social

now browsing by tag

 
 

#sextrafficking | Social Media Posts Describing Predators Scrawling Letters and Numbers on Vehicles, Not Proven, Says EPD and HCSO – Redheaded Blackbelt | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

[Staged photo from the EPD] After receiving multiple people asking if the 1F/1C written in the dust on cars social media posts were real, we reached out the the Humboldt […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#romancescams | Social media influencer scams rise during COVID-19 | romancescams | #scams

A new report shows social media influencers are being increasingly hacked during Coronavirus by scammers looking to con adoring fans out of their money.  Influencers are usually attractive models trying […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#sextrafficking | Florida prosecutors charge 17-year-old with sex trafficking 14-year-old girl on social media | #tinder | #pof | #match | romancescams | #scams

_________________________ MIAMI – Prosecutors in South Florida have charged a 17-year-old boy with sex trafficking after he was accused of selling a 14-year-old girl online. The Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#minorsextrafficking | Crackpot social media theories are now becoming part of the mainstream | #parenting | #parenting | #kids

The logo of Immuni app, a smartphone app to trace the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections, is seen on a mobile phone, June 12, 2020. [Photo/Agencies] In a normal year, the […] View full post on National Cyber Security

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Social Security Scammers Are Trying a New Trick

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Millions of seniors depend on their Social Security payments to help them cover their monthly bills, so if that money were to get diverted into the hands of fraudsters, they’d be in big trouble. Unfortunately, retirees are among the most common targets of financial scams — so much so that elder financial abuse has been called “the crime of the 21st century.”

A recent warning from the Social Security Administration (SSA) further drives home this point. The agency is alerting beneficiaries that — in addition to the previously common telephone scams — criminals are now faking documents and emailing them to their targets. Such documents may appear to come from the SSA and may include its official letterhead, which isn’t difficult to replicate. But complying with their instructions could result in a world of financial stress.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

How to spot a Social Security scam

Social Security scams aren’t always easy to identify, but among the first red flags to look out for in any questionable communication are poor spelling and improper  grammar. Though the agency is understaffed, it surely has room in its budget for someone to do some proofreading, so if you receive documents under its letterhead that look unprofessional, it’s fair to assume that a criminal is behind them.

Additionally, if you receive a letter that includes any of the following, you can bet it’s a scam:

  • Threats of jail time or legal action unless you pay a fine.
  • Promises of benefit increases.
  • Payment demands, particularly through wire transfer, internet currency, or cash.

If there is a problem with your Social Security account, the SSA will usually send you a letter by mail, not email. It won’t call you up out of the blue. And while you may, in some cases, be asked to make a payment, it will never be via the aforementioned forms.

If you do receive a letter from the SSA and you’re not sure it’s legitimate, call the agency back at its main number — (800) 772-1213 — and speak to a live person. And if you get an email that’s clearly suspicious, don’t just delete it — report it. The same holds true for phone scams. While you shouldn’t engage the person on the other end of the line, you should report the incident to the SSA. There’s a dedicated online form that makes that simple to do.

It’s also a good idea to create a “my Social Security” account on the SSA’s website so you can easily keep tabs on your own benefits. This is an especially wise move if you’re not ready to claim Social Security yet, but are at an age where you would be allowed to — i.e., 62 or older. If a criminal files a benefit claim on your behalf, your later legitimate application may get rejected. But if you’re following the activity on your account, you’ll be able to take action to counter the scammer sooner.

Remember, just because you’re savvy enough to avoid falling victim to a Social Security con doesn’t mean everyone is, so report criminals’ behavior when you spot it. You could be saving others from becoming victims later. But on the plus side, with age does come some wisdom. According to a recent Better Business Bureau survey, it’s millennials — not seniors — who are most likely to fall victim to financial scams. Those aged 18 to 24 were more than three times more likely than those 65 and over to lose money to such cons. So maybe you should warn your grandchildren.

