealed.

Cyber threats represent top concerns for many small and medium-sized business (SMB) executives entering 2020, according to the “Q4 Cyberthreat Index for Business Survey” from cybersecurity solutions provider AppRiver.

Key findings from AppRiver’s survey included:

  • 79 percent of SMB executives and IT decision-makers named potential cyber threats as “a top-of-mind concern.”
  • 72 percent noted a successful cyberattack likely would be harmful to their business.
  • 66 percent said they believe cyberattacks “are prevalent on a business such as their own.”
  • 45 percent said they believe their business is vulnerable to imminent cyberattacks.

Furthermore, AppRiver’s survey indicated that 62 percent of SMBs plan to increase their cybersecurity budgets in 2020. The survey also showed that most SMBs have cybersecurity strategies and areas in which they plan to invest next year.

Technology Improvement, Training Are Top Cybersecurity Priorities for SMBs in 2020

Technology improvement (58 percent) ranked first among the top areas in which SMBs plan to invest for cybersecurity improvement in 2020, AppRiver’s survey revealed. Meanwhile, training (57 percent) ranked second, followed by conducting regular reviews of security defenses (50 percent), adding in-house security talent (35 percent) and outsourcing security tasks or partnering with an MSP (30 percent).

Ultimately, SMBs — regardless of industry — are susceptible to cyberattacks. But with support from MSSPs, these businesses could bolster their security posture and combat cyberattacks both now and in the future.

Approximately 32 percent of SMB IT security operations are supported by MSSPs, according to the “2019 Global State of Cybersecurity in Small and Medium-Sized Businesses” study of roughly 2,200 SMBs conducted by password management software provider Keeper. This study also showed that 70 percent of SMBs leverage MSSPs for firewall monitoring or management or intrusion prevention systems.


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#cybersecurity | hacker | Data breach causes 10 percent of small businesses to shutter

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Data breaches hitting massive entities like Equifax, Facebook and Target grab headlines, but the impact on small businesses is just as severe with attacks causing bankruptcy or even forcing a firm to shutter its doors. A report issued by the National Cyber Security Alliance, based on […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Australian small businesses targets of half of all cybercrime

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Three common small business scams 

1. Fake billing or invoice scams 

The scam: According to the ACCC’s Scamwatch, there have been 8,269 cases of false billing scams resulting in over $7 million in loses in 2019 alone. These scams occur when scammers send out fake invoices to businesses asking for payment for anything from supplies to website domain renewal. They can even be sent from a legitimate supplier or business you commonly deal with if their email address has been compromised. 

How to protect your business: Both Scamwatch and NAB state that the best way for businesses to safeguard themselves against fake billing or invoice scams is through vigilance. Querying invoices or payment requests from unfamiliar sources is a must, as is contacting existing suppliers if they send through an invoice at an unusual time or with a different bank account in order to confirm whether or not it’s legitimate.       

2. Tax scams 

The scam: Many Aussies have likely received a dodgy call from someone pretending to be from the Australian Tax Office and figures show just how common these can be, with the ATO reporting that it had received over 40,000 reports of impersonation scams just in the period from January to April 2019! 

According to NAB, there are two common small business tax scams. The first is scammers claiming to need personal and bank details in order to send a business a tax refund. The second is scammers claiming that a tax debt is owed which needs to be paid immediately (with a credit card, money transfer or even a git card) in order to avoid arrest. 

How to protect your business: While the ATO has stated that it may contact businesses via a phone call, email or SMS, it has also released the following advice to help taxpayers remain cautious: 

– The ATO will not send an email or SMS asking taxpayers to click on a link directing them to any login page

– The ATO will not threaten taxpayers with immediate arrest, jail or deportation

– The ATO will not request payment via iTunes or Google Play cards, prepaid cards, cryptocurrency or to a personal bank account

– The ATO will not request a fee in order to release a refund

3. Payment Scams 

The scam: There a number of different common payment scams, including overpayment scams. 

One example NAB gives is a ‘terminal takeover’ scam in which a scammer asks to take hold of a payment terminal when paying for goods or services. The scammer then cancels the original payment request (often while distracting the cashier) and enters a new payment amount far higher than the original which is then paid for with a stolen credit card. The scammer will then demand that a refund of the difference be made in cash or onto a different card. 

