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International Conference on Social Media, Wearable and Web Analytics

General Cybersecurity Conference

 June 11 – 12, 2018 | Glasgow, United Kingdom

Cybersecurity Conference Description

IEEE is the Technical Co-Sponsor (TCS) of the International Conference on Social Media, Wearable and Web Analytics (Social Media 2018), an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of social media, security of social media and consequential impacts and risks due to compromise or security breaches. It covers economic importance of social media, the emergence of wearable, wearable for fitness, e-health and life style improvements, and the use of web analytics for social media enhancements, business intelligence and business empowerment.

With the wave of phishing attacks against celebrities, high profile government officials, and nationals on social media, this conference is timely. Most importantly, we seek recommendations, solutions and advice on ways, methods and techniques for protecting our digital society.

The aim of the Social Media 2018 is to encourage participation and promotion of collaborative scientific, industrial and academic inter-workings among individual researchers, practitioners, members of existing associations, academia, standardisation bodies, and including government departments and agencies. The purpose is to build bridges between academia and industry, and to encourage interplay of different cultures.

Social Media 2018 invites researchers and industry practitioners to submit papers that encompass principles, analysis, design, methods and applications. All submitted papers are independently peer-reviewed.

The conference proceedings will be submitted for consideration for publishing and listing on the following bibliographic indexes: IEEE Computer Society Digital Library, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, DBLP Computer Science, Scopus, CiteSeerX, Computer Science Index, EI Compendex, Academic Search Complete, CiteULike, Google Scholar & Microsoft Academic Search.

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The #shocking #trend of people #breaking into each others’ #social media #accounts

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The #shocking #trend of people #breaking into each others’ #social media #accounts

Spouses hack each others’ Facebook messages, parents track their offspring’s cellphone movements and lovers crack lovers’ private messages.

To most of us, EFF leader Julius Malema’s recent claim that his e-mail account was attacked by government backed hackers left a bit of a Spy vs Spy taste in the mouth.

Particularly after SA Communist Party bigwig Solly Mapaila made the same claim two days later.

But I don’t think it is so farfetched that politicians’ confidential correspondence can be targeted by cyber attackers. Just ask Hillary Clinton.

The shocking trend, however, is that ordinary citizens are breaking into each others’ social media accounts left, right and centre.

It is those closest to people who break into their personal accounts and spy on their correspondence.

Spouses hack each others’ Facebook messages, parents track their offspring’s cellphone movements and lovers crack lovers’ private messages behind their naked backs.

The worst of all is that you don’t have to be a Russian hacker or cyber geek to breach somebody’s social media. People don’t need coding skills.

If you have the skills to use Twitter, you can hack Twitter. What about WhatsApp’s encoded message technology? Even a rookie hacker can choose from a variety of techniques to break into the messaging service account.

The most popular seems to be software which allows a hacker in after just a few minutes with the target’s phone, such as Copy9 and a host of others.

Or he doesn’t even have to touch your phone – sniffer software allows him to hack your WhatsApp account from a distance if you’re on the same WiFi network. And Facebook? The classical techniques are rather unrefined, because it locks the user out of his or her account, which means the hacking attempt will be noticed.

More stealthily, though, are software or hardware keyloggers, which records every keystroke the user makes on a computer including passwords.

Or the hacker can use software such as FaceGeek or Spyzie or Hyper Cracker. And Twitter? Software such as Twitterhacker is abundant.

Of course it is completely illegal to hack someone’s social media account under the Electronic Communications Act. You can even go to jail for it.

Perhaps our modern world needs more than laws.

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Time for a less #hacker-friendly #Social Security system

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Time for a less #hacker-friendly #Social Security system

Last month’s announcement by Equifax that its consumer-credit database suffered a catastrophic hacking attack meant nearly half of all Americans had their Social Security numbers and vital financial information exposed to theft. The threat of massive-scale identity theft is very real.