The $16,728 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook
If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,728 more… each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after. Simply click here to discover how to learn more about these strategies.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

Source link

The post #cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Social Security Scammers Are Trying a New Trick appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#comptia | #ransomware | Rancocas Valley High School students blocked from social media, but can stream music video – News – Burlington County Times

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Federal law requires schools to protect students from inappropriate content. Schools have different standards on what to block, records show.

MOUNT HOLLY — Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are off-limits.

Apple TV, Amazon Prime and Hulu video are just fine.

At Rancocas Valley Regional High School, cybersecurity systems are set to block student access to social media but allow teens to stream music and video on classroom devices, according to records released after a legal appeal to the New Jersey Government Records Council.

Beginning Nov. 8, this news organization filed open records requests with all Burlington County school districts.

Four months later, on Jan. 10, district officials released the requested information while apologizing for the delay.

“I reviewed the District’s initial response which did not include all of the documents I advised them to produce,” said George M. Morris, attorney for the school district. “Not sure where there was a breakdown in communication.”

Public schools are required by federal law to protect students from inappropriate content.

The information released by area schools districts shows that they have different standards for filtering content, protecting students and staff as well as the equipment financed by taxpayers.

In October, Cherry Hill School District in Camden County discovered some of its computer systems had been locked down and some district computer screens displayed the word “Ryuk,” a term associated with ransomware attacks.

Rancocas Valley is home to some 2,100 students from Eastampton, Hainesport , Lumberton, Mount Holly and Westampton.

In addition to streaming audio and video, Rancocas Valley students are allowed to access shopping, news and media, sports and travel websites, records show. A long list of blocked content includes dating, gambling, pornographic materials, sex education, tobacco, “sports hunting” and “war games.”

So far, records were provided by Bordentown Regional, Burlington City, Burlington Township, Cinnaminson, Delanco, Eastampton, Florence, Lenape Regional, Lumberton, Maple Shade, Medford, Moorestown, Mount Laurel, North Hanover, Palmyra, Riverside, Riverton, Shamong, Southampton, Springfield and Westampton.

Similar records requests are pending with Beverly City, Chesterfield, Edgewater Park, Evesham, Mansfield, the Northern Burlington County Regional School District and Willingboro schools.

Appeals have been filed with the New Jersey Government Records Council.

Under New Jersey’s Open Public Records Act, government agency must respond within seven days after receiving a request. Government agencies “must ordinarily grant immediate access to budgets, bills, vouchers, contracts,” according to the records council.

Source link

The post #comptia | #ransomware | Rancocas Valley High School students blocked from social media, but can stream music video – News – Burlington County Times appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | DEF CON 27, Social Engineering Village, Chris Hadnagy’s ‘SEVillage 10 Year Anniversary: A Look Back’

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Thanks to Def Con 27 Volunteers, Videographers and Presenters for publishing their superlative conference videos via their YouTube Channel for all to see, enjoy and learn. Permalink The post DEF CON 27, Social Engineering Village, Chris Hadnagy’s ‘SEVillage 10 Year Anniversary: A Look Back’ appeared first […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Students learn social media safety at FUSD as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

This week Fresno Unified students are being schooled on social media.

As part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, Fresno Unified had a special lesson for students this week.

“We want them to understand think before you post,” said Brian Dvorak with the Fresno Unified Education Technology Dept. “Think about your digital etiquette and your digital footprint. Is this something you want to be permanently out there online and a permanent record of your behavior?”

Students learned the importance of protecting their information and being on the lookout for malicious websites. Teachers also discussed managing screen time and being careful about what you put on the web, especially social media.

“It affects other people and it stays with you the rest of your life,” added Dvorak. “When you apply for a job, it may come back to haunt you.”

Today’s lesson focused on cyberbullying and the damage it can have.

“If someone posts something inappropriate, says something about someone, they could get in trouble, because it’s bullying and you really need to watch out for that,” said 7th-grade student Jaden Wondergen.