How to protect your business: NAB recommends that in-person payments using a terminal are always conducted behind a counter so that potential scammers can’t edit a transaction themselves and that if a refund does need to be made, it should be done using the original card the customer provided. 

Looking for more small business resources? 

Check out the Mozo business banking hub for the latest small business news and a range of helpful guides, as well as comparison tables featuring some of the hottest business loans, business credit cards and business bank accounts around.

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CyberPolicy #Expands #Cybersecurity #Offerings for #Small #Businesses

CyberPolicy, a wholly-owned subsidiary of CoverHound Inc. that offers an online cyber insurance and security product for small businesses, has unveiled a new set of complimentary offerings to help small businesses protect against cyber threats.

The new “Plan. Prevent. Insure.” offerings provide guided options from advisors, educational security resources, and a CyberCheckup to assess a company’s cyber risk level.

CyberPolicy is targeted towards small businesses with knowledge and tools to better secure their data, operations, and reputation.

CyberPolicy’s free expanded offerings for small businesses include:

A CyberCheckup, which assesses cybersecurity needs
Expert guidance on best practices, including a personalized cyber plan
External web scans from cyber risk monitoring partners
Small business-centric educational resources
Tools that manage and provide guidance on how to bridge security gaps
Exclusive deals and promotions on cybersecurity products
Access to cyber insurance experts to help minimize business exposure
Online insurance quotes and online insurance purchasing that can be done within minutes
CyberPolicy launched its comparative site for cyber insurance in 2016, allowing small businesses to quote, compare and buy cyber insurance online in minutes. Since then, CyberPolicy has expanded its cyber insurance offerings to cover 98 percent of small businesses types with up to $250 million revenue.

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Four #Proactive #Tips to Improve #Cybersecurity for Small #Businesses

Source: National Cyber Security News

Although the media headlines often highlight major data breaches of large corporations and government agencies, the majority of businesses being hacked are small businesses. Why is this the case? Most small businesses do not have layers of security in place to protect them so attackers consider them low-hanging fruit. According to Verizon’s 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report, 61 percent of data breaches in 2016 affected small businesses. As many of you are aware, the title industry is in the attackers’ direct line of fire. The good news is that effective IT security is not beyond reach. Here are a few cybersecurity tips that can benefit your business.

Network Security

Implementing a network firewall with intrusion detection and prevention capabilities (IDS/IPS) is crucial. A firewall protects your network from malicious traffic and an IDS/IPS system properly monitored can stop a attackers in their tracks. Unmanaged systems do not provide adequate security.

Attackers are working around the clock and so should your security. Performing regular network vulnerability testing, internally and externally, can identify risks and give you the opportunity to remediate before being hacked. Many of the common vulnerabilities that this process could identify include legacy or otherwise unsupported operating systems, poor patch management and exposed systems.

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Ignorance Of #Cyber Threat Creates #Conundrum For Small #Business #Data #Security

Ignorance Of #Cyber Threat Creates #Conundrum For Small #Business #Data #Security

McAfee Labs recently published its 2018 Threats Predictions report, and after a year of high-profile cyberattacks and data breaches, analysts say the threat won’t let up in the new year. A rising challenge for the enterprise is the fact that cyberattackers are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their methods. According to McAfee, while companies are embracing innovations like machine learning to safeguard their systems, attackers, too, are using these same tools.

“Machine learning can process massive quantities of data and perform operations at great scale to detect and correct known vulnerabilities, suspicious behavior and zero-day attacks,” McAfee said in its report. “But adversaries will certainly employ machine learning themselves to support their attacks, learning from defensive responses, seeking to disrupt detection models and exploiting newly discovered vulnerabilities faster than defenders can patch them.”

If there’s one thing the enterprise has learned this year, it’s that a data breach can happen to any business — including small businesses (SMBs). Or, according to the latest data, many small businesses haven’t learned this lesson.

In this week’s B2B Data Digest, PYMNTS dives into new research about small businesses’ data security and cybersecurity efforts. Small businesses seem quite confident in their ability to protect themselves and their customers’ data, but according to researchers, that confidence is likely misguided.

—60 percent of SMBs said they don’t follow PCI DSS or HIPPA rules when storing customer credit card and banking information, according to new research from Clutch. The firm surveyed 300 small businesses about how they store data in the cloud and found that the majority aren’t following the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) as required by law. Clutch warned that fines for non-compliance with these rules can reach into the millions of dollars.

—54 percent of SMBs that store medical data in the cloud admit they don’t follow storage industry regulations, meaning these businesses could be putting sensitive company and consumer data at risk, Clutch also found.

—90 percent of SMBs are at least “somewhat” confident in their cloud storage’s security, a 3 percent increase from 2016 figures. That statistic is troubling, considering so many small businesses are actually lagging in cloud data security, according to the survey.

—60 percent of small firms say they use encryption to safeguard data in the cloud, the most common security measure cited by SMBs in Clutch’s survey. More than half (58 percent) said they train employees in data security, and 53 percent said they use two-factor authentication, though Clutch warned that businesses should be using more cybersecurity strategies than these three methods alone.

—74 percent of SMBs don’t have cyber liability insurance, according to separate research from Insureon. The small business insurance company surveyed 2,500 members of the small business community Manta, and the results suggest that the SMBs that aren’t following data storage regulations may not only be at risk for fines, but could face added-on consequences if they go uninsured.

—25 percent of small firms have consumer data that is susceptible to an attack on their business network, Insureon found, while nearly a sixth said they have already experienced a data breach.

—82 percent of small businesses told Insureon they don’t feel they’re at risk for a cyberattack or data breach, echoing similar sentiments found by Clutch: SMBs could be ignorant to their cybersecurity threats, despite many having already experienced an attack. Insureon President Jeff Somers said in a statement that the research is “surprising, considering the amount of media circulating about mass data breaches and cybersecurity. Many small business owners have their whole life savings tied up in their businesses, and they don’t understand how vulnerable they are to a cyberattack.”

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State of Small Business Cybersecurity in North America

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

State of Small Business Cybersecurity in North America

Small business owners know they are at risk for cyberattacks, but they are somewhat at a loss as to what to do. That’s one of the findings of a new report from the Better Business Bureau, The State of Small Business Cybersecurity in North America, released today as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. One of the more troubling findings is that half of small businesses reported they could remain profitable for only one month if they lost essential data.

“Profitability is the ultimate test of risk,” said Bill Fanelli, CISSP, chief security officer for the Council of Better Business Bureaus and one of the authors of the report. “It’s alarming to think that half of small businesses could be at that much risk just a short time after a cybersecurity incident.”

“Small business owners get it,” Fanelli continued. “When we asked them about the most common cybersecurity threats – ransomware, phishing, malware – they know what’s out there, and most of them have basic protections in place. For instance, 81% use antivirus software and 76% have firewalls. But one of the most cost-effective prevention tools, employee education, is used by fewer than half of the companies we surveyed. Other prevention measures scored even lower.”

BBB surveyed approximately 1,100 businesses in North America (71.4% of the sample came from the United States, 28.5% from Canada and 0.1% from Mexico). Two-thirds of the participants were BBB Accredited Businesses, and they apparently fared marginally better in most measures, such as awareness of specific threats and adoption of cybersecurity measures. The data was collected in an online survey with a margin of error of approximately +/- 3% for a 95% confidence interval.

The report focuses on cybersecurity effectiveness from three perspectives: a) cybersecurity standards/frameworks; b) best practices; and c) cost-benefit analysis. One of the key findings is that the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, technically a voluntary standard from the National Institute for Standards and Technology, is becoming mandatory in some markets. Not only are many companies requiring it of their vendors for procurement, but many businesses are adopting it because it helps them run a better business. The NIST framework is the basis for BBB’s training program, “5 Steps to Better Business Cybersecurity”

The State of Small Business Cybersecurity emphasizes the need not only for education and training, but for cost-benefit analysis of cybersecurity measures. The report suggests a formula created by two professors at the University of Maryland, Martin P. Loeb, PhD and Lawrence A. Gordon, PhD, to help small business owners estimate their risk from cybersecurity attacks and calculate an appropriate investment in prevention.

“It doesn’t do any good for a small business to adopt a $10,000 solution if the potential risk reduction is only worth $5,000,” said Fanelli. “We hope this report will give small business owners greater awareness of the real and the perceived risks of cyberattacks, as well as best practices for protecting against these types of security threats. We hope it serves as a step forward in advancing cybersecurity in the marketplace.”

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