Equifax is only the latest of multiple, large-scale data-hacking incidents. It’s time for the federal government to come up with a more secure identification code to protect citizens. That’s not just our assessment; the White House cybersecurity coordinator, Rob Joyce, also has concluded that the Social Security numbering system has “outlived its usefulness.”

Think about your own Social Security number and the hundreds of times you’ve shared it with companies, schools, doctors, government agencies or other institutions that insisted they had a legitimate need for it. Always with the promise to keep it confidential, of course. Older Americans can recall when their Social Security numbers were used on their driver’s license or university IDs. There were those nine digits, for all to see.

Really industrious hackers can find Social Security numbers by accessing old court documents. No one is safe, and it really comes down to whose number hits on the hacking roulette wheel of chance. There has to be a better, more secure way.

“It’s a flawed system,” Joyce told The Washington Post this month. “If you think about it, every time we use the Social Security number you put it at risk. By interacting with it, you’ve given a key piece of information out publicly.”

Joyce wants the government to consider more modern means of providing citizens with a unique identifying code that can be used for transactions but also remain protected from hackers. He calls it a “modern cryptographic identifier.”

The longer the nation delays such an update, the greater the vulnerability we all will face. Right now, anyone who accesses basic information on Facebook or a simple Google search can identify where you grew up. That helps identify where you lived when your Social Security number was issued. That simple information helps reveal the first three digits of your Social Security number because those numbers were assigned geographically.

The last four digits are numbers we all routinely give out when speaking to customer service representatives to straighten out, say, credit card or phone billing questions. So seven of the nine digits already are vulnerable. Programmers have designed a computer algorithm that can accurately guess people’s Social Security numbers 44 percent of the time.

That’s scary. Americans are far too vulnerable. The potential losses from the Equifax breach alone could wind up in the billions of dollars. The cost of modernizing Social Security’s numbering system also wouldn’t be cheap.

Hackers around the world are betting the government will continue delaying and dithering. Sadly, they’re probably right.

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17-year-old charged with voyeurism as police investigate social media hacking case

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Vancouver police arrested a 17-year-old boy on voyeurism charges while investigating a case where someone hacked into a girl’s social media account and shared nude photos of her. The Vancouver Police School Resource Officer assigned to Union High School first began investigating the incident on Monday, September 18. A girl…

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Vetting of social media, phones possible as part of travel ban review

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The Trump administration is developing new ways to vet people coming into the United States as a deadline in the President’s controversial travel ban nears, officials said Tuesday. “Each of the opportunities that the US government has to interview and/or vet potential inbound travelers is being reviewed,” acting Customs and…

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Social Media’s Contribution To Virtual Terrorism

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

In the United States social networks are considered to be public spaces and any information shared there is covered under the so-called ‘third-party doctrine’, which means that users have no reasonable expectation of privacy regarding the data their service providers collect about them. Any data you post online in any…

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Are Popular Social Media Accounts more Likely to Get Targeted by Hackers?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hacker attacks are nothing new – yet they seem to have evolved in terms of focus and impact, as recent devastating malware attacks like WannaCry and Petya have demonstrated. Everybody is a target nowadays, but the trend does not stop at large companies and tech giants. It seems that cybercriminals…

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BELONG – a New Smart Dating and Social Experiences App – Launches in San Francisco

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Missouri man admits job-related social security fraud

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A St. Louis man has been ordered to spend four and a half years in federal prison for using social security numbers of others to conceal his criminal past while finding work with information technology companies. Twenty-nine-year-old Lawrence Jerel Higgins was sentenced Wednesday in St. Louis. That’s where he pleaded…

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Britain asks tech and social media giants to censor militant content

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Britain’s interior minister will use a visit to Silicon Valley on Tuesday to ask Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and YouTube to step up efforts to counter or remove content that incites militants. After four militant attacks in Britain that killed 36 people this year, senior ministers have repeatedly demanded that internet…

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