This is just the start. While all schools had to administer a lesson on the topic this week, they’ll continue to discuss the topic year-round. The curriculum is for students from kindergarten to 12th grade.

Copyright © 2019 KFSN-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Source link

The post #nationalcybersecuritymonth | Students learn social media safety at FUSD as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

International Conference on Social Media, Wearable and Web Analytics

General Cybersecurity Conference

 June 11 – 12, 2018 | Glasgow, United Kingdom

Cybersecurity Conference Description

IEEE is the Technical Co-Sponsor (TCS) of the International Conference on Social Media, Wearable and Web Analytics (Social Media 2018), an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of social media, security of social media and consequential impacts and risks due to compromise or security breaches. It covers economic importance of social media, the emergence of wearable, wearable for fitness, e-health and life style improvements, and the use of web analytics for social media enhancements, business intelligence and business empowerment.

With the wave of phishing attacks against celebrities, high profile government officials, and nationals on social media, this conference is timely. Most importantly, we seek recommendations, solutions and advice on ways, methods and techniques for protecting our digital society.

The aim of the Social Media 2018 is to encourage participation and promotion of collaborative scientific, industrial and academic inter-workings among individual researchers, practitioners, members of existing associations, academia, standardisation bodies, and including government departments and agencies. The purpose is to build bridges between academia and industry, and to encourage interplay of different cultures.

Social Media 2018 invites researchers and industry practitioners to submit papers that encompass principles, analysis, design, methods and applications. All submitted papers are independently peer-reviewed.

The conference proceedings will be submitted for consideration for publishing and listing on the following bibliographic indexes: IEEE Computer Society Digital Library, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, DBLP Computer Science, Scopus, CiteSeerX, Computer Science Index, EI Compendex, Academic Search Complete, CiteULike, Google Scholar & Microsoft Academic Search.

advertisement:

The post International Conference on Social Media, Wearable and Web Analytics appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

The #shocking #trend of people #breaking into each others’ #social media #accounts

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The #shocking #trend of people #breaking into each others’ #social media #accounts

Spouses hack each others’ Facebook messages, parents track their offspring’s cellphone movements and lovers crack lovers’ private messages.

To most of us, EFF leader Julius Malema’s recent claim that his e-mail account was attacked by government backed hackers left a bit of a Spy vs Spy taste in the mouth.

Particularly after SA Communist Party bigwig Solly Mapaila made the same claim two days later.

But I don’t think it is so farfetched that politicians’ confidential correspondence can be targeted by cyber attackers. Just ask Hillary Clinton.

The shocking trend, however, is that ordinary citizens are breaking into each others’ social media accounts left, right and centre.

It is those closest to people who break into their personal accounts and spy on their correspondence.

Spouses hack each others’ Facebook messages, parents track their offspring’s cellphone movements and lovers crack lovers’ private messages behind their naked backs.

The worst of all is that you don’t have to be a Russian hacker or cyber geek to breach somebody’s social media. People don’t need coding skills.

If you have the skills to use Twitter, you can hack Twitter. What about WhatsApp’s encoded message technology? Even a rookie hacker can choose from a variety of techniques to break into the messaging service account.

The most popular seems to be software which allows a hacker in after just a few minutes with the target’s phone, such as Copy9 and a host of others.

Or he doesn’t even have to touch your phone – sniffer software allows him to hack your WhatsApp account from a distance if you’re on the same WiFi network. And Facebook? The classical techniques are rather unrefined, because it locks the user out of his or her account, which means the hacking attempt will be noticed.

More stealthily, though, are software or hardware keyloggers, which records every keystroke the user makes on a computer including passwords.

Or the hacker can use software such as FaceGeek or Spyzie or Hyper Cracker. And Twitter? Software such as Twitterhacker is abundant.

Of course it is completely illegal to hack someone’s social media account under the Electronic Communications Act. You can even go to jail for it.

Perhaps our modern world needs more than laws.

The post The #shocking #trend of people #breaking into each others’ #social media #accounts appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures